Facts on Spur Stops?
 
 

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Facts on Spur Stops?

This is a discussion on Facts on Spur Stops? within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

    View Poll Results: Are you for or against training horses with the spur stop method?
    For 1 6.67%
    Nuetral 7 46.67%
    Against 7 46.67%
    Voters: 15. You may not vote on this poll

     
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        12-02-2010, 07:49 PM
      #1
    Banned
    Facts on Spur Stops?

    I'm writing a 5-6 page persuasive research paper for grammar class, and I have chosen to write about spur stops, also known as "riding the brakes".

    Does anybody know of any good sites with sone facts or statistics on stur stop trained horses, paticularly on how it affects the horses versatiliy and how/if it goes against a horses natural response to pressure? Also, are there any statistics on the organizations that refuse/discourage the method?

    If you have an opinion on the topic, please vote in the poll.

    Thanks for your help!
         
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        12-02-2010, 08:27 PM
      #2
    Banned
    Or any facts/ statistics on the positives for spur stops?
         
        12-02-2010, 09:37 PM
      #3
    Showing
    My biggest thing is that it's just not practical outside of the show ring or if you sell said horse to a non showing person. 85% of people have no idea what a spur stop is and another 14% have no idea how to use it properly. Most folks who have horses know the simple commands; legs to go, reins to turn and stop and really don't need such particular cues on their horses because they couldn't use them correctly anyway.

    For me, a spur stop on a horse would be an accident waiting to happen. The last thing I need would be to be flying across a pasture after a cow to rope it and touch my horse at just the wrong spot on his side and engage the hydraulic brakes. Besides, I teach my horses to rate themselves and while they are controlled, they are still moving out with energy and that's how I like it.
         
        12-02-2010, 10:01 PM
      #4
    Super Moderator
    I'm not a fan of them either. There was a horse at my camp a few years ago that someone must have thought would be funny to teach to spur stop (he was probably a TB/Clyde, but definitely some kind of draft cross) and do it badly. Well, this horse had no concept of leg pressure meaning anything but STOP. Any leg touch meant to him go slower or stop. It was really ridiculous. I spent the summer trying to retrain him out of that and I really wasn't able to get far since his natural inclination to move at leg pressure had been thoroughly messed up (I also wasn't very proficient with horses yet, semi proficient but not enough to be doing any sort of retraining).
    And, on top of that, he was a spooky horse and when I'm riding a spooky horse, I like to keep a little more leg on to kind of "reassure" them that I'm there and that they'll be ok. Well, with this horse I had absolutely no way of telling him that he was ok from the saddle. And since he was at least 17hh...Let's just say that I tried to ride him as little as possible. However, he was the one horse I've ever ridden that made me look short. Haha! He was also a really comfortable ride, through all that, just VERY spooky.
    However, sad day story: 2 years ago he fell out of a trailer and broke his leg and in xraying it, the doctor discovered that he hadn't gotten enough calcium as a youngster (or something) and that his bones were super brittle. So even though it wasn't a bad break, he was immediately put down. :(

    Anyway, I'm sure when it's trained correctly it can have it's uses but I really see no need for it. Why not just use "the seat stop"?
         
        12-02-2010, 10:46 PM
      #5
    Foal
    I am also NOT a fan of spur stops. I rode my friends Western Pleasure horse and those horses are NOT trained to verbal commands. In my experiences anyways. So to get her to move took a LOT of encouragement!
         
        12-03-2010, 01:04 AM
      #6
    Banned
    Thanks guys!
    I'm hoping to get a hold of a local WP trainer around here who is against (at least I'm pretty sure he is) spur stops and interview him.

    I'm going to try the AQHA website, since I've seen a few articles reffer to their "Big No-No" when training WP horses.

    Also, does anybody know of a good print source I could use on the topic?
         
        12-03-2010, 01:48 AM
      #7
    Banned
    I had no idea what spur stops where when I read your thread earlier, now I have the read the responses I get what it is. And while I ride in a completely different discipline, I don't understand who it could make any sense to do this.
    Some horses might be smart, but they would have to be really smart to understand that a spur means both stop and go. I don't think that if aliens dropped from the ski and tried to train me, that I would understand what the heck this would mean.
         
        12-03-2010, 01:56 PM
      #8
    Weanling
    AlexS, I don't completely agree that a spur would mean ONLY go or ONLY stop to a horse. Just like different verbal cues, rein pressure, and seat and leg pressure mean different things, a spur in a different spot/used differently would mean something different. Also, spurs were not invented to be used as "encouragement to go faster". In many disciplines they are intended to give more precise and a greater variety of cues. Unfortunately the majority of riders have incorrectly began to use them as an ecouragement of speed (not saying this as a criticism, I hope it doesn't come off that way, as it CAN be an effective method).

    That being said, I know nothing about spur stops so I don't have an opinion on them. It does seem like it could be confusing for a horse when ridden by somebody who doesn't know what they're doing - there's definitely a potential for sending mixed cues.
         
        12-03-2010, 07:14 PM
      #9
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by azarni    
    AlexS, I don't completely agree that a spur would mean ONLY go or ONLY stop to a horse. Just like different verbal cues, rein pressure, and seat and leg pressure mean different things, a spur in a different spot/used differently would mean something different. Also, spurs were not invented to be used as "encouragement to go faster". In many disciplines they are intended to give more precise and a greater variety of cues. Unfortunately the majority of riders have incorrectly began to use them as an ecouragement of speed (not saying this as a criticism, I hope it doesn't come off that way, as it CAN be an effective method).

    That being said, I know nothing about spur stops so I don't have an opinion on them. It does seem like it could be confusing for a horse when ridden by somebody who doesn't know what they're doing - there's definitely a potential for sending mixed cues.
    Azarni, would you mind elaborating on the cues? Could you train a horse to the spur stop and the normal use of spurs?
         
        12-03-2010, 07:20 PM
      #10
    Trained
    I've only ridden one spur-stop trained horse. It was actually really nice for riding the horse WP. I just put a but of pressure on with my leg and the horse slowed and dropped his head. I could stop him with a bit more pressure in the same area.

    However I wouldn't really want to ride a spur-stop trained horse in any other discipline, it would just go against the way I am used to riding and I'd end up with a very confused horse and I'd be confused myself.
         

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