Fatty McButterpants: Issue I
 
 

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Fatty McButterpants: Issue I

This is a discussion on Fatty McButterpants: Issue I within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

     
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        05-11-2009, 07:37 PM
      #1
    Green Broke
    Fatty McButterpants: Issue I

    As indicated in my post in the critique section, the haffy I am leasing has a few issues. As far as right now goes, I'm not sure which needs to be addressed more immediately; I haven't made a list as of yet, but will shortly and then will be addressing more issues. I'll just start with one right off the top of my head.

    Fatty has a terrible habit of being difficult when it comes to his feet. Before I started leasing him, his owner wasn't very good about getting his feet trimmed, and the last time it was done, it was done very poorly, and as far as I can tell, Fatty had a bad experience.

    The issue is that first, he is very resistant about having his feet picked up. I haven't seen him kick out, but when someone goes to pick up his feet, he wont pick them up, or he'll pick it up, and straighten it out and try to put it down again right away, and if you CAN get him in the right position, he leans.

    I've seen people give an elbow to the horses with an issues such as this, but I'd like to think there is an alternative to that.

    Suggestions/advice would be greatly appreciated.
         
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        05-11-2009, 09:28 PM
      #2
    Foal
    I know this isn't too much help, but honestly the best thing to do is repetition. Habits don't die hard, especially when horses figure out a easy way out. So basically, whenever he tries to put his leg down, just pick it up again (don't slap him or elbow him), and repeat until he does. Then hold his leg up (and pick out his feet or if you're just doing it for practice, just hold it up there and count to 10) then put it down, pat him and tell him he's a good boy. Slowly he'll realize you're going to make him pick up his feet no matter what, and it'll just be easier to do it right away.

    Good luck!
         
        05-11-2009, 10:58 PM
      #3
    Yearling
    Loki used to not want to pick up his feet, and if he did, he didn't want to hold them.

    So I became one irritating, obnoxious feet-picker-upper.

    First, I would botherbotherbother him until he picked up his foot. Praise! When he tried to pull it back, I would hold firmly on a say 'NU UH!' until he quit pulling and aloud me to clean his hoof, then, allow him to set it down. More praise, and peppermints.

    He's pretty good about picking up his feet now. Not perfect, but we manage.
    I've never dealt with a leaning problem, but I would attempt to position myself slightly away from him so there really isn't much to lean on to begin with.
         
        05-12-2009, 03:05 AM
      #4
    Showing
    What I have always done with a leaner is keep their knee (or hock) bent just enough to keep the foot off the ground. I hold the foot by the toe and provide absolutely no support for them to lean on. I just hold the foot up and let them lean. When they stand quietly without trying to pull their foot away, I let it down gently and praise. With repetition, they will find out there is nothing to lean against and stand up straight. In my experience, elbowing them in the ribs tends to make the picking up the feet problem worse. As for that, just work on picking them up, tap them a few times on the bottom with your flat hand, and when she stands quietly without resisting at all, let the foot back down and praise her. Just keep working on all 4 feet like that and it should help.
         
        05-12-2009, 05:49 AM
      #5
    Foal
    Haha. Fatty McButterpants.
         
        05-12-2009, 12:05 PM
      #6
    Super Moderator
    Yeah for the new halfie! It's going to take time to get him to pick up his feet like a good boy and then to allow you to keep them up w/out trying to force them back down again. I have one that is a heavy heavy leaner and what I do is actually put him agains the aisle walls, generally he will lean against the wall instead of sitting on the farrier but you have to turn his head towards the farrier kind of throws his balance onto the outside legs so that he leans towards the wall instead of on the farrier.

    Good luck!
         
        05-12-2009, 01:27 PM
      #7
    Showing
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by smrobs    
    What I have always done with a leaner is keep their knee (or hock) bent just enough to keep the foot off the ground. I hold the foot by the toe and provide absolutely no support for them to lean on. I just hold the foot up and let them lean. When they stand quietly without trying to pull their foot away, I let it down gently and praise. With repetition, they will find out there is nothing to lean against and stand up straight. In my experience, elbowing them in the ribs tends to make the picking up the feet problem worse. As for that, just work on picking them up, tap them a few times on the bottom with your flat hand, and when she stands quietly without resisting at all, let the foot back down and praise her. Just keep working on all 4 feet like that and it should help.
    Good advice for the leaning. I'm going to try it myself on Saro. Thanks Smrobs.
         
        05-12-2009, 05:32 PM
      #8
    Trained
    I don't think you're going to get better advice than what SMROBS already posted. It's spot on IMO.
         
        05-12-2009, 09:31 PM
      #9
    Green Broke
    Thanks to those who offered advice. I will use those techniques and report back and let you know how it goes.
         

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