First time I've ever felt uncomfortable around a horse in my life.. - Page 2 - The Horse Forum

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post #11 of 18 Old 03-22-2012, 07:12 PM
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Yes, I knew that racing TB's aren't taught to tie & aren't taught other "usual" things, as well. A helpful article on how to help your OTTB adjust, from someone who worked at the track, is on: www.horsemanpro.com. Go to articles, it's a how-to title.
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post #12 of 18 Old 03-22-2012, 07:25 PM
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Rearing that many times is unusual. How much grain is he getting? He may be busting with energy and dispels it by rearing. Too many people, women especially over feed their horses with high energy diets then confine the poor thing to a stall. This creates what seems to be bad behaviour.
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post #13 of 18 Old 03-23-2012, 02:16 AM
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Remember when you yank on a leadrope it ends up putting pressure just behind the poll (from the halter). The horse may have just not liked it and having his 'forward' blocked reared up.

Also like saddlebag said, maybe the horse just had too much grain which you can't really do much about sadly.
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post #14 of 18 Old 03-23-2012, 05:00 AM
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Sounds like the horse may have a dominant streak and almost certainly respect issues. I have a gelding that was guilty of some pretty similar unwanted behavior. For him, head tossing was an attempt to get the annoying human off his head before he escalated to rearing. For me, the day he reared was the last straw. He was with a professional trainer within a week.

For safety's sake, suggest she get her horse working with a trainer, and respectfully decline to handle her horse until she has done so. A good trainer will be able to determine if the rearing is motivated by respect or fear or if it's a conditioned response and address it accordingly.

If you're ever in the same situation again, do not back up. Get out of the striking zone by moving sideways. In the horse world, backing up is a sign of submission, so if you back up the horse thinks he can push you around. I have heard of it suggested that a rearing horse can be corrected by pulling down and sideways, then making it move its feet once it has all four back on the ground. Getting the horse to move its feet can also be a matter of respect - the one who moves his feet the most is more submissive. The more you can make the horse move his feet without moving yours, the more respect you'll have.

I am happy to report we had a major breakthrough with my gelding in the respect department just yesterday because I finally learned to hold my ground and demand respect from the most challenging horse I've ever worked with. I owe it all to my trainer, and it was worth the budget adjustment. No more worrying about him trying to run me over! Let her know a good trainer can make a world of difference for her horse and everyone who interacts with him.
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post #15 of 18 Old 03-23-2012, 09:17 AM
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This is the exact thing Hunter was doing at my old barn. Apparently he was doing it off and on all last summer with the BO and her dad. He had told me about it one time but she never said a word and he never reared with me. I got out to the barn one Sat morning and all the horses were out except Hunter, I called BO and asked why and she said that he had been rearing while going out to pasture. Not every time but about 1 in 10 times. I had no idea! So I put him out and went home and called my trainer. She said don't let him push you back (which BO was doing) so I called BO and told her to get tough with him. I went out Sunday and he was in the barn again called BO and she said he hubby wasn't home to help her put him out. Well I can't have BO afraid of my horse so I ended up moving him to trainers. He tried rearing twice with her and found out pretty darn quick that that was a very bad thing to do and has never tried it since. Make him work when he does that, it is a respect issue.
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post #16 of 18 Old 03-23-2012, 09:20 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wildequusheart View Post
Sounds like the horse may have a dominant streak and almost certainly respect issues. I have a gelding that was guilty of some pretty similar unwanted behavior. For him, head tossing was an attempt to get the annoying human off his head before he escalated to rearing. For me, the day he reared was the last straw. He was with a professional trainer within a week.

For safety's sake, suggest she get her horse working with a trainer, and respectfully decline to handle her horse until she has done so. A good trainer will be able to determine if the rearing is motivated by respect or fear or if it's a conditioned response and address it accordingly.

If you're ever in the same situation again, do not back up. Get out of the striking zone by moving sideways. In the horse world, backing up is a sign of submission, so if you back up the horse thinks he can push you around. I have heard of it suggested that a rearing horse can be corrected by pulling down and sideways, then making it move its feet once it has all four back on the ground. Getting the horse to move its feet can also be a matter of respect - the one who moves his feet the most is more submissive. The more you can make the horse move his feet without moving yours, the more respect you'll have.

I am happy to report we had a major breakthrough with my gelding in the respect department just yesterday because I finally learned to hold my ground and demand respect from the most challenging horse I've ever worked with. I owe it all to my trainer, and it was worth the budget adjustment. No more worrying about him trying to run me over! Let her know a good trainer can make a world of difference for her horse and everyone who interacts with him.
So agree with this, without my trainer I would have sold Hunter a long time ago. I was afraid of Hunter for the longest time and he had zero respect for me. Now we are working together better and better all the time and I have no fear of him. He doesn't even bite anymore lol
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post #17 of 18 Old 03-23-2012, 02:44 PM
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This horse sounds like trouble. As he's not yours, all you can do is strongly recommend some training and refuse to handle him until he has learned some ground manners.
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post #18 of 18 Old 03-23-2012, 03:16 PM
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Since he is not your horse I would make sure the owner is well aware of what issues you had and avoid handling this horse until she gets it taken care of - hopefully with help from a trainer or other experienced horse person. If you do have to handle this horse I would carry a riding crop to help reinfoce keeping him out of your space.

All I pay my psychiatrist is cost of feed and hay, and he'll listen to me any day!

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