first time trainer need help!! - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 5 Old 01-09-2014, 02:41 PM Thread Starter
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first time trainer need help!!

hi guys, 2 years ag i bought my first horse, i had ridden alot before and helped in barns, i first rode her when the month that she turned 3, for the next 3 i rode her about twice a week , then 4 times a week with my mother and her horse, she was doing great and even trotting some, but in the dry season we had no grass in our field of hay so we decided to board her here at farm. but the owner was very secretive about her location and didnt follow up with his word, and didnt let me visi her at his farm he would bring her to me and with no tack or saddle, so we finally got her back 5 onths later with all of her tack, now the field is full of grass and i have been walking her with a lead, yesterday i tried to ride her and she walked about 10 feet and wouldnt go further no matter what i did, ofcourse i understand that after not being ridden for 5 months she would be rebelious. i just need some advice from someone who has been through this or knows how to aproah this problem,what should a do and how should i go about getting her used to being undersaddle again? thank you all
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post #2 of 5 Old 01-09-2014, 03:31 PM
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Assuming that is just being stubborn and not in any pain. I am going to suggest getting a trainer to help you, due to your inexperience and your horses young age. I that is not an option I recommend going back to ground work for a few weeks, gain her respect back, work her under saddle but don't ride her while you just focus on groundwork. Most likely the riding problem will take care of itself. When you ride her and she does not want to move squeeze with your legs, cluck, and spank until she moves. Another option is to disengage her hind end by doing that she is moving her feet and then you can redirect her to go straight. Have you tried riding her with another horse and following them, if she follows another horse without issue she maybe a bit barn sour and again groundwork will help solve that as well.
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post #3 of 5 Old 01-09-2014, 03:39 PM Thread Starter
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thank you gssw5 i was thinking of hiring a trainer, i will look for one.she rides fine with other horses,they give her confidence and she is never spooky or stubborn when she is with a group but my mother sold her horse and my only friend tha had one moved so we are alone, i think she is lonely since she was living with other horses before, she is just a bit out of shape. next month i will try lounging her after i have gained her trust again she has always been a difficult lounger probably because i am unexperienced with it i am looking for a coach for myself so i can be a better trainer and wner to her. if she is barn sour should i try to find another horse to ride with or the opposite and work and ride alone?
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post #4 of 5 Old 01-09-2014, 04:10 PM
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Personally I would have her vet checked to make sure there are no laminitis/founder issues or any other such thing causing pain. Could even potentially be ulcer, especially with being a young horse and all the moving/training. If that's all ruled out, I would go back to ground work as suggested. Enlisting the help of a trainer would be the best thing for both of you. I was in your situation, and enlisted the help of a trainer. Thankfully it shortened our learning curve and forged a great partnership. I have seen those who don't and it usually involves a long, painful, and frustrating road. With regard to the barn/buddy sour there are exercises you can do to help. The best thing to do is do the majority of your work, whether groundwork or riding, near the barn, or the buddy. Let the rest be when the horse is being obedient away from the barn or buddy, and always reward the slightest try. Pick a small starting point for a goal, even if its just T-Posts as markers. Each lesson expect more distance for your horse...push the horse just enough out of its comfort zone, but not so far as to end up in a fight. Always dismount when riding at different places and away from the barn/buddy. The exercises/work can be anything. Just make sure its work and often good to make sure its something the horse can succeed in to minimize frustration since the real lesson is to be obedient away from the barn/buddy. I had a mare like this and we worked though it and you will to :)
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post #5 of 5 Old 01-09-2014, 04:32 PM Thread Starter
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Phura thank you for your advice, i am looking for a trainer to help me. im sure we will be able to get past this, i just needed some advice from someone who doesnt solve every problem with violence like the people here. the people here in costa rica teach the horses to fear them, it is sad and i dont want that with my horse just for her to respect me.
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