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The "free" or "fixer upper" horse and newbies an expensive but common mistake.

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        03-11-2012, 10:15 PM
      #41
    Foal
    Today me and my boyfriend went riding, it was about the 4th time I have got him on a horse in the year we have been together.. he was talking about buying himself a horse and I said id help him an that we would look at some gaited horses cause he doesnt like my ruff mare. Then I told him he would have to pay at least $1000 for a good horse and he changed his mind. Lol
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        03-11-2012, 10:49 PM
      #42
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Rascaholic    
    I will first say, "Herbound I agree with 90% of what you and everyone else is saying."
    Now having said that, sometimes horses have a way of finding the right place. Hard times, issues, needs training, just plain ole stubborn was my favorite..... These are descriptions of some of the horses I have been fortunate enough to own in my lifetime. I've euthanized more than one 2 weeks into ownership because it was the right thing to do. I'll just say this though....

    I wouldn't have missed a single one of them for the world. My current doll will most likely never be able to be ridden. (Do not trust a sellers vet!) But, I don't care anymore. He has my heart on a halter. Vet bills, hmmm yeah, xrays, ultra-sounds, therapy, chiro, anti inflammatory medications, we are even going a round with some hydrotherapy soon.

    I've been fortunate enough to ride, train, and own some special animals. Some with astounding potential. But, when it comes down to it, the ones I'll always hold special were those who came with issues, or came at a time in my life where I needed them as much as they needed me.

    So sometimes the "cheap or free" horse is worth the newbie trying. Sometimes being outhorsed will humble them enough to smarten up and learn. And yep sometimes it ends in disaster. Horses are like our lives, sometimes you just HAVE to take a chance......
    That was beautiful :) I am happy they found you because you sound like a very compassionate person. I think that it comes down to 1.) the tenacity of the person and 2.) how much money they have to devote to a project horse. Anything is possible BUT you can find yourself swimming in a sea of regret if your money runs out before your patience or vice versa.
         
        03-12-2012, 11:25 PM
      #43
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by herdbound    
    That was beautiful :) I am happy they found you because you sound like a very compassionate person. I think that it comes down to 1.) the tenacity of the person and 2.) how much money they have to devote to a project horse. Anything is possible BUT you can find yourself swimming in a sea of regret if your money runs out before your patience or vice versa.
    This is very true. I may someday have to decide if the quality of Rascals life is worth the extra effort. So far, we are fortunate that he is pain free and we have had some really tremendous vets and staff helping us along the way.
    herdbound likes this.
         
        03-13-2012, 12:11 AM
      #44
    Weanling
    Well said! I almost got myself into a bad situation with a stunning little pinto gelding that I had on trial. I fell in love with him as soon as I saw him but he was 6 y/o, very green and not a lot was known about his past. He was the worst horse for a rusty, nervous rider like me and after being thrown twice I was too scared to get back on him. To make matters worse the owner was saying he would go to the meat works if I didnt want him so I felt really torn. In the end he went back (and never ended up at the works which was a 'joke' apparently), I now have a 17 year old clydie x who still has his faults but is super quiet and just what I need. He is not pretty but at the end of the day the showy green horse is not much use if you are too scared to go near them!
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        03-13-2012, 07:34 AM
      #45
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by kiwi79    
    Well said! I almost got myself into a bad situation with a stunning little pinto gelding that I had on trial. I fell in love with him as soon as I saw him but he was 6 y/o, very green and not a lot was known about his past. He was the worst horse for a rusty, nervous rider like me and after being thrown twice I was too scared to get back on him. To make matters worse the owner was saying he would go to the meat works if I didnt want him so I felt really torn. In the end he went back (and never ended up at the works which was a 'joke' apparently), I now have a 17 year old clydie x who still has his faults but is super quiet and just what I need. He is not pretty but at the end of the day the showy green horse is not much use if you are too scared to go near them!
    That is so horrible when people threaten with the "slaughterhouse" tactic. That is just wrong. Forcing someone to make a decision based on their heart instead of their head is just wrong....glad everything worked out and you got what you want :)
         
        03-13-2012, 08:00 AM
      #46
    Showing
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by PerchiesKisses    
    Know at least this when looking at a first horse:
    • What discipline do you intend for it ~ don't get a horse with heaves and then intend to do barrels with it.
    I wish that would be always a case. Unfortunately many people change the mind with time. I got my qh for trail riding only. I started dressage with her even though she's lacking dressage confo.
    PerchiesKisses likes this.
         
        03-13-2012, 08:35 AM
      #47
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by kitten_Val    
    [/LIST]I wish that would be always a case. Unfortunately many people change the mind with time. I got my qh for trail riding only. I started dressage with her even though she's lacking dressage confo.
    Yep. And the sweet gentle first horse we so deeply fall in love with we often outgrow within a couple of years as our skills grow and our confidence matures. Then often our interests change as well. BUT for the very first horse you just can't beat "old faithful".
         
        03-13-2012, 08:40 AM
      #48
    Showing
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by herdbound    
    BUT for the very first horse you just can't beat "old faithful".
    Lol! My first horse was unhandled yearling. So unfortunately I can't speak from experience.
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        03-13-2012, 09:17 AM
      #49
    Foal
    I feel sorry for the Horse!

    Usually around the 1st of the year, I get alot of calls from parents who got their son or daughter a "pony" for Christmas. Usually the horse was either dirt cheap or free and they have no clue how to take care of it. When the customer hears what the farrier costs will be they usually scoff at how often the feet need to be done. That's just a small price compared to everything else they may need to do with that horse. The one that's paying the ultimate price is the horse. Nowadays a person can pretty much get a free horse anywhere but little do they know that there is really no such thing. Between time and money it takes alot of work. I really wish that some sort of mandatory class would be required for new horse owners to purchase a horse, just like a person has to do when they get their drivers liscense.
    herdbound likes this.
         
        03-13-2012, 12:37 PM
      #50
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by kitten_Val    
    [/LIST]I wish that would be always a case. Unfortunately many people change the mind with time. I got my qh for trail riding only. I started dressage with her even though she's lacking dressage confo.
    We can always change our minds - I myself went through two very different horses before finding Nikki who I'm pretty sure is my "forever horse" ... but for a first horse I think it's important to have an intended direction. Know what you LIKE to do so that you can get a horse that fits that criteria, then if things change we can either train for the new goal with the current horse, or if things work out a different way - sell the horse and get something that does fit what the new goal is.

    The important thing is to get a horse that can physically and mentally handle what you're looking to do.
    clip clop likes this.
         

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