Free Video Lesson: Dealing with Herd Boundness/Barn Sourness
   

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Free Video Lesson: Dealing with Herd Boundness/Barn Sourness

This is a discussion on Free Video Lesson: Dealing with Herd Boundness/Barn Sourness within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Free easy lessons to video editing skill
  • How to stop herd boundness

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  • 1 Post By Ian McDonald
  • 1 Post By Shropshirerosie
  • 2 Post By Foxhunter
  • 1 Post By Ian McDonald
  • 3 Post By Ian McDonald
  • 1 Post By Peppy Barrel Racing

 
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    11-25-2012, 09:00 PM
  #1
Yearling
Free Video Lesson: Dealing with Herd Boundness/Barn Sourness

(Apologies if this is post-whoring. Just experimenting with the format here, deciding on whether to put all subsequent videos in the same thread or start a new one for each topic. Feedback on that is welcomed! -Ian)

Intro: This time I went with live audio and my good friend and chronicler (whom I will give due credit if he so desires) was able to come along and film it. His camera work is always superior. The audio was recorded live on a separate device and is only slightly off as the raw footage didn't transfer perfectly to my laptop. If anyone knows of a rock-solid, easy no-frills video editor for Windows (even if it's not free), let me know. I'm in the market for one. XD

I'm finding out that talking to a camera is an entirely separate skill that takes awhile to get the hang of.

Without further adieu, here is myself and Ginger working on 'curing' her herd-boundness.


Some thoughts on curing herd-boundness:

1. When the horse gets busy, I get busier.
2. When she gets quiet, I get quieter.
3. Allowing her to express her natural curiosity helps her to gain confidence and learn responsibility for me (the rider). However, I don't want her to shut me out and run blindly back to the other horses either. So there is a line.
4. If she won't stand, it's all good. I can channel that excess energy and use it to improve on our maneuvers (start, stop, turn around, etc).
5. If she will stand, it's all good. My idea has become her idea.
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    11-25-2012, 09:47 PM
  #2
Yearling
I'm looking forward to watching this video when I have proper time to focus. In the meantime, I say - a separate thread for each topic. This way the subject matter stays focused. Or semi-focused anyway! Any of your 'followers' can go to your member profile to find all your threads if wanted.
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    11-26-2012, 04:19 AM
  #3
Yearling
Well very good and very interesting! Thank you so much for sharing!! I have a question Ian, why do you ride with your hands so high? Why not keep them low and quiet? Very good though, I look forward to watching more!
     
    11-26-2012, 06:52 PM
  #4
Super Moderator
Interesting and a great stamp of horse!
However, I would not say that she is barn sour or as we say in the UK nappy.

Sure thing she wants to go to the herd but that is instinctive.

What I would call nappy is a horse that really resists turning away from home, spinning around rearing and really digging its toes in.
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    11-26-2012, 09:12 PM
  #5
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shropshirerosie    
I'm looking forward to watching this video when I have proper time to focus. In the meantime, I say - a separate thread for each topic. This way the subject matter stays focused. Or semi-focused anyway! Any of your 'followers' can go to your member profile to find all your threads if wanted.
Thanks, and I'm inclined to agree. Separate threads for separate topics seems easier to manage.
     
    11-26-2012, 09:13 PM
  #6
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Foxhunter    
Interesting and a great stamp of horse!
However, I would not say that she is barn sour or as we say in the UK nappy.

Sure thing she wants to go to the herd but that is instinctive.

What I would call nappy is a horse that really resists turning away from home, spinning around rearing and really digging its toes in.
LOL true. It could indeed be much worse. It's the same instinctual resistance though, just a matter of degrees. XD
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    11-26-2012, 09:32 PM
  #7
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Army wife    
Well very good and very interesting! Thank you so much for sharing!! I have a question Ian, why do you ride with your hands so high? Why not keep them low and quiet? Very good though, I look forward to watching more!
That is a very good question and the answer has some history in my learning process. There are a couple of reasons why I use my hands like this. One is that I'm also interested in California-style ranch roping which requires the rider's hands to sometimes guide the horse from different positions.

I actually first became aware of handling the reins long and high while watching Ray Hunt. On the Tom Dorrance benefit clinic DVD, Ray rides his mare for over an hour and the impression I got from watching him was that he would take his hands wherever they needed to be in order to get his point across to the mare. One thing that I've noticed about cowboys in general is that they don't always follow the rules of classical riding and are more apt to improvise with their own variations of style.

Then I saw Leslie Desmond handle the reins in a similar way at a recent clinic and it really made me take notice. What I think we're doing here is teaching our horses to operate with slack in the reins by leading them from in the saddle, drawing the horse's eye toward my hand 'visually' rather than as a response to the feeling of a pull. Hence the technique of taking my hand farther away from what you might call the 'proper position'. Overall though, the reins are just one part of the picture. What I'm really attempting to teach the mare to do is to guide by my line of sight and intent, so that the reins become my second, rather than first, resort when I'm stopping, backing or turning my horse.

The short answer is, it's just personal style.
     
    11-26-2012, 10:16 PM
  #8
Banned
I like your video's. I watched this the other day but got distracted and forgot to post. Shiny objects and all that. Keep them coming. I bring away something from each of them so far.

And definitely separate threads for each type you do. If you expand on one video with more information or different approach, you could just update that one.
     
    11-26-2012, 10:45 PM
  #9
Started
I also hold my hands and reins high like that when I'm training. I found it's great for teaching light quick responses in my horses. But it was nice to see someone else do that as well. I kinda got made fun of by one of my horse trainer friends when he saw me doing that. But a light leg cue followed by a light rein cue is all you need with my horses so I figured I had to be doing something right. Glad to see I'm not crazy lol. I enjoyed your video keep them coming .
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    11-27-2012, 12:52 AM
  #10
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ian McDonald    
That is a very good question and the answer has some history in my learning process. There are a couple of reasons why I use my hands like this. One is that I'm also interested in California-style ranch roping which requires the rider's hands to sometimes guide the horse from different positions.

I actually first became aware of handling the reins long and high while watching Ray Hunt. On the Tom Dorrance benefit clinic DVD, Ray rides his mare for over an hour and the impression I got from watching him was that he would take his hands wherever they needed to be in order to get his point across to the mare. One thing that I've noticed about cowboys in general is that they don't always follow the rules of classical riding and are more apt to improvise with their own variations of style.

Then I saw Leslie Desmond handle the reins in a similar way at a recent clinic and it really made me take notice. What I think we're doing here is teaching our horses to operate with slack in the reins by leading them from in the saddle, drawing the horse's eye toward my hand 'visually' rather than as a response to the feeling of a pull. Hence the technique of taking my hand farther away from what you might call the 'proper position'. Overall though, the reins are just one part of the picture. What I'm really attempting to teach the mare to do is to guide by my line of sight and intent, so that the reins become my second, rather than first, resort when I'm stopping, backing or turning my horse.

The short answer is, it's just personal style.
I think it's great that you pick up so much from different ppl. I am starting a 2 year old right now, and I find it's better for her if I use wider hands at times. I suppose the quieter hands come with softer horses. Not that your horse isn't soft!! Lol that's not at all how I mean that, just subtle cues later on is all that's needed. A friend of mine did a lot of hand directions on the ground. When he started his mare, he had a hard time turning her with his reins. One day he just pointed while mounted and she went! Lol go figure, horses pick up the strangest things.
     

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