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Frustrated with newish horse and need help

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    09-12-2012, 12:29 PM
  #11
Green Broke
NYAPS, what your Mom is doing on this is ABUSE. It matters not if you are 15 or 25.

Do not allow anyone to force you into a position of abuse.. EVER. Be your own captain of your own ship. If you are afraid to ride this horse, DON'T. Tell them "No!".. it is a complete sentence!!!! If you say NO and walk away, they may dance around and yell and carry on. Take off your listening ears and take care of YOU.
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    09-12-2012, 12:48 PM
  #12
Showing
Load you pockets with treats for him, carrot pieces, etc. He will benefit from a little clucker training. First teach him to touch something, the end of a riding crop is fine. Just hold it within reach and let him know you have goodies. When he touches the tip and it will happen accidently, make a cluck sound as soon as he touches it, then offer a treat. The cluck must come during the desired action, not afterwards. It teaches him that a reward will follow. It will take about 10 min for him to catch on. Now, when you touch his ear cluck as you are touching it then remove it to offer the treat. He will become more interested in getting a treat than his ears. The next day work on placing your hand on his neck behind his ears. By now he knows he has to do something to get a treat and his head may go up, down and all around as he searches for the right answer. The moment he drops his head even an inch, remove your hand and treat. Your goal will be to train him to lower his head and allow you to mess with his ears without having to reach high. Spend a few days working on this before you attempt to bridle him again. Reinforce all you have taught him with clucker training. (it's clicker training but you don't need a clicker, thus "clucker") Instead of bridling him when he's good with his ears, rub him around the head with the bridle (bunched up). Let him feel the leather on his ears. A big mistake people make when bridle is pushing the horse's ears back then pulling them out from under the leather. Try to press the ear forward instead. Ears back, bad attitude, ears forward, good attitude.Have fun with this. You can also use this method when you are riding. If you are pleased with how he's going, click and treat. He'll reach around for it.
     
    09-12-2012, 01:21 PM
  #13
Foal
Thanks for responding! I've decided that, when I go out there today with my mom to feed him and clean up his area, I will evaluate how I feel around him then and perhaps try the clucker training because that seems easy and safe enough for me. If I don't feel okay enough around him then I will be firm around my mom and tell her I don't want to work with him and just continue cleaning up and stuff.

Also, if I still can get the new horse and he hasn't sold by then, we would have to put the two horses in the same pasture. Would it be okay for me to lunge and stuff with the new one while he is in the pasture? Or would I have to put him up somewhere while I do it? Also I will definitely by something seasoned and well broke, I'm looking at a twelve year old one. I still want to lunge him and stuff on the ground to try to gain his respect.
     
    09-12-2012, 02:35 PM
  #14
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by nyaps    
Thanks for responding! I've decided that, when I go out there today with my mom to feed him and clean up his area, I will evaluate how I feel around him then and perhaps try the clucker training because that seems easy and safe enough for me. If I don't feel okay enough around him then I will be firm around my mom and tell her I don't want to work with him and just continue cleaning up and stuff.

Also, if I still can get the new horse and he hasn't sold by then, we would have to put the two horses in the same pasture. Would it be okay for me to lunge and stuff with the new one while he is in the pasture? Or would I have to put him up somewhere while I do it? Also I will definitely by something seasoned and well broke, I'm looking at a twelve year old one. I still want to lunge him and stuff on the ground to try to gain his respect.
That is kind of your call. I personally would separate them so one won't get in the way and cause a disaster. Horses are very good at that! Also if you take one horse out to work with him, you won't have to split your attention between the horses, part on the one and part on the other to make sure he doesn't do anything. You can totally focus on one horse and gain his respect. By the way, I think it is a very good idea to sell a horse that scares you that much.
     
    09-12-2012, 03:00 PM
  #15
Banned
How does he react when you put a halter on? It's hard to say if it's his ears, or his bit that he is reacting to.

Is it possible that your Aunt could be with you when you work him, if your mom is forcing you to do this.
If I were you, I'd not work the horse at all, but that's your decision to make.
     
    09-12-2012, 04:00 PM
  #16
Foal
Thanks for responding!

ParaIndy, I will definitely find a way to put the other up then. The horses there are turned out with stalls to go into as they please, but I don't think they have a door. I will check later! I don't go down there often, my aunt usually goes out to play with him and will feed him for us and I only go if she doesn't go out that day or if things need to be cleaned.

AlexS, we generally leave his halter on because that is how the trainer kept him and no one has told us to take it off, but after googling it just now, I will tell whoever goes down there next (or I'll just take it off if it's me) to take it off. However, I have seen him have his halter put on before and he seemed fine with it. He also seemed fine with it when the trainer put the bridle on him the one time we went there to ride him around at the trainer's (the only time he'd been ridden that much since the trainer refused to get on him). He also seemed fine with that.

Every time, he has fought my aunt on putting it on except the time before last and he had absolutely no problems then. The two times I've seen her try though, he has either reared up some, or backed so far he dragged her. One time, she even had the reins around his neck and he took off running around the field with the bridle dangling and broke off part of it. She caught him and tried it again and he let her put it on him after a few tries. Then she and my friend rode him around bareback for a few minutes each and then got me to hop on, which is when I fell off and hit my head. He's also generally fine after it's on - it's just getting it on that's the problem.

She and two other girls tried the last time I was there, the time he reared, and they could get him to take the bit, but whenever they got it near the top of his head, he'd freak out.

Editing to add he's also ridden in a D-ring snaffle, I think. At least that's what I told my mom to get and what the trainer put him in, but I don't know much about bits so I'm not certain if that's what she got.
     
    09-12-2012, 06:48 PM
  #17
Super Moderator
I feel that you are way too far out of your depth here to be safe around this horse
I would feel really nervous about telling you to do anything with him without actually seeing for myself what he's doing and how much of it is bluff just to frighten you or how far he might go
Ask your mum to consider how she would feel if you were seriously hurt.
Can you not find a local dealer who would take him off you?
Losing money would be the least of my worries right now.
You could try to find a good trainer to sort things out but I'd cut my losses and let him go
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    09-13-2012, 04:29 PM
  #18
Trained
That sounds to me like this horse is way smarter than some people.......especially smarter than this so-called trainer. I can't help it but I think she messed things up. "Trained her dressage horse and gives lessons".......not much if a qualification IMO

Result now us that you are scared of a probably very beautiful, smart, well trained little horse you shouldn't have bought in the first place.

If this was my horse, I'd spend a lot of quality time with him, visit in pasture, groom him etc. Then I'd start ground working him. On a long leadrope. Then go from there. I think if you would know him better you might want to try again. I wouldn't let my mother dictate me in this way if I was that afraid, first of all. I'd probably get my aunt to help me out. Then I'd find a trainer who knows what he or she is doing, especially one who has experience with Arabs.
Or, I'd sell him and expect losses.
I, personally, would not sell or trade him to a dealer....poor thing, which knows where he'll end up, having problems like that.
If you were close to me I'd take him in a heartbeat.
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    09-13-2012, 04:42 PM
  #19
Foal
jaydee, my mom has seemed to calm down about it all and I think she is going to let me off the hook with working with him. I am still probably going to try a few things with him, but on my own terms and just to get used to being around him while he's still here.

deserthorsewoman, my parents thought she seemed qualified and insisted that she'd have no problems getting him ready for me, as did the trainer. I've now learned that she really isn't all she said to be. I was very, very, very stupid to get a horse that wasn't very well broke and to trust that trainer's opinion.

And I probably am. I know it's bad, but I can't get over my mental block about him. I'd rather just get more of a confidence builder. My aunt is fearless on a horse, but has no experience with training or anything and I doubt she's ever taken lessons - I think all she really knows is how to hop on and go. I will have her with me if I do decide to work with him any though, but I'm starting to doubt I will do much at this point - aside from maybe some clucker training. All of the trainers around here are several hundred dollars (which I understand is normal, but he was already a lot of money for us to start out with) and I don't think it's worth it. I think the both of us would be much happier with someone else.

I would definitely not take him to a dealer. I won't let him get sold to anyone I don't think would be a good home for him - I would absolutely not stand for him going to auction or anywhere. I just think he'd make someone a great horse with some miles on him and someone experienced to work with - just not me.
     
    09-13-2012, 05:07 PM
  #20
Trained
Do the clicker/ clucker training. And just spend time with him. You know that quarabs are wonderful horses who will work their hearts out for you once you get to know them?
Don't take any pressure from anybody, and, come to think about it, I wouldn't even let your aunt come either.
And for that trainer...if she insisted she could train him and then quit, she should give you your money back. That's called work ethics. ..

I see you don't want him any bad at all, that's good to know. I'd wouldn't hurry very much selling him. Get to know each other better, and decide then. If nothing else, it'll make you a better horse-person
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