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Gaining Respect

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  • Gaining respect when tacking up

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    02-27-2013, 09:23 PM
  #11
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deschutes    
Tiny, he isn't aggressive, he just pins and I get a "glare" vibe, particularly when tacking. I haven't visited him in a while, but I will see him this saturday. But you are right, it wouldn't be fair to have him change. I know people who used to hate riding him because he would do his best to undermine the rider, but, I have heard good comments about how he is now, so maybe being push button is a good thing.

I thought that if I had earned more respect, our work could be better. He does as I ask, and he works well, we just fight a lot with him cutting corners and ducking down the middle of the arena, as is what he is used to when jousting.

Better than we were before, but meh. I can let it slide.
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Well, now, this is better. Think in specifics. Not that you are going to get his respect in some general "we'll have a good bond thingy", but which things are a problems and how can I work on them?

He is cutting corners, right? Falling in on the circle? That's a great problem to tackle, as it's one you'll find with horses a lot. Why don't you see if you can't just work on that one problem.

The other thing would be to occassionally change things up for him, to freshen him. Such as going out for a trail rider, or having him do some cavaletti, or seeing if you can just get him to CHARGE as fast as possible from one side of the arena to the other. Surprise him a little. But, be fair and if you ask him to smarten up on something he's gotten dull on, then also give him some time to just move out on a long rein for a bit.
     
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    02-27-2013, 09:31 PM
  #12
Yearling
Right! Thank you.

I know I need to work on my leg, it isn't entirely as strong as I would like it to be, but at least now when he ducks down the middle I can stick it, haha! Before I'd just plop to the ground.

One of the reason he cuts corners, is because of the stage on one end. I don't think he likes it very well. He rounds the other corner and stays very well to the rail except for the stage end.

I plan on doing light work up until he gets used to regular work, so as to hopefully cut out some sourness.
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    02-28-2013, 12:02 AM
  #13
Foal
I like the trail ride ideal - let him go on some fun outings., at a pace he enjoys... That can only help your bond with him. Don't sweat the small stuff with the lesson horses!!
     
    02-28-2013, 12:14 AM
  #14
Weanling
My last and current horses both got Parelli sour on me. I backed right off the junk and they came around quickly. All of my horsemanship is infused with NH, and they seem to appreciate the more considerate approach, but I think more horses than not are exasperated with all the tip-toeing, rubberised dosie-doe crap, if you know what I mean. Forward thinking is engaging. "You made your point, I do it in my dreams every night, now leave it alone, already! Lol!"
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    02-28-2013, 12:17 AM
  #15
Yearling
Oh yeah, I agree.

Most of it might be rider error, anyway, but he does pull the same stunts on my instructor as well sometimes. Very ancticipatory horse, to say the least. : p.
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    02-28-2013, 11:58 AM
  #16
Super Moderator
You could do that old "you work hard at the place where you WANT to be, and you get to rest at the place where you DON'T WANT to be" to possibly change his distaste for that end of the arena.
     
    02-28-2013, 12:07 PM
  #17
Yearling
I don't tolerate pinned ears or turning their butt towards me at all. If he turned hisbut towards me, he'd get a nice stripe with a lead rope. And when my horses pin their ears at me while I'm tacking up and give me a dirty look, they get a quick slap on the neck and a "no!" just with my hand. They learn, they are like children, one little quirk leads to another..
     
    02-28-2013, 12:12 PM
  #18
Yearling
Right. That could work Tiny. I will give it a shot.

And yes, that is right, Wanstrom. He never snaked his head before... Until a pony/arab cross mare taught him how. Never really pinned, until he worked often with Brown. Never pawed at feeding time either! Until Chance got pastured with him and Shooter thought it was cool. ><
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    02-28-2013, 12:15 PM
  #19
Yearling
Some horses are just not cut out to be multiple people horses. Sometimes they can be not personable. They have personalities too.

A horse I had a few years ago was like that. We got him because he went pretty arena sour for his owner and my father needed a horse for the mounted unit. When we got him he was a bit of a pain. He was barn sour, buddy sour and threw temper tantrums. With work he learned that those got him no where. Still didn't exactly change his attitude. He still preferred to run away than to be caught. (An issue my father never let me fix, he believed that walking him down would only reinforce the behavior and persisted on grain and tricking him into haltering) He always looked grumpy and overall had a negative worth ethic. He still did everything asked, but you could tell he wasn't exactly happy about it. Though he did enjoy trails, anything else brought out the grump face.

Most horses that are in lesson programs or on equestrian teams become like this. Some go further south and become aggressive. Its situational and beyond letting the horse know that disrespect is a no no, there is not much you can do to improve their attitudes.
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    02-28-2013, 12:22 PM
  #20
Yearling
Brown was one of those who became over handled due to having lots of greenies on him (he was at a boy's camp for a while) and I can attest to the aggressiveness. Nipping while girthing up (which, I think may just be him having sensitivity there due to past abuse), nipping post turning out, kicking, etc. The nipping was the worst problem. But when he deals with a hose, he kicks out. He has gotten better, after a few come to jesus meetings, but he will always be sour.
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