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Galloping & One Rein Stop

This is a discussion on Galloping & One Rein Stop within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

     
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        01-09-2010, 09:56 AM
      #111
    Started
    You are all about the result. You don't care about how the horse feels about a situation, and you really don't understand how a prey animal thinks. Even the most mellow horse is still a prey animal, and if you forget that, you are going to get seriously hurt. Oh, and I didn't break my warmblood....I re-started him....there is a big difference between 'breaking' a horse and 'starting or re-starting' him. And I've worked with plenty horses who are spoiled brats and scared messes and I get results quickly...and not because I inflict pain on them.

    You treat horses like dogs? You are dealing with two difference species who think NOTHING alike. Dogs are predators, horses are prey animals. If you can't understand the difference in their thoght processes you shouldn't be working with horses. Maybe stick with your dogs.
         
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        01-09-2010, 12:56 PM
      #112
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Ne0n Zero    
    Beau stops just fine WTC. At least, in the arena. However. Once the horse gets to a full out gallop, there is no stopping him. It's more of a "hang on and enjoy the ride" type thing, as much as I hate admitting that. It's his one and only vice.
    Interesting thread. When this happens are you in English or Western tack? Any why do you think there is not enough room in an arena to gallop him?

    I'm no horse trainer, but I've hauled my daughter to countless lessons with some very good trainers and always ask and listen to their training methods.

    I see your avatar shows an English saddle, so this may not be applicable. In western tack, I've seen lots of Reining trainers use a training method called fencing to reinforce the stop. Basically driving a horse to a fence where the horse has to stop. Starting from the walk, then trot, then lope, etc. Then backing away from the fence to the middle of the arena and asking for the stop in the same manner at different gaits. This is all done using voice, seat and leg cues and not getting in their face. Seems to be effective. Thought I would throw it out there in case it might help.
         
        01-09-2010, 01:34 PM
      #113
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Spirithorse    
    I've worked with plenty horses who are spoiled brats and scared messes and I get results quickly...and not because I inflict pain on them.

    .
    I would love to hear how you would go about breaking a really bad barn sour horse for the owner on a weekend? The auction is Tuesday and meat buyers buy most of the horses and ship them out of province.
    You have the weekend to show the owner that her horse is not barn sour.
    To build her confidence and convince her to keep the horse.'
    The horse is 8 or 9, an experience eventer and she is in her mid 20's and a very experience rider. She competed with him, she can not get more then 100 yards from the barn when he goes up, spins and runs straight back to the barn with her haveing no control what so ever.
    How are you going to save that horse???
    Remember you have the weekend and Tuesday morning the horse is going???
         
        01-09-2010, 01:45 PM
      #114
    Weanling
    Sorry, haven't read the whole thread, but once I was riding a hard-to-slow horse in a muddy place, and when I tried a mild ORS she slipped right off her feet. Fortunately we weren't hurt, but a bit shaken and very muddy. But wow, it worked! She was MUCH more attentive when I asked her to slow, FOREVER after.

    But I don't actually recommend this.
         
        01-09-2010, 03:26 PM
      #115
    Super Moderator
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Jarrett    
    Interesting thread.
    I've seen lots of Reining trainers use a training method called fencing to reinforce the stop. Basically driving a horse to a fence where the horse has to stop.

    Well, that would SO not work with my horses. They would simply jump the fences. I've had them even jump 4 foot barbed wire fences with me through the years.

    The emergency/calvary stop is something I rarely use, but if you need it.....
    I have never had it fail to quickly, and safely, stop a hard bolting horse.
         
        01-09-2010, 03:41 PM
      #116
    Super Moderator
    This is a video of a Jim Briggs clinic. It shows him using very patient positive reinforcement on a horse afraid of water on XC. But, this pony was a run away boy on XC. So Jim, knowing how dangerous it can be got on and performed a calvary stop on him at approx 1:59. Jim is strong and laid it on him. The horse was so surprised he went down. That is hoe effective it is. You don't have to be very strong to make it work. NOW, the difference between this stop and the oft incorrectly used one rein stop, is that the horse went down straight, now falling on his side and rolling. That is an important difference. He went straight down. After a little schooling, the horse "got it". At the end, you see this kid confidently galloping this same horse, knowing they could stop together afterwards. Good video, IMO.



    Jim's training is very gentle and supportive. However, a horse MUST be stoppable to be safe. I agree, to a point, with all the posters, here. Riosdad is correct that this must be fixed. If a couple of calvary/emergency stops is what it takes, so be it. Both human and horse will benefit from this communication.

    I also agree with spanking (not beating)kids who refuse to comply with directives (especially where safety is concerned). My bad!!
         
        01-09-2010, 03:56 PM
      #117
    Showing
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Jarrett    
    I see your avatar shows an English saddle, so this may not be applicable. In western tack, I've seen lots of Reining trainers use a training method called fencing to reinforce the stop. Basically driving a horse to a fence where the horse has to stop. Starting from the walk, then trot, then lope, etc. Then backing away from the fence to the middle of the arena and asking for the stop in the same manner at different gaits. This is all done using voice, seat and leg cues and not getting in their face. Seems to be effective. Thought I would throw it out there in case it might help.
    I'm pretty sure those horses have been *taught* to halt when they're driven toward a fence. I went to a ranch a few summers back so I could have the experience of riding a variety of horses.....one of the inexperienced girls was being taught to lope, and she couldn't stop the horse, flailing the reins this way and that, accidentally curing the horse towards a fence. The horse rammed into the fence, jumped sideways, and left the rider in the dust as he loped off lol. The rider was okay, but this is why I don't reccomend the fence-stop ;)
         
        01-09-2010, 04:09 PM
      #118
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Spirithorse    
    You are all about the result. You don't care about how the horse feels about a situation, and you really don't understand how a prey animal thinks. Even the most mellow horse is still a prey animal, and if you forget that, you are going to get seriously hurt. Oh, and I didn't break my warmblood....I re-started him....there is a big difference between 'breaking' a horse and 'starting or re-starting' him. And I've worked with plenty horses who are spoiled brats and scared messes and I get results quickly...and not because I inflict pain on them.

    You treat horses like dogs? You are dealing with two difference species who think NOTHING alike. Dogs are predators, horses are prey animals. If you can't understand the difference in their thoght processes you shouldn't be working with horses. Maybe stick with your dogs.
    *i havent read the whole thread*
    But, dogs and horses do think alike on quite a few things. They are both pack/herd animals, both depend on theirpack/herd for survival. If you really look into it they are quite alike, even tho they both eat different things.
         
        01-09-2010, 04:13 PM
      #119
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Allison Finch    
    Well, that would SO not work with my horses. They would simply jump the fences. I've had them even jump 4 foot barbed wire fences with me through the years.

    The emergency/calvary stop is something I rarely use, but if you need it.....
    I have never had it fail to quickly, and safely, stop a hard bolting horse.
    I've seen alot of fencing done too . But the fences are not your normal fences. They are arena walls or high 6-8 foot fencing. You actually run the horse into a corner forcing it to slam on.
         
        01-09-2010, 04:25 PM
      #120
    Banned
    This is the guy I got alot of my information from. I follow his way of trainer and alot of times I am just regurgitating? What he says.
    I really respect this guy.
    About Al Dunning
         

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