Galloping & One Rein Stop - Page 13
 
 

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Galloping & One Rein Stop

This is a discussion on Galloping & One Rein Stop within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Calvary stop horse
  • Jim briggs horse trainer

 
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    01-09-2010, 06:19 PM
  #121
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Allison Finch    
This is a video of a Jim Briggs clinic. It shows him using very patient positive reinforcement on a horse afraid of water on XC. But, this pony was a run away boy on XC. So Jim, knowing how dangerous it can be got on and performed a calvary stop on him at approx 1:59. Jim is strong and laid it on him. The horse was so surprised he went down. That is hoe effective it is. You don't have to be very strong to make it work. NOW, the difference between this stop and the oft incorrectly used one rein stop, is that the horse went down straight, now falling on his side and rolling. That is an important difference. He went straight down. After a little schooling, the horse "got it". At the end, you see this kid confidently galloping this same horse, knowing they could stop together afterwards. Good video, IMO.

YouTube - Jim Briggs/Sandi Farris Camp 2009


Jim's training is very gentle and supportive. However, a horse MUST be stoppable to be safe. I agree, to a point, with all the posters, here. Riosdad is correct that this must be fixed. If a couple of calvary/emergency stops is what it takes, so be it. Both human and horse will benefit from this communication.

I also agree with spanking (not beating)kids who refuse to comply with directives (especially where safety is concerned). My bad!!
Whoa! How does one go about doing that, anyway?
     
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    01-09-2010, 07:00 PM
  #122
Super Moderator
On page #9, post #87, I posted a video teaching how to do the emergency/calvary stop.
     
    01-09-2010, 07:56 PM
  #123
Green Broke
Mkay. *goes to take a look*
     
    01-09-2010, 10:39 PM
  #124
Trained
I'm with RiosDad on this one. I rarely like the way he says things, but the information he is giving out is good stuff. If a horse runs away with you, any horse, under any circumstance [well, if a bear jumps out of the woods, I'll let him run] the horse MUST stop, period. If I were riding a known runner, I would work tons of transitions in the arena, and when I think we're ready to go out in the open where he usually runs away, I WILL use a big bad bit, one that he's had on before, and you betcha if that horse tries to take off, his rear will be hauled to the ground so quickly, his head will spin. Stop means stop means stop means stop. I don't care if he's scared of a stick, he and I are both a lot safer if he stops. Running away is a very, very dangerous habit, I'm not going to fool around with it.

As far as the poster with the "crazy" re-trained horse. There is no way for you to know that the horse couldn't have been re-trained by RiosDad, or myself, or any other member on here. All you know is that the people around you didn't want her. There are a thousand ways to solve problems in a horse. Yes, some are more abusive than others, and some people just create more problems, but that still leaves a couple hundred ways to fix the same problem in the same horse.

If you want to talk about previously abused horses, most people who take in abused horses aren't going to throw it around and use force to re-train it. I plan on taking in rescues in the future, but I will not let it walk all over me just because it has a bad past. If it goes to take a bite out of me, it will get punished for it. If it tries to run me over while on the lead rope, it will get pushed back and it will learn real quick that I am boss, period. Maybe I wouldn't handle the situation in the same way I would another "normal" horse, but I won't let it take a chunk out of me or run me over just because "him's got scared of someting, and him's didn't do it on purpose, and him's been beaten before." Take what you will from that. But I can make a great horse and establish a great partnership. There is always an alpha in the herd, and I have no problems working with the horse, but I am still alpha.
     
    01-09-2010, 10:42 PM
  #125
Green Broke
I use a curb on Sunny literally for my safety and his. Do I like it? Not particularily. But it's what I have to do.

So as far as curbs go, I use one when I have to.
     
    01-09-2010, 11:00 PM
  #126
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by riccil0ve    
I'm with RiosDad on this one. I rarely like the way he says things, but the information he is giving out is good stuff. .
Thank you riccilove. I call a spade a spade and don't sugar coat it.
I watched the new show, the Dog Whisperer? Some of you might be familiar with it?? Being a dog trainer myself I see alot of things most of you might not but beleive me he takes time outs, he takes the dog off camera and they have a few serious discussions and then he comes back on and you see what he wants you to see. I watched the use, the hard use of a spike collar today and the use of a 4 or 5 foot long pole to demand obedience on a large dog.. It is not all sugar and spice, there is time out behind the barn so to speak.
Again thank you riccil0ve for the kind words.
Have a nice night
     
    01-09-2010, 11:19 PM
  #127
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by RiosDad    
Thank you riccilove. I call a spade a spade and don't sugar coat it.
I watched the new show, the Dog Whisperer? Some of you might be familiar with it?? Being a dog trainer myself I see alot of things most of you might not but beleive me he takes time outs, he takes the dog off camera and they have a few serious discussions and then he comes back on and you see what he wants you to see. I watched the use, the hard use of a spike collar today and the use of a 4 or 5 foot long pole to demand obedience on a large dog.. It is not all sugar and spice, there is time out behind the barn so to speak.
Again thank you riccil0ve for the kind words.
Have a nice night
Most situations I will try to work it out in other ways, but there are times when wrong is just wrong. You run, and I stop. You bite and I hit. You rear and you get a fist on the top of your head. Then I'll go back and see what caused the behavior, but I'm not about to let a horse get away with anything that isn't absolutely necessary.

I try not to get too rough with dogs. As it typically takes a lot to make a horse aggressive, it doesn't take nearly as much for a dog, lol. I'd rather be bitten by a horse than a dog. =P However, I do see why you would relate the two. Training is training, no matter what species.

And your welcome. =]
     
    01-09-2010, 11:26 PM
  #128
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spirithorse    
You are all about the result. You don't care about how the horse feels about a situation, and you really don't understand how a prey animal thinks. Even the most mellow horse is still a prey animal, and if you forget that, you are going to get seriously hurt. Oh, and I didn't break my warmblood....I re-started him....there is a big difference between 'breaking' a horse and 'starting or re-starting' him. And I've worked with plenty horses who are spoiled brats and scared messes and I get results quickly...and not because I inflict pain on them.

You treat horses like dogs? You are dealing with two difference species who think NOTHING alike. Dogs are predators, horses are prey animals. If you can't understand the difference in their thoght processes you shouldn't be working with horses. Maybe stick with your dogs.
Considering he's been working with horses for over fifty years, that ship has long sailed and you've obviously been proven wrong in the fact that he's still alive, not crippled and still working with horses.

Your method isn't the only method that exists. Just because RiosDad finds a different path doesn't make it abusive or wrong just because you say so. I try to respect you, but the thought of a kid trying to tell an old cowboy and trainer how to do his business makes it really hard. Open your mind a bit and try not to be so judgemental towards others who's animals are just as sassy and happy as yours are.
     
    01-10-2010, 01:09 AM
  #129
Started
I personally don't care if someone has been dealing with horses for 50 years. If the person uses force and pain to make the horse comply I don't have any respect for them. No horse should have pain inflicted on them like that, there are MUCH better ways, and I'm not just talking about the way I chose to do things.
     
    01-10-2010, 01:13 AM
  #130
Started
Seeing as I've dealt with barn sour horses before (both fearful and "stubborn" horses) this is an easy issue to solve. If the horse is fearful it's all about working on his thresholds. Approach and retreat, building his confidence in me so that he feels safe to go where I ask him. Pushing him to the limit, but not over it. If the horse is stubborn, it's a matter of getting the horse to WANT to go...to put effort into going where I ask. I would usually start on the ground and build a relationship and build rapport, but since you've allowed me just the weekend I would simply reward the slightest try. He takes a step in that direction, praise (or grazing spot). Work around in the area where he is ok with, going forward when I ask, etc. until he is willing. Ask a lot, accept a little, reward often.
     

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