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Galloping & One Rein Stop

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  • Cueing horse to gallop site:www.horseforum.com

 
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    01-07-2010, 11:29 AM
  #21
Banned
Check out this link.
The horse here Shadow was a bad character. He had been sent out for training by the previous owner with no luck. He continued to buck, to runaway and refused to be broke.
He had 100's of miles under him and still he was almost impossible to mount alone and refused to submit.
This is the day he submitted and never caused a problem again.
This is all I did, a short video taken by someone watching but this was the end of him being a jerk and I wear no spurs or carry a whip. The only thing I have is the curb.. He stayed in this for a few weeks and then dropped to a mild training curb.
Norval

Strider is my old endurance horse
     
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    01-07-2010, 11:34 AM
  #22
Foal
From what I read it sounds like the horse decides to gallop on his own and then chooses not to listen when he is asked to slow down or stop. Both are bad choices for sure.

When a horse gallops his adrenaline is rushing and his heart rate triples to provide the muscles with the oxygen needed by his muscles.

Usually this is the time-high levels of adrenaline-that the horse "forgets" about the rider and starts to choose on his own.

The side of the road is definitely not the place to solve the problem. Either one of the both of you will get hurt or worse in that environment. I would suggest that you do not ride on the side of the road until you can solve the problem.

You said that you also ride in an arena--hopefully with good footing and such--and that is the place to work on the problem.

You need to solve the problem--him not listening when his adrenaline gets up--so focus on that instead of the "not stopping" as this is just the symptom of the real problem.

There are lots of ways to accomplish this in the arena. Gain control of his feet when his adrenaline is high and the problem is solved. I wish I could tell you specifically what to do but without working with you and your horse I can't.

Find a good instructor/trainer and let them help you. This will be a lot less expensive than the vet bills and the doctor bills that are waiting for you.
     
    01-07-2010, 11:35 AM
  #23
Yearling
Just read you post Riosdad. I have to say that I try not to take things the way you do, such as when you said, you pull with everything you got whether or not it hurts them. But...sometimes when I get really mad, I find myself doing that...I'm glad you brought that up first because I didn't want anyone to 'pound' me for it lol.
     
    01-07-2010, 11:38 AM
  #24
Showing
Rio, have you looked carefully at the picture you pointed to as being the right setup? Take a careful look. I wouldn't want a horse of mine looking like that.

As for using a curb, I don't see a problem with it and use one on all my horses but I know how to use one. To put one in the hands of someone who doesn't have a clue is irresponsible.

I'm in my 60's, I've been riding over 50 years and training for over 30. Harsh bits only lead to harsher bits without education. If that works for you, all well and good but it isn't my method. I've had trail horses come to me with bolting problems and each and every one has left without the problem and ridden in a snaffle. I like a curb for the finesse I can get with one - not for the "stop" many riders use it for.
     
    01-07-2010, 11:46 AM
  #25
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by PechosGoldenChance    
Just read you post Riosdad. I have to say that I try not to take things the way you do, such as when you said, you pull with everything you got whether or not it hurts them. But...sometimes when I get really mad, I find myself doing that...I'm glad you brought that up first because I didn't want anyone to 'pound' me for it lol.
Sometimes you need to channel your anger into strength, into courage to do what is needed. This horse outweighs you by 10 times, he is probably 20 times stronger then you so you need all the advantage you can find and anger can come to your aid.
I am not angry, I have it worked out before hand, I am not afraid but I use my shoulders, my back my legs and really shut him down hard and fast. The little pain helps him remember in future and honestly it makes them lighter in the end. They remember and they listen to the suttle cue's if IF they experience something harsh after failing to react to the suttle cue.

I ride extremelly soft, no contact, suttle cue's because BECAUSE the horse knows that following the suttle cue's will be a harsh one.
This is not theory speaking, this is experience.

You can reason all you want with a horse but when the time comes, something spooks him, he feels spring in his blood, whatever it then comes down to who is actually the stronger.. And I don't mean strength. The bond between my horse and me is forged and he listens no matter what.
     
    01-07-2010, 11:49 AM
  #26
Green Broke
Where as you are a great confident, strong, rider, N, to the op who quite obviously(no offense) is not, I recommend that you get a trainer to help you out.

And please do not take your uncontrollable horse near the road! Disaster waiting to happen.
     
    01-07-2010, 11:52 AM
  #27
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by iridehorses    
Rio, have you looked carefully at the picture you pointed to as being the right setup? Take a careful look. I wouldn't want a horse of mine looking like that.

.
I don't know the girl and only posted the picture showing a little girl, no real strength and a curb bit.
Please do not insult her or her setup.

Insult me if you want but not her.

I personally ride in a snaffle but I have the experience and the strength if needed.
You are going to argue the STRENGTH and most think it is not need, you will use ground work, finess but in the end strength plays a bigger part.
If the horse goes into a buck spree, if the horse rears, if the horse spins and runs, if the horse refuses to go forward. It all boils down to , Do you have a good enough seat to ride anything out, do you have the strength both experience and physical strength to make the horse behave.
I will fight if the horse so chooses, I will not reason.

This post is about what to do to stop the horse while galloping??
I suggest a curb bit with a curb chain.
     
    01-07-2010, 12:02 PM
  #28
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by Honeysuga    
Where as you are a great confident, strong, rider, N, to the op who quite obviously(no offense) is not, I recommend that you get a trainer to help you out.

And please do not take your uncontrollable horse near the road! Disaster waiting to happen.
I assume the OP is not a strong rider thus the use of the curb to increase her strength.
To me a rider using a snaffle and having the horse put his head up high and run is one of the most frightening experience with a horse that you can have.
A running martingale doubles DOUBLES the power of a snaffle and yet does nothing when the horse behaves
     
    01-07-2010, 12:17 PM
  #29
Yearling
I think that method works for RiosDad because he is experienced. But trying that if you are not can set up some big problems. In my very limited experience I have seen numerous running horses, who have their adrenaline up, start to buck pretty hard if the rider tries to stop them. I have to agree, maybe time for a couple months with a trainer. Although my horse is making great progress I plan to send him to a trainer this winter. It is better than the hospital bill.
     
    01-07-2010, 01:00 PM
  #30
mls
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by RiosDad    
I don't know the girl and only posted the picture showing a little girl, no real strength and a curb bit.
Please do not insult her or her setup.

Insult me if you want but not her.
I agree with Iride - you posted the photo and told all of us it was a good setup. We are not insulting the girl - we are disagreeing with your opinion that it's a good set up. Thank you Iride - I wanted to disagree with the opinion also.

Also - a curb bit can become ineffective VERY quickly when the horse grabs the shank.
     

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