Galloping & One Rein Stop - Page 5
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Horse Training

Galloping & One Rein Stop

This is a discussion on Galloping & One Rein Stop within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        01-07-2010, 04:06 PM
      #41
    Trained
    ^^^You couldn't have said it better. At least one ego is fixing to explode.
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        01-07-2010, 04:13 PM
      #42
    Showing
    Yes, I think this thread is about to blow itself up
         
        01-07-2010, 04:16 PM
      #43
    Showing
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by PaintsPwn    
    As far as giving that advice on this board that you almost flip a horse over? Jesus! I've not heard something that outrageous since someone on another forum suggested punching a horse in the nose with a nail for biting, and when that member suggested chain bits 'weren't really that bad'. Thankfully, I'm pretty sure no one on this forum is going to try that.
    I'm not sure if this is directed at me, as I didn't read all of the replies, and the quote wasn't to clear... but if it was (as I did mention a horse rearing and flipping) .. I've seen more than one horse react poorly to the incorrect introduction of a curb bit. When done improperly, I.e. An inexperienced rider putting a horse in a curb for the first time to try and get a better brake, could result in a horse reacting badly.
    Anyways, I'm rambling.
         
        01-07-2010, 04:20 PM
      #44
    Foal
    Try riding in a round pen no less than 60.' You can do this in an arena as well, but the round pen allows you to not worry about where your horse is going so you can relax better. It also has the effect of sucking the energy out of your horse as he realizes he has no where to go.

    Your horse has to learn to control his emotion. This is what a lot of people do not do. They try to keep everything quiet and calm and thus when the horse gets his emotions up he has no idea how to function.

    While riding in the pen push your horse to the speed where he STARTS to get emotional. If he cannot stay calm at an extended trot, start there. If he cannot extend the walk without tensing, start there. And remember walk work only makes the walk better, trot work makes the walk and trot better, and lope work makes all gaits better.

    As soon as his head goes up, you feel him tense up or you feel him start to pull on the bit, slow him down. Keep pushing him just to the point he thinks about being scared and back him down. Continue at the slowest gait he has problems and move to the next and continue the process.

    You can also find other areas to work on his emotional control such as sacking out, and lots of in hand work. The more places you can push him up and bring him down emotionally the better he will get in all areas.
         
        01-07-2010, 04:22 PM
      #45
    Showing
    Excellent advise by ReiningTrainer.
         
        01-07-2010, 04:45 PM
      #46
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by RiosDad    
    I only buy 3-5 year old stud colts unbroken and usually unhandled. Within the week they are a totally different horse. I don't whip them, I don't beat on them but I do demand that from the moment I unload them from the trailer they begin acting like a finished horse.
    No horse has beaten me yet. I too had one go up and over trying to pin me. Hard on the saddle but nothing else. That time I had 1 hour to break and test ride a 7 year old unhandled stallion. One hour and never a bit of training on him before that time. I did ride him around a pasture, unsaddled , said no thank you and left.
    Honestly, if you ONLY buy 3-5 year old unbroken and usually unhandled stud colts it sounds like you get off on danger, on the bragging rights of breaking supposedly unbreakable animals. The fact that you think that your relationships with horses are about winning or being "beaten" is a little twisted. I agree that horses need to see you as the dominant one in the relationship, but I view riding is a partnership, not a dictatorship.

    As for the OP, I agree with a lot of what's been said about working on transitions and softness at the w/t/c. If you get your horse more responsive at the lower gaits, that should translate to the gallop. I've galloped horses before that love to run and lose their head a little when they do. What I do is half halt them until I can feel them start to pay attention, and then really sit back and use the deepness of my seat to signal them that we are going to transition downward (which has the extra added benefit of keeping me onboard if they decide to slam on the brakes) and then ask for my downward transition.

    As for throwing in a curb: I'm probably repeating a lot of what people have been already been saying, but if the horse is properly responsive at the w/t/c with a snaffle, there should be no reason to ride in a curb just because you plan on galloping them.
         
        01-07-2010, 06:17 PM
      #47
    Weanling
    Well okay. Let me clear a few things up. It's not that he randomly BOLTS AWAY with me. He would never do that. He never has. That was taken out of context. He is not this dangerous, uncontrollable horse that some of you are making him out to be. He is the most bombproof, deadhead horse I've ever seen on the road. Nothing phases him. Rather, I am saying that when I ASK him to gallop, he does not like to stop. The whole chasing the car thing was a one-time experience. I asked him to trot/canter next to it, and we were not on the pavement. It was 100% my fault. I know this.

    RiosDad, I am not going to traumatize my horse by putting a harsh bit in his mouth and then yanking on his face as hard as I can. Sorry, but that's just cruel. He was abused in the past and is already wary enough of it. I want him to accept the bit, not fear it. I also would rather have a horse with its jawbone intact when I am finished.
    I have tried a mild curb bit. The first time he felt it (in the arena, where he is quiet) he almost reared up. No thanks.

    He stops on a DIME at the walk and trot, and is nearly there at the canter. Mind you, this is with the subtlest movement of seat and ONE finger. There is no brace. He is very soft at walk/trot. Reading ReiningTrainer's post, I can see where you're coming from and that's honestly the best advice I've read thus far. He does brace at the canter. I will continue working with him there.

    However. The ONLY time I have problems with him is on the road or an open field. He is very soft in the arena, and never gets "out of control" or loses focus in there. Only out in the open.
         
        01-07-2010, 06:25 PM
      #48
    Showing
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Ne0n Zero    
    Well okay. Let me clear a few things up. It's not that he randomly BOLTS AWAY with me. He would never do that. He never has. That was taken out of context. He is not this dangerous, uncontrollable horse that some of you are making him out to be. He is the most bombproof, deadhead horse I've ever seen on the road. Nothing phases him. Rather, I am saying that when I ASK him to gallop, he does not like to stop. The whole chasing the car thing was a one-time experience. I asked him to trot/canter next to it, and we were not on the pavement. It was 100% my fault. I know this.

    RiosDad, I am not going to traumatize my horse by putting a harsh bit in his mouth and then yanking on his face as hard as I can. Sorry, but that's just cruel. He was abused in the past and is already wary enough of it. I want him to accept the bit, not fear it. I also would rather have a horse with its jawbone intact when I am finished.
    I have tried a mild curb bit. The first time he felt it (in the arena, where he is quiet) he almost reared up. No thanks.

    He stops on a DIME at the walk and trot, and is nearly there at the canter. Mind you, this is with the subtlest movement of seat and ONE finger. There is no brace. He is very soft at walk/trot. Reading ReiningTrainer's post, I can see where you're coming from and that's honestly the best advice I've read thus far. He does brace at the canter. I will continue working with him there.

    However. The ONLY time I have problems with him is on the road or an open field. He is very soft in the arena, and never gets "out of control" or loses focus in there. Only out in the open.
    Is this when you are going toward or away from home? If its when your going toward home then I would suggest when you feel him starting to speed up turn him in the opposite direction for a minute then turn back. I keep Vida at a walkor slow gait (shes gaited) only when we are heading for home. We can run away from home but never toward it.
         
        01-07-2010, 06:29 PM
      #49
    Trained
    My first advice still holds. Let him run and when it is his idea to slow down make him go a little more and then ask him to stop. This way you both have the same idea at the same time which is really the goal of riding anyway.
         
        01-07-2010, 06:30 PM
      #50
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Vidaloco    
    Is this when you are going toward or away from home? If its when your going toward home then I would suggest when you feel him starting to speed up turn him in the opposite direction for a minute then turn back. I keep Vida at a walkor slow gait (shes gaited) only when we are heading for home. We can run away from home but never toward it.
    No, direction most definitely doesn't matter with him. I don't let him run home. When we ride down to the corner store I sometimes let him run in the open fields. I CAN get him to stop before the field ends, just not very easily. I'd say I have to start trying to slow him down after about 3/4 of the field.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by kevinshorses    
    My first advice still holds. Let him run and when it is his idea to slow down make him go a little more and then ask him to stop. This way you both have the same idea at the same time which is really the goal of riding anyway.
    If I had the room for that, I would.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by RomanticLyric    
    Honestly, if you ONLY buy 3-5 year old unbroken and usually unhandled stud colts it sounds like you get off on danger, on the bragging rights of breaking supposedly unbreakable animals. The fact that you think that your relationships with horses are about winning or being "beaten" is a little twisted. I agree that horses need to see you as the dominant one in the relationship, but I view riding is a partnership, not a dictatorship.

    As for the OP, I agree with a lot of what's been said about working on transitions and softness at the w/t/c. If you get your horse more responsive at the lower gaits, that should translate to the gallop. I've galloped horses before that love to run and lose their head a little when they do. What I do is half halt them until I can feel them start to pay attention, and then really sit back and use the deepness of my seat to signal them that we are going to transition downward (which has the extra added benefit of keeping me onboard if they decide to slam on the brakes) and then ask for my downward transition.

    As for throwing in a curb: I'm probably repeating a lot of what people have been already been saying, but if the horse is properly responsive at the w/t/c with a snaffle, there should be no reason to ride in a curb just because you plan on galloping them.
    Thank you.
         

    Quick Reply
    Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
    Message:
    Options

    Register Now

    In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

    Already have a Horse Forum account?
    Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

    New to the Horse Forum?
    Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

    User Name:
    Password
    Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
    Password:
    Confirm Password:
    Email Address
    Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
    Email Address:

    Log-in

    Human Verification

    In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


    Old Thread Warning
    This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

    Thread Tools

    Similar Threads
    Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
    Galloping? HorseLover123 Horse Riding 12 08-02-2009 09:14 PM
    What is a "one rein stop"? RiddlesDarkAngel5 Horse Riding 25 07-01-2009 10:02 PM
    The One-rein stop RedHawk Horse Videos 2 02-17-2009 06:38 PM
    One rein stop Vidaloco Horse Videos 12 01-18-2009 08:32 PM
    One-rein stop kitten_Val Horse Training 3 02-19-2008 10:27 AM



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:44 AM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0