Galloping out of control
   

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Galloping out of control

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  • How to control your horse while galloping
  • How to control a galloping horse

 
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    03-14-2009, 10:50 AM
  #1
Weanling
Galloping out of control

My friend has a 17yo TB who as most do, loves to run.
When my horse canters past him, he sometimes will bolt after him and ignores my friend asking him to stop.
He flips his head around and continually gets faster.

So I'm assuming this is part of a training issue.. what should she do?
     
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    03-14-2009, 11:48 AM
  #2
Weanling
If it were me, I would try to keep the horse's head in an inside bend and try to train/practice lateral work (Leg Yields, Half Passes, etc) to get him thinking in more dimensions =) Circles also work nicely. When a horse has his neck and head in his own control, there is no stopping him. You WILL lose! LOL! Nothing is stronger on your entire body than that neck of his is.

Worse comes to worse, your friend could execute a "one rein stop" In which she takes her inside rein and sharply pulls it back to try to get that neck to bend. BUT.. a word of caution.. if a horse is in a full gallop and you snap at the rein like that and the horse suddenly turns his neck, he could fall over. I usually yell in a deep mean voice "WOAH" or "HO" or a lengthier one like WOOOAH and HOOO.. as I do the one rein.. so he knows its coming. I have only used the one rein stop 3 or 4 times. I really try to avoid it. Make sure the bit fits properly.. because if she is riding him in a loose ring snaffle and the noseband isnt there, or isnt on right, the bit might just go right through his mouth and she'll be in HUGE trouble. A Full Cheek snaffle works nicely!

What kind of bit is he using? If it is just a simple loose ring snaffle or eggbutt, I -MIGHT- recommend upgrading.. but that's really not something I have authority to tell you to change, since I don't know this particular horse or rider. If your friend really thinks it may be the hardware he is blowing through, get some advice from a local well respected trainer. Don't just run out and buy a mean bit. We need to make sure that this is in no way a rider error.

I have had to upgrade horses bits in the past, and once I get them responsive, I go back to a Full Cheek Snaffle. There is only ONE situation where I didn't and that was with Skippy!. But, the upgrade was from a D Ring Snaffle to a Tom Thumb. We switched him to a curb bit (mind you, it has a snaffle mouth, no port, etc) because he was much more respectful of it.

I only ride my horses in tom thumbs (or tom thumb style leverage bits/curb bits) and snaffles (most extreme being a snaffle mouth Kimberwick, for leverage in an english setting). If I need more than that, i've probably done something wrong in training! =)

((as a disclaimer, I train horses for the lower levels of dressage and I do a lot of green breaking/bomb proofing to make good trail horses. That's why those bits work so well for me. I can acheive everything I need to achieve by using those bits.))

I hope this helps!
     
    03-14-2009, 11:51 AM
  #3
Weanling
Even if she pulls his head around and uses leg, he'll just gallop with his head bent to one side |:
But yes that was helpful.
     
    03-14-2009, 11:56 AM
  #4
Trained
Yeah - because he pops his shoulder and evades.

The Eventers 1 rein stop is effective - but it is only a quick fix, where this horse in question needs to be brought to basics and the holes in the training scale needs to be focused on.

But the eventers 1 rein stop is sorta the same idea, but you do not allow the horses head to turn, whatsoever.

By getting a good contact with one rein, digging your knuckles into their withers, while pulling the other rein to your shoulder - you stop the horse dead in their tracks. Horse cannot turn head at all. But again - quick fix, not a remedy.

Bitting up - again - quick fix, not a remedy.

Only going back to the arena and learning how to do correct, through flat work.

This is something that needs a quallified, educated coach to aid your friend with.
     
    03-14-2009, 12:00 PM
  #5
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by MIEventer    
Yeah - because he pops his shoulder and evades.

The Eventers 1 rein stop is effective - but it is only a quick fix, where this horse in question needs to be brought to basics and the holes in the training scale needs to be focused on.

But the eventers 1 rein stop is sorta the same idea, but you do not allow the horses head to turn, whatsoever.

By getting a good contact with one rein, digging your knuckles into their withers, while pulling the other rein to your shoulder - you stop the horse dead in their tracks. Horse cannot turn head at all. But again - quick fix, not a remedy.

Bitting up - again - quick fix, not a remedy.

Only going back to the arena and learning how to do correct, through flat work.

This is something that needs a quallified, educated coach to aid your friend with.
Yes, When I am talking about the one rein stop, I meant for the horses head to nearly be looking at his rump. I use the first tug to get him bent, then draw that rein tighter until he HAS to stop.

Just asking for a bend will result in him throwing that shoulder out and he'll run through the bit.

I love Flatwork :> I wish I had an arena to ride in again =/
     
    03-15-2009, 03:43 AM
  #6
Trained
Hi,

You don't say whether he's an OTTB, but even if not, cantering past another horse like that is quite provocative. I would first suggest not doing that with any horse of whom you're unsure about the rider's control - such as this friend. I would suggest to your friend not to go out in situations like this until her horse is well trained enough to be safely controllable.

I would also suggest she teaches him the 'one rein stop'. I suggest it be started in an enclosed, safe area such as paddock, yard or arena, so your friend has no fear of being run away with. She needs to teach him to do it on either side, walk, trot, canter, then introduce distractions, such as yourself hooning past and get him reliably listening to her in that setting, before *gradually* working from easy stuff to what you've described in other environments like on the trail.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Skippy!    
Worse comes to worse, your friend could execute a "one rein stop" In which she takes her inside rein and sharply pulls it back to try to get that neck to bend. BUT.. a word of caution.. if a horse is in a full gallop and you snap at the rein like that
Sorry Skippy, but IMHO this is NOT a 'one rein stop' and it is a really dangerous - and unnecessarily hurtful to the horse - practice. It is not at all about 'sharply' 'snapping' a horse's head around. It is about TRAINING the horse to YIELD(respond to SOFT pressure) it's head around AND disengage his hindquarters(the important bit for control). It is about doing it so often, at standstill, walk, trot & then canter, that the horse doesn't even have to think about it, just does it. Only when it's well 'programmed' is it useful & safe in an emergency situation.

Quote:
I only ride my horses in tom thumbs (or tom thumb style leverage bits/curb bits) and snaffles (most extreme being a snaffle mouth Kimberwick, for leverage in an english setting). If I need more than that, i've probably done something wrong in training! =)
Tom thumbs & the likes can be extremely harsh. Snaffles, if used with equal pressure on both reins can be quite severe, having the ability to 'nutcracker' the tongue and gouge the roof of the mouth. All bits can be painful if used strongly.

IMO control is always about training, never the choice of bit(from the perspective of how much pain it can create). You don't need to create more pain to control, you just need to learn how to teach the horse effectively & put in the time & effort it takes. I will not put any bit in a horse's mouth, until after he has been trained to yield reliably without it, so that the bit can then be used for refined, gentle communication. I train in a halter or bosal & consider that if I ever needed more than that, i've probably done something wrong in training.
     
    03-15-2009, 07:15 AM
  #7
Weanling
Thank you for your input :>
     
    03-15-2009, 07:28 AM
  #8
Showing
This is a nice video on the One Rein Stop


BTW, ANY horse that gets past at a canter by an ignorant rider will cause that horse to think "OMG!!! Something is chasing that horse - I better get the heck out of here too".

One of the most important rules for trail riding is never to pass another horse at anything more then what gait that rider is at. It is simply inviting a problem. No matter how well trained your horse may be, another horse cantering past usually provokes either the flight or the competitive instinct in your horse.
     
    03-15-2009, 06:01 PM
  #9
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by iridehorses    
One of the most important rules for trail riding is never to pass another horse at anything more then what gait that rider is at. It is simply inviting a problem. No matter how well trained your horse may be, another horse cantering past usually provokes either the flight or the competitive instinct in your horse.
Exactly.
My best advice would be to stop putting the horse in that type of situation to begin with.
My big grey gelding does the exact same thing. If someone comes whipping past him, he usually lets out a big buck and goes from 0 to 60 in 2 seconds. It's an instinctive reaction. And its also dangerous, because it can get out of control.

So, if you know this horse has a problem with this, simple remedy-stop doing it ;)
     
    03-15-2009, 07:05 PM
  #10
Weanling
The great thing about Trail Etiquette is... when you encounter someone on the trail that DOESN'T follow it, lol!

I agree with being pro-active and doing your best to avoid those situations out on the trail, but on the other hand, you didn't mention on the original post about where this situation takes place. I know with my horses, if its a problem on the trail, its a problem in the arena too =/

If that's the case, i'd still really recommend your friend do some work with her horse in the arena, as it will be a more controlled environment. Whenever I train a breen broke horse, I go out of my way to -find- trouble to ride in (windy days, around shows, while horses are running in turn out) because its really valuable training experience to get a young horse to focus. There are times to ride in a quiet arena with no one else out at the barn, but most of the time I like riding in chaos to nip problems like these in the bud :p if that makes sense. My horses are very, very bombproof. Not much scares them.

Infact, a buddy of mine rented one of those "Wacky Waving Inflatable Arm Flailing Tube Men" for his tack store, and I actually borrowed it before he had to return it so I could ride my horses around it. Surprisingly, they didnt mind it TOO much at first, but before long I was standing underneith it and the arms were flappin' on them and they couldnt care less, lol!

So make sure your friend still tries to do something proactive about this problem, not just trying to avoid it... since the situation may/will happen again, no matter how hard ya try to avoid it ^^ Make sure that she works with her horse under the guidance of a knowledgable and respected horse trainer/instructor/person =)

Again, best of luck to your friend! =)
     

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