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Gelding = attitude change?

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  • Fix a gelding that actslike a stud
  • Did horse's attitude change after he moved from a stall to a pasture?

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    05-25-2013, 10:26 AM
  #11
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by toto    
It depends on the horse- the ones I've seen that were gelded that late in life didnt really know anything different than to act like a stud.. I think the younger the better.

If he's hyper its probably because of the poor training he has got as a race horse-- he's been trained to run- not be a pleasureable riding animal-- gelding him will not fix his training flaws!

If he throws correctly put together foals with a good calm nature- id keep him a stud and market him that way. --my opinion.
I understand that gelding him won't fix training flaws. I wasn't thinking I could get him cut then put a saddle on him the next day.

He throws beautiful foals BUT there are so many thoroughbreds out there right now that I can't justify making more. Plus he was only raced to 5 years old and didn't have a chance to win much so no one in the race industry would look twice at him. We've put out adds to sell him over the last year and had no takers. My decision to geld him is mostly to make his life better. I hate seeing him alone in that pasture. He's been there for 10 years. I just didn't know if there was even the possibility of ever riding him.

Thanks for all the replies. I think I'll geld him for sure then take it from there. Worse case is he won't be rideable but will be able to be turned out with the geldings. Great advice to turn him out when he is still feeling a little "under the weather". I'll try that for sure.

Oh I also wanted to say that he is not aggressive. He is pretty well mannered for a stallion who is only handled a couple times a year. We had to move him to the barn yesterday to switch some mares around and he walked really good for hubby who had to walk him by a fence with 2 mares. He hollered but he didn't act up.
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    05-25-2013, 01:07 PM
  #12
Started
My question would be why wait? You know it's in his best interest and would make things easier all the way around so do it now. Geld him and get him riding immediately. He'll just be a year older if you wait until next spring. He won't have any herd skills so expect some cuts and scrapes. I've never met an OTTB who had a clue how to act in a herd at the start.

Hopefully you will be pleasantly surprised with what he does know once you get on him. I have found them easy to retain but they typically have only sat for 3-4 months after finishing their racing careers not 12 years.
     
    05-25-2013, 02:24 PM
  #13
Yearling
He will be 'proud cut' being gelded that old but sometimes that's a problem and sometimes it isn't. My gelding is proud cut and he's generally easy to work with. He's territorial though and does not tolerate other horses in his food, stall, space etc. but that's the only difference between him and any other gelding.
     
    05-25-2013, 04:16 PM
  #14
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Left Hand Percherons    
My question would be why wait? You know it's in his best interest and would make things easier all the way around so do it now. Geld him and get him riding immediately. He'll just be a year older if you wait until next spring. He won't have any herd skills so expect some cuts and scrapes. I've never met an OTTB who had a clue how to act in a herd at the start.

Hopefully you will be pleasantly surprised with what he does know once you get on him. I have found them easy to retain but they typically have only sat for 3-4 months after finishing their racing careers not 12 years.

Sorry I didn't make that more clear. I DO plan on gelding him this year. I just don't plan on riding him this year. I'd like to do some ground work and assess his attitude before climbing on his back.

All of the horses on the place are TBs. Broods, the stud, some off the track. So thankfully I have a little experience with them. I'm thinking I'll put the two geldings in the pasture next to the stud the day (or so) after he's gelded so they can meet with a fence between them. Then in another day or so I'll put them all together (making sure that all mares are WAAAAY across the property).

I'm not sure at all what I'll get after he's gelded. He may be gentle like his son was or he may be a butt head. Either way, at least we won't have to worry about him getting out and making babies (my grandfather isn't great at getting gates shut :P ). Thanks for all the replies guys. I'll post updates on how he does.

His appointment is for June 14th. He'll get his teeth checked/floated too.
     
    05-25-2013, 04:35 PM
  #15
Yearling
It will take 30 days for the residual testosterone to leave his system. So be careful and treat him like he's still intact for a week or two. Exercise is good for him, but if he's not nice to other horses he needs to stay by himself for a little while after surgery.
     
    05-25-2013, 07:54 PM
  #16
Weanling
Thank you I will keep that in mind. This is why I'd like to introduce him to the geldings across the fence first. I've never seen him around other horses. He's been across the fence from others when he's gotten out of his pasture but I've never seen him in with others. He didn't fight across the fence though... The last thing I want to do is cause him a problem while healing or risk injury to him or my other horses. My end goal, for this year, would be to have him living with the other 2 geldings by winter and him having really good ground manners.
     
    05-25-2013, 08:58 PM
  #17
Super Moderator
Quote:
He will be 'proud cut' being gelded that old
We simply have not found this to be the case. We have had few proud cut geldings at all and the worst ones we have had were gelded at 2 or younger. There were 3 or 4 that we have had that would actually 'cover' a mare in heat. Two were so bad that we had blood drawn and Testosterone levels checked. We were sure one just had to have a retained testicle as you could hand breed him. Blood levels came back normal. The Vet school we took the one to (Colorado State you.) said that some geldings are just that way and they did not have an explanation for it. That was the last time I have paid for blood tests on any gelding.

Quote:
It will take 30 days for the residual testosterone to leave his system.
This is just not true. When you turn studs in together or turn them in with geldings, their Testosterone levels drop within 48 hours.

Quote:
he needs to stay by himself for a little while after surgery.
This is why many horses do not socialize well after gelding. You need to put them together (with no mares) as soon as there is no danger of them bleeding. I had one break open and bleed -- a lot -- when I put them together right away. One day separated seems to work very well.

The old thinking that stallions needed to get the Testosterone out of their blood has been proved a myth. We always thought it was a myth because, like other big ranches, we would run stallions together and with geldings during the fall and winter. Then, a Vet School, (I believe it was Texas A & M) wondered how big ranches could turn all their studs in together when they came out of the pastures in late summer without them killing each other. They went to some of the biggest ranches in Texas and did blood studies. They pulled blood the day they were taken out of the mare herds. They were turned in together and blood taken every 24 hours. They found that Testosterone levels dropped almost to the same level as most geldings within 48 hours. When we have turned them all in together, we have found that within 2 days, our studs quit grunting at each other and acted like a pen of geldings. We have had studs become 'herd-bound' buddies.

Like I said before, the whole key to gelding mature stallions is to geld them and get them in with gelding as quickly as possible, preferably when they are still sore and feeling sorry for themselves. If it is practical, we like to turn them in with geldings before they are cut. Just don't put mares across a fence from them.
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    05-25-2013, 11:38 PM
  #18
Yearling
If fighting with others was one of his stallion behaviors, he needs to stay separated for a while to avoid hurting himself.

And, that is not a myth. Gelding surgery does not fix the horse over night.
     
    05-26-2013, 07:34 AM
  #19
Super Moderator
It IS a myth. If that were true, big ranches could not turn their studs in together. Big ranches have always handled their studs just like they handled their bulls. They have a stud pasture with no mares across the fence and the studs accept it with little more than a grunt or two. They have barbed wire fences and some of them are not that great. Somehow, the studs being in with other stallions or geldings, drops their Testosterone levels to nearly nothing nearly overnight. Personally, I have known of many stallion being kicked and hurt, but it has always been by a mare and not another stud. This is just like young studs being run together or with geldings. They are 10X easier to handle, manner and train than young stallions that are stalled or penned by themselves.
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    05-26-2013, 01:05 PM
  #20
Yearling
If you do a simple google search or talk to any licensed vet you will find that the colt still has residual testosterone for up to 30 days after gelding. I'm not going to argue about this I can't fight ignorance.

To the OP: Gauge him yourself. I've had gelding that were puppy gentle within in a week or two. Others take much longer to change.
Take it one day at a time and see how he does.
     

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