Getting a gelding to act like a gelding.
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Horse Training

Getting a gelding to act like a gelding.

This is a discussion on Getting a gelding to act like a gelding. within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • If a stallion is gelded at the age of 3why does he act like a stallion
  • Gelding acting like a stallion ridden not i hand uk

Like Tree11Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    12-06-2012, 05:03 AM
  #1
Weanling
Getting a gelding to act like a gelding.

My head is seriously about to just spin off quilter...

My gelding, who is TWENTY THREE years old, is driving me completely insane.

So here is a little bit about what is going on, now that I am done freaking out. He is in a stall with a run. He has one horse on each side of him. Before this he was in a run with a shelter with one horse on each side of him and before that he was in a run with a shelter with one horse on the right of him and a larger pasture on the left of him which had other horses in it but not a horse that was next to him 24/7.

So he is extremely herd bound which makes things difficult as it is. But on top of that he acts like a dang stallion! I do not have any clue why this. He was gelded at the age of 18 months, never was a stud, never bred a mare, nothing. He will literally scream, strike, pace, the whole nine yards when around other horses. He is the bottom of the totem pole in a group of horses but I guess the fencing between them makes him feel like a BA *eyeroll*

He has gotten himself tangled in hotwire, torn down the fencing three times and screams his head off almost non stop. It is annoying as all get out. He paces if you move the horses around but then will settle in again after a bit. We have tried putting him between two geldings, with one mare and and one gelding...It doesn't seem to make too much difference. He was the best behaved when he was next to a specific mare which is my friends mare, but moving him back to her would be hard as I want to keep him out of the mud as much as I can and the outside runs, where she is, is all mud.

He moves around so much in his run that he packs down the footing to a point where it gets flooded again. We just put in 3/4 crushed gravel and sand. The front half is gravel, back half is sand. He has compacted the sand to a point that it just gathers water now. The other runs are not having this problem as the horses aren't as active.

What can I do with him?! Can I put him on a daily calming supplement? Gah, I am at my wits end.
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    12-06-2012, 05:06 AM
  #2
Green Broke
What do you feed him and how much do you work him?
     
    12-06-2012, 05:09 AM
  #3
Green Broke
Sorry... I mean do you do anything with him besides turn him in & out? I think he may just need something to stimulate his mind. Like, take him in an arena and give him a task. Say like lunge/circling game at a walk and have him halt at a post, or have him walk and halt in front of something till he gets curious about the object and puts nis nose on it
     
    12-06-2012, 05:12 AM
  #4
Weanling
Right now he isn't being worked all that much due to bad weather. But in the past I have never had this issue with him. This is the worst he has ever been. He used to go months without working and be perfectly fine and that was when he was even younger than he is now.

I am going to start riding him more as I am gaining access to an indoor arena and I hope that it helps, but he is just being difficult. He is a sweetheart and doesn't do any of this behavior when I am at the barn. I know he is herd bound but there isn't really a way to avoid him being around other horses and getting attached to them at a boarding facility.

Also he is on beet pulp, senior grain, alfalfa and grass hay.

Sometimes I just wish he would act his age *sob story*

I am more curious as to why a gelding, who has never been a stallion, would act so insanely like a stallion...any ideas?
     
    12-06-2012, 05:14 AM
  #5
Started
My gelding is very similar, incredibly studdy, territorial and very dominant when not being kept in a herd. If he doesn't have some other horse constantly pushing him around he assume's he's king of the hill. Putting him in with a more dominant horse has helped get rid of some of the general jerky attitude (but he is still interested in the mares). Would it be at all possible to put him in with a bossy mare or three, even if it's not your friend's mare?

Failing that, there are medical treatments available in some countries for geldings that don't like to admit they're missing a few key parts - I know RigCalm is available in the UK but not here in Australia, and I'm not sure about its availability in the US. My old vet (very good one) informed me that a prescribed dose of the same stuff you give to "overenthusiastic" male dogs (the sort that fall in lust with your leg ) proportional to the horse's weight is the same thing and does the same job.
Nokotaheaven likes this.
     
    12-06-2012, 05:16 AM
  #6
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by NordicJuniper    
Right now he isn't being worked all that much due to bad weather. But in the past I have never had this issue with him. This is the worst he has ever been. He used to go months without working and be perfectly fine and that was when he was even younger than he is now.

I am going to start riding him more as I am gaining access to an indoor arena and I hope that it helps, but he is just being difficult. He is a sweetheart and doesn't do any of this behavior when I am at the barn. I know he is herd bound but there isn't really a way to avoid him being around other horses and getting attached to them at a boarding facility.

Also he is on beet pulp, senior grain, alfalfa and grass hay.

Sometimes I just wish he would act his age *sob story*

I am more curious as to why a gelding, who has never been a stallion, would act so insanely like a stallion...any ideas?
Well... It could be he is getting too much in his feed, like electrolytes, for the amount of work that he does. That is what I suspect. It can also be a learned behaviour, as I have known of a couple horses like that. It really is hard to say since I can't see him in action. The only other thing I can think of is he wants a companion. Why is he separated?
EvilHorseOfDoom likes this.
     
    12-06-2012, 05:21 AM
  #7
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nokotaheaven    
Well... It could be he is getting too much in his feed, like electrolytes, for the amount of work that he does. That is what I suspect.
Or cholesterol - which is the primary source of testosterone. While he may not have testes the adrenal gland also produces testosterone (in much lower levels but still...).

OP, what would you say his body score is? What's in the senior grain?
Nokotaheaven and LisaG like this.
     
    12-06-2012, 05:24 AM
  #8
Weanling
EHoD - Good to know that someone else has experienced a gelding like this. It is very difficult to deal with at times. I always say that if I wanted a horse that acted like a stallion, I would have gotten a stallion. That being said, my friend's 1 1/2 year old Friesian stallion is more well behaved that my 23 year old Thoroughbred gelding *headdesk*

What do you think about seeing about putting him in with my friend's mare? Do you think that would help at all? I think it might help with his stud behavior cause she could push him around, but I am worried that it might make him freak out more when she was removed from him to go ride or whatnot...hmm.

Body score wise, I would put him between a 4 and a 5 out of 10. We struggle with his weight but right now he is maintaining it quite well. I can include a picture if you would like.

His senior grain is this one: Senior Horse Feed | Triple Crown Senior Horse Feed Formula Helps Keep Older Horses Healthier

Nokota - It could be, I guess I will find that out once I start riding him more. I really do hope that it turns out to be that simple :P

He isn't exactly separated. He is at a boarding facility that has stalls or shelters with attached runs. They aren't set up for group turnout, not enough acreage for it. There is one large shelter/run that can fit two horses for people that own two and want them together, but that is it.
Nokotaheaven likes this.
     
    12-06-2012, 05:40 AM
  #9
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by NordicJuniper    
EHoD - Good to know that someone else has experienced a gelding like this. It is very difficult to deal with at times. I always say that if I wanted a horse that acted like a stallion, I would have gotten a stallion. That being said, my friend's 1 1/2 year old Friesian stallion is more well behaved that my 23 year old Thoroughbred gelding *headdesk*

What do you think about seeing about putting him in with my friend's mare? Do you think that would help at all? I think it might help with his stud behavior cause she could push him around, but I am worried that it might make him freak out more when she was removed from him to go ride or whatnot...hmm.

Body score wise, I would put him between a 4 and a 5 out of 10. We struggle with his weight but right now he is maintaining it quite well. I can include a picture if you would like.

His senior grain is this one: Senior Horse Feed | Triple Crown Senior Horse Feed Formula Helps Keep Older Horses Healthier

Nokota - It could be, I guess I will find that out once I start riding him more. I really do hope that it turns out to be that simple :P

He isn't exactly separated. He is at a boarding facility that has stalls or shelters with attached runs. They aren't set up for group turnout, not enough acreage for it. There is one large shelter/run that can fit two horses for people that own two and want them together, but that is it.
I've read estimates that around 10-20% of geldings don't lose their male behaviour with their male bits, so it's not rare for geldings to behave like this.

He's going to have to deal with being left by himself - if he's less stressed in general being paddocked with your friend's mare, I'd be going that way. He'll call out for a while but eventually will get used to it.

I would be doing a heap of groundwork with him whenever I couldn't ride if I were you - lots of stuff that gets him respecting space and thinking/learning, so he doesn't get bored. There are some good threads on this forum with groundwork suggestions.
     
    12-06-2012, 05:49 AM
  #10
Weanling
Will doing groundwork help him behave better in general?

He is amazing in hand. Doesn't cause any problems. He can be right next to a mare and if I see him even look at her all I have to do is say his name and he will look back to me. He respects space, doesn't try to run you over or pull you or anything. If he has a halter on or even a rope around his neck then he knows it is time to work and not act like a dingus. Of course he is still hot under saddle, but that is just his personality. On the ground he is great.

Put him in a round pen and you can just stand beside him, with no lead rope. If you walk, he walks. If you jog, he trots. If you stop, he stops. If you turn, he turns...etc. In that matter he is well behaved. He is just irritating with other horses when I am not there. I never actually get to witness the behavior I am telling you all about, I just hear about it from the barn owner.
     

Quick Reply
Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Our new gelding alichawhittaker Horse Talk 10 10-25-2012 04:16 PM
My gelding won't accept new gelding... Peanut97 Horse Talk 10 10-01-2012 12:54 PM
Please tell me what you think of my gelding?!? Boomer11 Horse Conformation Critique 7 06-14-2012 12:53 AM
gelding with attitude issue after gelding Bandy Horse Training 9 05-06-2012 05:45 AM
Gelding!! BarneyBabby Horse Health 11 11-19-2008 11:52 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:42 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0