Getting a new horse that hasn't been ridden in a year, need training help(:
   

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Getting a new horse that hasn't been ridden in a year, need training help(:

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  • 4 Post By loosie
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    08-05-2012, 02:02 AM
  #1
Foal
Question Getting a new horse that hasn't been ridden in a year, need training help(:

So I am about to get a horse that hasn't been ridden in a year.
First off, how long do you give your horses to get used to a knew setting?
Secondly, what do you do to get a horse back in shape? I would like any opinions because I am not quite sure which is the best.
He is a 20 year old TB gelding.
Also what are the best techniques for working on ground manners.
Any advice welcomed! Thank you!
     
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    08-05-2012, 02:49 AM
  #2
Trained
Hi,

Firstly, I get the feeling you're hoping for more specific info than I feel I can give. As you sound like you may not be very experienced with training, I'd suggest you find a good trainer/instructor to help you and do some study into training/behavioural techniques.

'Best techniques for working on ground manners' is a broad and loose subject, as it's so subjective. Eg. What 'ground manners' do you want to teach exactly? & IMO it depends on what & why is going on or not as to whether punishment may be desirable, but I generally use a mix of positive(reward) & negative(release of pressure) reinforcement.

It depends on the horse, the environent, what they've come from & whether there are other horses to help settle them in as to how long/if they take to feel comfortable in their new surrounds. 'Back in shape' is also very subjective. In shape for what? - He may already be there. What sort of shape's he in now?
     
    08-05-2012, 09:45 AM
  #3
Started
Loosie gave the best information; especially under the apparent circumstances.

I can tell you, from my own four horses, that I got on every one of them bareback, when they hadn't been ridden in nearly four years, and went right out the driveway and down the road. That was all due to an accident I had and time sure went by in a hurry.

I didn't do anything except put a bridle on, blow in their noses and quietly say "you owe me a nice ride". No round-penning, lunging, nothing. Thankfully, they are all broke to death and stay that way a lot better than even I anticipated.

Point-being, your new horse is 20, it's only been a year so getting its head back into a bridle (mentally and physically) should not be a big deal for someone with some experience. As long as the horse was well-broke to start with.

Hopefully this is a TB that hasn't come off the track recently because that puts a whole different spin on the "just jump on and go" mindset.

Please get someone with experience that is kind to help you with your new purchase.

Good luck
     
    08-05-2012, 11:53 AM
  #4
Foal
Sorry my posting was indeed very vague.
& yep not incredibly experienced with training at all. However my trainer will be out of country for about 4 more months so I wanted some opinions.
He's incredibly pushy on ground. His owners even though incredible people, have let him get away with a lot that I just can't have happening.
He is a little chub monster right now meaning he is over weight. He was ridden about a year ago for a few months but before that he hadn't been ridden in awhile and they didn't disclose how long or how he did while out.

But Walk you are right, he should still be okay as has been through formal training and in use most of his life.
So thank you for the information!
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    08-05-2012, 12:55 PM
  #5
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by tiffntuff    
my trainer will be out of country for about 4 more months so I wanted some opinions.
He's incredibly pushy on ground. His owners even though incredible people, have let him get away with a lot that I just can't have happening.
Posted via Mobile Device
That's a quite a hurdle to overcome without some experience.

Four months is a long time to wait until your trainer comes back.

If you are not a timid person, do you know someone, with experience, willing to help out to get the horse started back into good ground manners?

Once you get him to realize you ARE the alpha-dominant when he's in your presence, you can continue the ground work until your trainer gets back.

It would keep you safe (from possibly getting thrown) and give you plenty of time to bond on the ground
loosie likes this.
     
    08-05-2012, 04:45 PM
  #6
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by walkinthewalk    
That's a quite a hurdle to overcome without some experience.

Four months is a long time to wait until your trainer comes back.

If you are not a timid person, do you know someone, with experience, willing to help out to get the horse started back into good ground manners?

Once you get him to realize you ARE the alpha-dominant when he's in your presence, you can continue the ground work until your trainer gets back.

It would keep you safe (from possibly getting thrown) and give you plenty of time to bond on the ground
It really is a long time. I've just been using her as long as I can remember and I guess I'm worried about the change. But I have a few people I can get to help more then likely. Haha. Just a pain to get them here.
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    08-05-2012, 09:23 PM
  #7
Started
Well, I do suggest getting someone to help you out - but while you wait you can practice some of these things:

1: Respecting personal space (this seems to be an issue of his?) Practice yielding all of his ends on the ground. You can train him to yield (move away from you) his hind end, front end, back up, steering practice, turning the horse's head with halter or bit pressure - toward and away from you. To teach him these skills - rub him in whichever location, then apply gentle pressure with your finger tips (if he doesn't move gently apply more and more pressure) the Moment he even leans away from the pressure, let go and rub again, each time ask for a little more yielding. For his hind end apply pressure on the squishy fat part of his hind leg, he should move away by turning his hind feet around his front feet, preferably without moving his front feet (except to realign himself). For yielding the front end, the soft squishy part on a horse's shoulder (if he backs up you're too far forward, if he goes forward you're too far back). For backing you can do it by halter or chest pressure, I suggest taking one solid eye-contact step in his direction, say the word 'back' and then apply pressure, eventually he'll back whenever you step into him forcefully.
All those yielding skills are fantastic skills for him to know for riding, it also makes good skills to use when he steps out of line, when he gets too pushy/rude back him up forcefully, get him out of your face.

2: The other big thing I'd suggest, long-line him. If you don't know how - learn. It's an invaluable skill. Practicing ground-driving (long-lining) you can see any quirks that may come up while riding - and it's easier to fix from the ground. I find it better than longing because he's not mindlessly running in circles, he's thinking and maneuvering through obstacles (working with you to do things, not just running away), you can even take him out on the trails when you're confident long-lining. It also helps warm him up and get him back into work. Though if he's well behaved and works well on long-lines might as well hop on

Good luck with your new pony :)
loosie and Coloureds4Mimi like this.
     
    08-06-2012, 01:35 AM
  #8
Foal
Thank you! This is exactly what I was looking for! (: how did you learn to long line? I would love to learn everything but have no idea where or how to learn. Naturally the trainers don't want to give up there secrets or information.
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    08-06-2012, 01:45 AM
  #9
Started
Oh trainers will definitely teach you to long-line! Even a good riding instructor could teach you - or any knowledgeable horse person. See if there are any local driving companies, wedding carriage drivers too could help teach you. It's essentially driving a horse without a carriage.

What I do is have the bridle/halter on the horse with the long lines attached, I have a surcingle (the strap that sits where the saddle would go and girth) and run the lines through that. If you don't have a surcingle (Jeffer's has cheap ones!) but you could also just use your saddle and run your reins through the loops. Then I stand behind and slightly to the inside (assuming your in a ring), far enough back so you couldn't get kicked if your horse is prone to that. Personally with my horses I just slap the reins on their bums to make them walk on or trot, but this is a bad habit I shouldn't do -comes from too many years of lazy carriage driving xD- (when you slap the reins it jiggles on their mouth) so technically you should use a driving whip to get them to move forward.
Then you steer just like as if you were riding and use the whip for speed control, it really should just require little flicks or taps.
If your horse doesn't know how start by attaching all the tack like as if you were ground driving them, but stand in the middle and have him/her circle you like as if you were lunging then slowly work yourself behind them, by turning them away from you. Horses typically pick this skill up faster than people. :P

But you could easily find someone who'd be happy to show you - even check out your local rescues! See if you can volunteer and learn from them :)
     
    08-06-2012, 09:55 PM
  #10
Foal
Have you googled training videos? I got my first horse at the age of 63 and bought Alexandra Kurland clicker training videos. I suspect you're looking for something more advanced but I can't believe there isn't a video out there that will help you. I can honestly say being able to "see" what to do and then go out to paddock and Do it was a blessing (and saved money on basic ground manners and building trust). I wish you the best of luck no matter what method you choose.
     

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