getting way to excited in a canter?
 
 

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getting way to excited in a canter?

This is a discussion on getting way to excited in a canter? within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Seated canter while horse speeds up
  • How to canter an excited horse

 
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    03-26-2008, 11:20 PM
  #1
Banned
getting way to excited in a canter?

Lately I've noticed that each time I ask Sonny for a canter, he'll practically go into a gallop (he's actually gone into a gallop 4 times on me so far) and then after maybe 10 steps (sometimes more) he'll go back down into a canter and be fine. It's just when I first ask him to canter for the day...if I ask him again, he'll canter fine.

Strange thing is, is that if my friend or someone else gets on him and asks for a canter, he behaves. He doesn't try to speed up unless they tell him to.

It's really starting to get annoying. I want to be able to canter him, but with his speeding up close to a gallop when I first ask, I don't want to canter with another horse in the arena, due to I'm afraid that he'll get too carried away and not listen to my cues if I tell him to turn and go around a horse. Thankfully he still listens to me cues (minus half halts, or trying to slow him down in anyway).

I do lunge him before hand, and have him canter around. So it doesn't seem he has an over ammount of energy.

Any ideas?

It isn't due to an poorly fitted saddle, for when another person rides him, they use the same exact saddle. Everything fits fine.
     
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    03-26-2008, 11:30 PM
  #2
Green Broke
Circles!!! Hehe, that's what we do.... if he speeds up on his own, circle him for a while (but he's still cantering) and then let him go and the next time he speeds up circles again........ probably try this first when there aren't a whole lot of people in the arena
     
    03-26-2008, 11:45 PM
  #3
Showing
I'm with MLK...

First off, start on a 20-m circle then ask him up into a canter, and if he gallops right off the bat, circle him smaller (10-m) then when he calms down you can go to the larger circle.
Are you sitting deep, and not asking him to go fast, I.e. Digging in with your calves or heels, or sitting really deep and driving with your seat?
     
    03-26-2008, 11:51 PM
  #4
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by JustDressageIt
I'm with MLK...

First off, start on a 20-m circle then ask him up into a canter, and if he gallops right off the bat, circle him smaller (10-m) then when he calms down you can go to the larger circle.
Are you sitting deep, and not asking him to go fast, I.e. Digging in with your calves or heels, or sitting really deep and driving with your seat?
I am sitting deep, and defiantely not asking him to go fast.
I'll try circles, hopefully that will help
     
    03-27-2008, 01:36 AM
  #5
Weanling
He's probaly doing this because you let him get away with it once or twice, and now he knows. He might be testing you - that's just an option (of so many) of what could be happening.
Start on a 20 meter. Get a nice trot, give a half-halt, "pick up the bit" (I don't know if your aware of that technique). If he gallops, sit deep and circle smaller (as JDI said). Use your voice, and sponge the rein. Remember that one rein is stronger then two. Also, keep him focused by getting an inside bend.
     
    03-27-2008, 12:55 PM
  #6
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cheval
He's probaly doing this because you let him get away with it once or twice, and now he knows. He might be testing you - that's just an option (of so many) of what could be happening.
Start on a 20 meter. Get a nice trot, give a half-halt, "pick up the bit" (I don't know if your aware of that technique). If he gallops, sit deep and circle smaller (as JDI said). Use your voice, and sponge the rein. Remember that one rein is stronger then two. Also, keep him focused by getting an inside bend.
I don't let him get away with it...I'll try to stop him, I'll do half-halts, I'll make him turn abruptly, sitting abnormally deep in the seat, pulling back on the reins...everything I can think of to try and either slow him down or stop him.

I've heard the term "pick up the bit" but I'm still unsure of what that means. I keep him collected as much as I can when we are trotting or cantering.
I will use one rein if he doesn't respond...what we were taught to do is that if the horse bolts or whatever and doesn't respond after you've tried the regular methods of trying to stop, is to put both reins in one hand, reach down close to the bit (but not too close) and pull that one hand back so the head is "ripped" (as my instructor called it) to one side. It seems to slow Sonny down a little bit, but not much. Usually it will slow him down into a extended canter or whatever it's called (slower than a gallop, but not as slow as his regular canter), and then he does forward with his head side ways.

I, myself, can handle him doing that, I've galloped before with horses (once before I got him) so even though I get freaked out at first, I can ride through it and be able to stay on (usually haha)...but I let some of my riding friends ride Sonny also, and I don't want him to do that on them.

It could be he's testing me, but he only does is occasionally...not each time. I'd say he does it ever other, other time.
     
    03-27-2008, 01:04 PM
  #7
Showing
Quote:
sitting abnormally deep in the seat
Just keep in mind that you (should) use your seat to drive a horse forwards.. if you're sitting deep and driving by accident, that could be the root of the problem. If you're sitting deep, make sure you're sitting neutral with your pelvis... rocking it forwards will drive a horse forwards, rocking it back should inhibit forward motion.
Circles will help - start out on one like Cheval and I have said... let us know how it does.
     
    03-27-2008, 01:06 PM
  #8
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by JustDressageIt
Quote:
sitting abnormally deep in the seat
Just keep in mind that you (should) use your seat to drive a horse forwards.. if you're sitting deep and driving by accident, that could be the root of the problem. If you're sitting deep, make sure you're sitting neutral with your pelvis... rocking it forwards will drive a horse forwards, rocking it back should inhibit forward motion.
Circles will help - start out on one like Cheval and I have said... let us know how it does.
I know that rocking will make him go forward and I don't do that even once I get a good canter doing due to his canter is really fast as it is.

I will try some circles. Today as long as Sonny isn't too tired after we warm up
     
    03-27-2008, 05:05 PM
  #9
Green Broke
It sounds like he's testing you, because if he doesnt do it to anyone else and he does it to you he mite be testing you.
     
    03-27-2008, 07:28 PM
  #10
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gingerrrrr
it sounds like he's testing you, because if he doesnt do it to anyone else and he does it to you he mite be testing you.
I've actually think I got an idea as to why he would be like that during the canter, yet sometimes he wouldn't.

The last 3-4 times he's done that (and the only times he's done that) there's been a mare in the arena with us. I don't know if the mares were in heat or what. But I thought that maybe that might play a part of it

I didn't canter him today, due to by the time we had the arena to ourselves, he was really sweaty
     

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