Getting Worse For Farrier - Page 3 - The Horse Forum

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post #21 of 45 Old 06-22-2014, 06:24 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaydee View Post
I'm afraid you'll have to be patient with those of us that ask more and more questions to try to get the bigger picture!!!
I doubt its the farrier if he was the same with the other one
I agree with Foxhunter on the face rubbing - I know this was just you messing with him but if that had been a farrier trying to get a nail in a precise spot with all that swaying about you could have ended up with a lame horse so if you want to set a level for him then maybe find a place to tie him where he wont be tempted to scratch himself - or maybe try a fly mask on him when he's having anything done
I know how tough it is trying to deal with flies - and as someone who moved from the UK to the US I can vouch for the fact that the bugs here are way worse and way more of them. It never ceases to amaze me!!
I think you handled his feet pretty well - its a shame you couldn't hang on to that hind to start with but you didn't really have his full attention but I think you did the right thing by not putting it down when he stopped fighting he needed to do as he was asked, you insisted and he gave in. That is one time I wouldn't have rewarded by allowing him to put the foot down - saying 'good boy' was reward enough so I think you did the right thing there.
I don't mind at all answering a million questions if it will help to get me to the point I need with my questions. Thank you very much for the feedback.

See, I didn't necessarily feel I gave in there. I didn't let go immediately, I held on until he stopped fighting, then I let go to check to see if I could find the fly because I thought he was trying to kick at that and I thought if I could get it away, he'd stop trying to pull to get it. But that is why I posted a video, so others could correct what I view as doing something right. If I don't have someone to tell me otherwise, I would keep making the assumption I am doing it correctly.
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post #22 of 45 Old 06-22-2014, 06:29 PM Thread Starter
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Since it's been mentioned a couple times, let's address the itching. He did this at the farrier's too, only MUCH worse. I was just looking into this actually and that was one of the things I was going to discuss with the vet. I came across this article, and it really seems to apply to what he's been doing, even down to the itchy face of today.The Disturbing Truth About Neck Threadworms and Your Itchy Horse - The Horse's Back I actually thought I was going to talk to the vet about allergies, and I was trying to google what to give him to help ease the itching (like benadryl) when this article stood out. This really sounds like him because at the farrier, he just scratched and scratched his mane, shoulders, chest and face and twice now he has broken out into hives-as the article mentions a possibility of a reaction to fly biets.
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post #23 of 45 Old 06-22-2014, 07:07 PM
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This is a common situation where the owner handles the horse in a way they need to as they might clean the feet but not actually to put shoes on a horse or trim them.

Consider flexing the leg like this......


And like this because this is required to place the hoof on a stand.

Also....


"The greatest strength is gentleness."
- Iroquois Proverb
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post #24 of 45 Old 06-22-2014, 07:17 PM
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In some cases an owner will spend a great deal of time on the hoof area but not think about the things that are connected to the hoof.

Spend as much time with the rest of the leg like this.....




"The greatest strength is gentleness."
- Iroquois Proverb
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post #25 of 45 Old 06-22-2014, 09:08 PM
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He was rather excessive with the scratching - worth looking into as that will make him feel fidgety and uncomfortable. Talk to your vet about it as he might suggest a skin scrape - could be mites, ringworm - all sorts of things
I don't believe in making excuses for a horses naughtiness - but I do believe in looking for reasons why they might be acting up
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post #26 of 45 Old 06-22-2014, 09:34 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaydee View Post
He was rather excessive with the scratching - worth looking into as that will make him feel fidgety and uncomfortable. Talk to your vet about it as he might suggest a skin scrape - could be mites, ringworm - all sorts of things
I don't believe in making excuses for a horses naughtiness - but I do believe in looking for reasons why they might be acting up
I'm going to have to, respectfully, disagree with y'all on this one. Sorry. I guess it's just the "new horse owner" in me, but I can't call a horse scratching his very itchy skin a naughty behavior. I don't liken horses to humans much, but I will on this matter. I can't feel right about correcting him for scratching himself when I am sitting here looking at a scar on my arm from a recent run in with poison ivy/oak/sumac, I don't know what got me, but anyway, point being when I didn't have anything to take the itch away, I was SCRATCHING. Same for the horse. I want to treat the problem, not make him feel like he is doing something wrong for doing what is normal when I can (and should) do something to help him. I'm sure there are those reading this that think I am one of "those" horse owners who have spoiled horses that get away with everything, but I can assure you that is far from the truth. I do not let my horses get away with anything, but I just can't convince myself scratching, in this case, is a behavior issue. Now, rubbing the bridle off while he's supposed to be standing tied at a tree is another story, and I most certainly never let a horse rub on me, no matter HOW itchy! But itchy from sweat and itchy from a skin condition are just two separate things in my eyes. And actually that rubbing the bridle against the tree thing is why I have taught my horses to ground tie. ;)
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post #27 of 45 Old 06-23-2014, 12:26 AM
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From watching the video I don't think your doing anything all that wrong, you just need to stretch out to longer times. The one thing I did see that you might want to think about changing is actually placing his hoof back on the ground rather than just letting go when you're done. You're horse did look like he was putting his own foot down softly but as he gets more relaxed about having his feet handled there may come a time when he'll just let the foot fall. I've seen horses get soured on picking up their feet when they constantly get dropped and it results in the hoof hitting the ground pretty hard. I also think it helps in teaching them that when you are done with the hoof YOU will be the one that places it back on the ground for them.

One other thing that I noticed was your gelding was dropped (different body part LOL) when you started the video and it reminded me of a problem a gelding of mine will have while being shod. Don't know if nerves causes it or what but it always seems about halfway through getting shod he starts getting antsy and it's because he has to pee. I'll lead him out onto the grass and give him a minute and sure enough he'll go and then we go right back into the farrier and he's perfectly content to stand still again.
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post #28 of 45 Old 06-23-2014, 01:37 AM
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Get some 100% pure Neem Oil. Mix 2 tablespoons Neem with the same of liquid soap. Add a gallon of warm water and sponge him all over with the mix. This will keep the flies away and alleviate any irritation.
Don't try to spray it on as the neem can block the nozzle. It will work for several days.
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post #29 of 45 Old 06-23-2014, 06:54 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Foxhunter View Post
Get some 100% pure Neem Oil. Mix 2 tablespoons Neem with the same of liquid soap. Add a gallon of warm water and sponge him all over with the mix. This will keep the flies away and alleviate any irritation.
Don't try to spray it on as the neem can block the nozzle. It will work for several days.
This?
Amazon.com : Neem Pro 100% 8oz : Home Pest Repellents : Patio, Lawn & Garden
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post #30 of 45 Old 06-23-2014, 09:50 AM
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I couldn't get into that site but it sounds right.

I use a lot on the garden and but it in 5 litre size.
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