Getting your horses "exposed" to everything, how do you do it?
 
 

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Getting your horses "exposed" to everything, how do you do it?

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    08-06-2013, 03:46 PM
  #1
Yearling
Getting your horses "exposed" to everything, how do you do it?

Hey everyone!
I have plans on showing my 2yo colt in the future. I wanted to ask how everyone exposes their horses to the hustle and bustle of the show grounds, and if it required anything to do so.
So far my colt is fearless when it comes to loading and unloading in a trailer, takes a saddle and bridle like a champ, will lead and follow you anywhere, and ties like a pro (only after having an issue with a telephone pole! ) He takes on new and scary objects everytime we go for our evening walks, likes to be around cattle, isn't afraid of dogs (will actually chase them, and chickens too).
There is a local show coming up soon, and I was thinking about just taking him there to let him watch and see what all goes on, but i'm nervous on hauling him. Any ideas?
Your thoughts and ideas are appreciated!!
P.S. He even walked up to people in a swimming pool, and a noisy pool pump.
Storm.jpg
     
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    08-06-2013, 03:55 PM
  #2
Showing
I tend to treat my youngster as if she already knows everything, and I try to not act differently around her. I expect her to stand nicely even if there's stuff going on around her, and correct or redirect attention if she starts to act up.
My plan for starting her show career is to start with taking her to other barns to school, and attend a few shows either not participating or just doing a couple small classes and build up.
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ponypile, smrobs, boots and 4 others like this.
     
    08-06-2013, 04:35 PM
  #3
Trained
I just hop on and go show!
Don't overface the horse, of course, do what they are easily able to do in order to build confidence, but they're not going to get good at it if you don't do it lots!
My FEI horse has always been at home in the show ring. At his first show he won championships and had some of the highest scores there. The kiddo I'm training is spooky in the show ring. So guess who gets dragged to every horse show in the area?
I agree with JDI - don't handle the horse with kid gloves. Horses will rise up to our expectations if they are reasonable. As soon as the horse can stop, go and turn I like to start hacking them and going places - to give them a broad view of the world.

Good luck!
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    08-06-2013, 04:42 PM
  #4
Showing
Agreed, the only way for a horse to gain exposure is to be exposed LOL. I'll take my horses out for rides around town or down along the highway (probably before I really should, but...).

So long as you've got the knowledge and ability to get her mind re-centered if she gets boogered, you should be good to go.
     
    08-06-2013, 04:54 PM
  #5
Showing
A strong bond or leadership means she will look to you. Stay with your horse all the time. You don't have to be grooming or fussing, just be there. You're all that's familiar at a show. He's like a toddler at a circus - it's ok as long as mommy is there.
     
    08-06-2013, 05:57 PM
  #6
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by smrobs    
Agreed, the only way for a horse to gain exposure is to be exposed LOL. I'll take my horses out for rides around town or down along the highway (probably before I really should, but...).

So long as you've got the knowledge and ability to get her mind re-centered if she gets boogered, you should be good to go.
Bwahahahaha I have many a story of a young Ro deciding he was a wild stallion and had to protect his herd (ie me) from whatever semi truck. Inevitable we were always alone as no self respecting dressage queen would ride down the highway with me...
Oh gosh I was thankful for my "Whoa!"

Young horses are a blast (literally) :P
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    08-06-2013, 08:03 PM
  #7
Yearling
Thanks everyone, I don't ride him currently he's only 2. He's not afraid of vehicles or anything, heck he walks up to the tractor and follows it everywhere!
The last time I showed a horse I was 12 years old, and the gelding I was on was an old pro, I was more nervous than he was!! I'v never trained up my own foal before Storm is my first, so a lot of this is new to me. I'll give everything a shot!! Wish me luck LOL!!
     
    08-06-2013, 08:05 PM
  #8
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by smrobs    
Agreed, the only way for a horse to gain exposure is to be exposed LOL. I'll take my horses out for rides around town or down along the highway (probably before I really should, but...).

So long as you've got the knowledge and ability to get her mind re-centered if she gets boogered, you should be good to go.
The closes town is 7 miles from me!! I walk a good bit on the dirt road, and up to the main road. Which is a mile or so hike.
     
    08-06-2013, 11:43 PM
  #9
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elizabeth Bowers    
Hey everyone!
I have plans on showing my 2yo colt in the future. I wanted to ask how everyone exposes their horses to the hustle and bustle of the show grounds, and if it required anything to do so.
So far my colt is fearless when it comes to loading and unloading in a trailer, takes a saddle and bridle like a champ, will lead and follow you anywhere, and ties like a pro (only after having an issue with a telephone pole! ) He takes on new and scary objects everytime we go for our evening walks, likes to be around cattle, isn't afraid of dogs (will actually chase them, and chickens too).
There is a local show coming up soon, and I was thinking about just taking him there to let him watch and see what all goes on, but i'm nervous on hauling him. Any ideas?
Your thoughts and ideas are appreciated!!
P.S. He even walked up to people in a swimming pool, and a noisy pool pump.
Attachment 248481
Take him everywhere and show him the world. Allow him to be curious and smell and look at things that scare him and allow him to learn how to cope with things. My rule with my horses is that they spend 24 hours in a field hanging out, so when I come all I ask is good ground manners and no goofiness.
My foals see everything. They will be worked in stalls, in barn aisle, in the wash rack. They will be expected to stand still in arenas, trailers, during lessons around other horses being ridden. I will back them myself, I will groom them, spray them, clip them. By the time my horses are ready to be ridden and broke, there really wont be anything new to them that they have not seen or done that isnt second nature.

It cuts a lot of BS out of their life, they are a lot happier because they have already seen it and they are always very quiet. I've had vets come to me asking me how I manage to pull off having such a quiet baby. I've had farriers tell me my foals have ben the quietest most respectful youngster they have had to work with.

It's all about working with them for the appropriate amount of time and really understanding how they perceive and read what you ask them. I think it's something you learn with experience and training.
     
    08-07-2013, 02:41 PM
  #10
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by My2Geldings    
Take him everywhere and show him the world. Allow him to be curious and smell and look at things that scare him and allow him to learn how to cope with things. My rule with my horses is that they spend 24 hours in a field hanging out, so when I come all I ask is good ground manners and no goofiness.
My foals see everything. They will be worked in stalls, in barn aisle, in the wash rack. They will be expected to stand still in arenas, trailers, during lessons around other horses being ridden. I will back them myself, I will groom them, spray them, clip them. By the time my horses are ready to be ridden and broke, there really wont be anything new to them that they have not seen or done that isnt second nature.

It cuts a lot of BS out of their life, they are a lot happier because they have already seen it and they are always very quiet. I've had vets come to me asking me how I manage to pull off having such a quiet baby. I've had farriers tell me my foals have ben the quietest most respectful youngster they have had to work with.

It's all about working with them for the appropriate amount of time and really understanding how they perceive and read what you ask them. I think it's something you learn with experience and training.
I've had him since he was 6 months old, and sick with strangles. He was difficult to halter train, but once done, he's been great ever since. He takes everything in stride, I allow him plenty of time to look at and investigate things. I was so proud of him when I was teaching him to load into a trailer. I take him everywhere, he's not afraid of cars or any farm equipment, he usually stands and observes it. I'v done as much as I can with him since i'v had him, except for haul him places. Heck I finally got him to ground tie! I think he'll do good, but horses are horses and one must expect the unexpected too. Thanks for the advice, the horse in your avatar pic is beautiful!!!
     

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