Getting your new horse to respect you.
 
 

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Getting your new horse to respect you.

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  • 1 Post By Cowgirls Boots

 
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    11-16-2012, 09:50 AM
  #1
Green Broke
Getting your new horse to respect you.

So I have recently aquired a new horse. He is a 13 year old paint gelding who originally came from Virginia and was a cow/ranch horse. Am not totally sure how well he did on cows though. He's low low man on the totem pole, my mini bosses him around. He's bombproof and anyone can ride.

Anyways, he's a tad pushy. He'll nudge his head on you and knock you over and he doesn't stand still. He'll stand on cross toes but after a certain amount of time he gets fidgety.

So my actual question is how do I do 'join up' with him? I know pushyness is due to ground manners which we have been working on. But he does test me alot. If he doesn't want to do something he just stops. He didnt want to load on the trailer to bring him home and he just stopped right infront of it. (Wasnt the least bit scared once he was on or on the ride home though). He also didnt want to go into the barn or ring so just stopped. I usually just click to him and he starts moving again.

Also, once he sees the halter in your hand to come and catch him he walks away. I usually have to sneak up to him and put a rope around his neck first and then he stands.

Where I got him from he was leased by a guy but I'm not sure how well he knew how to ride or anything. And there's also alot of younger kids at that barn so they could hve let him get away with murder.

Input is awesome. :)
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    11-16-2012, 10:03 AM
  #2
Banned
Hmmm I'm not into all that join up stuff.....but it's good you recognize some of the behaviours of testing you.....easy answer, GET AFTER HIM! When he moves away from you when you go to catch him, GET AFTER HIM, 'so, ok, you want to move away, sure, you can move' and make him move away, RUN! Eventually he will figure out that it's easier to be caught than it is to run around the yard for however long it takes for him to 'join up' as some like to call it. As for everything else....GET AFTER HIM!
     
    11-16-2012, 10:10 AM
  #3
Green Broke
Haha, I figured that's the answer most would say as that's what I've been doing :). My paddock is about 3 acres so chasing him usually isn't too fun but normally I approach him slow and hide the halter. I've only had him 3 days so he is also in a new environment but I saw him do these things before I bought him too. He didnt want to be caught when we showed up to bring him home. -_-

As to the stopping thing whenever he doesn't want to do something should I just ignore it and make him walk on? I usually give a firm 'Ehh!!' And click and make him walk. Such a brat ;)
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    11-16-2012, 10:26 AM
  #4
Started
I think your on the right track. I would carry a halter with you whenever you go out to the pasture. Just take the halter out, love on all the other horses. After a few minutes, go to approach him. If he walks away, don't give up, keep at it until you catch him, give him a pet (and maybe a treat, if your into giving treats by hand), then walk away and leave them. It doesnt take long before they figure out the halter is a good thing.

Sneaking up on a horse with a halter is never a good thing in my oppinion. You don't build trust. The herd where I'm at, you walk out with a halter in hand and every horse comes running up to you, including 7 that were concidered very hard to catch before coming to the farm.

As for the stoping, don't make a big deal, give him a tug on the lead and expect him to move forwards. If he is really determined you can make him work hard, back wards and side to side, yeilding, side passing, ect. Even the most stubborn soon figure out that its not worth the effort of stopping.
     
    11-16-2012, 10:38 AM
  #5
Green Broke
I will try carrying the halter Everytime I feed, etc..he's a treat hog. I gave him one treat yesterday and he followed me around the pasture for 5 minutes. I know he's just being stubborn and testing me.

Yesterday when I caught him he saw the halter but just kinda turned away and was more occupied on the feed bin I had open. I swung the lead over his neck and he put his face in the halter.
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    11-16-2012, 04:59 PM
  #6
Started
Helps to approach from the shoulder head area. Approach when the horse is facing you. When a turns his face away I stop and turn and look indirectly while pointing my shoulder at their face with my body slightly angled if I'm somewhat close I try asking for a join up. I keep the body position my shoulders are squared but relaxed, I hold my arm outward hand neutral and my arm and hand are slightly pointing downward. If they walk away I go towards them and make them move their feet move I extend my arm outward towards their shoulder or hip and flick my forearm like a horse head toss or like its a whip. Then I follow them the may go of a bit but they naturally turn back to face me. Then basically I try again. It take a lot of practice to get the body language right but one you get it you can establish a "mental halter". Practicing this is great cause one I can always catch my horses even if they don't want me to. To it helps with the mentally of them wanting to be with you. Have a join up type game that I play with my horses they will follow me just about anywhere and I don't have to touch them usually I can move them using my body language. I'll put a link to two videos one is me playing with my pally mare joy. Ignore the head toss I normally do this in a rope halter with a lead rope. I just fitted a new headstall and she has never had a curb chain before so she is a little sensitive to it. I had it very loose but it was still to much. Eventually she will learn to walk backwards when I walk backwards. My gelding does this I wish I had a video with him. And the other video isn't the best but it does show me asking my colts to join up and follow me. It can at least give you a body language reference, they key to join up is to indirectly look at them if you stare at them it can be taken at you intimidating them or being predatory. I wish I had someone to film me but I hope they can help. I'm not a master trainer I'm always learning but I spend time always trying to learn their body language and improving mine for better communication. And don't let him rub you make him back up and off you. Joy does this after we work sometimes she likes being a bit too close. She never steps on me or pushes on me but after she gets sweaty she occasionally try to rub her face on me. I just have to remind her about space. She's getting better she been in retracing for about 2 months now. Anyways I hope the videos help let me know if you need any clarification on my part. It's hard to explain the little details needed to communicate body language. Hope I help some.

Join up with the colts

http://i208.photobucket.com/albums/b...7B5C738A5A.mp4

Playing with joy

http://i208.photobucket.com/albums/b...6BE3A0D856.mp4
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    11-16-2012, 05:22 PM
  #7
Trained
They sold you their problem horse, sorry to say. The problems are fixable, however. You need to be the head broodmare, and expect nothing less than perfect behavior at all times to get his respect. I'll answer one by one.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cowgirls Boots    
...he's a tad pushy. He'll nudge his head on you and knock you over and he doesn't stand still. He'll stand on cross toes but after a certain amount of time he gets fidgety. Posted via Mobile Device
He is VERY PUSHY. Three things to do. First, find a good book. Get a chair and after you've tied him to a tie post, sit down far enough away that he can't touch you should he try to break the lead, and read for 3-4 hours. Repeat this. He needs to understand patience, but you don't need to be in danger while he learns it.
Secondly, you need a whip, preferably a dressage length with a little bat. I bought one at my farm supply store last year for about $12.00
NEVER let him physically bully you with his body. Always keep him far enough away that he cannot kick or strike you. Even my 70 lb dog has slammed into me and almost knocked me over while running with my 60 lb dog. Your horse weighs much more. Any time he tries to move you with his body, smack him on the chest. If he gets even pushier, smack him on the neck, and say, "NO!" Horses can learn English, just like dogs.\
Thirdly, don't cross tie him. Tie him to a post with the lead. Every time you go to the other side to groom him, make him move his hind quarters over. I wave my hands and my 3 horses know "over", and just move on the forehand for me. I've done it since I bought my horses in 1985, so I know it works.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cowgirls Boots    
...he does test me alot. If he doesn't want to do something he just stops. He didnt want to load on the trailer to bring him home and he just stopped right infront of it. He also didnt want to go into the barn or ring so just stopped. I usually just click to him and he starts moving again.
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Lunging and loose lunging in a round pen or small arena. You need him to move his feet while you barely move yours. It's pretty much, "Get out of MY way", just like the head of the herd does, and he understands this. Horses that are reluctant to move are the ones that will freeze when you're riding them and something frightens them, then they explode. I've had horses for over 27 years now and experienced this. Better that my horse shies and moves away, best when they move their feet. Yours plants his. Don't accept it. Consider it, game on, and your job is to control his feet every time he is around you.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cowgirls Boots;1760368Also, once he sees the halter in your hand to come and catch him he walks away. I usually have to sneak up to him and put a rope around his neck first and then he stands.
[SIZE=1
Posted via Mobile Device[/SIZE]
You need to control his food. I suggest that you feed him his grain while he is tied. If he doesn't eat grain, get a bag and just feed 1/2 pound every day to train him. The game is, if you don't let me catch you, you don't get the treat. Bribe, cajole, tease.
Also, you can hold out a carrot too far to reach, say, "come here", and make him walk to you. Do this no more than 2x/day. He'll be more interested in walk to you after this, but it will take a good month to teach him.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cowgirls Boots    
Where I got him from he was leased by a guy but I'm not sure how well he knew how to ride or anything. And there's also alot of younger kids at that barn so they could hve let him get away with murder.
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Problem horse, and bad habits taught by lessers produce this result. No sense crying over spilt milk. I'm sure that if you are diligent and patient you can fix him. =D
     
    11-16-2012, 06:13 PM
  #8
Green Broke
Yeah, he's a typical lesson horse. Got away with murder! Thanks for the helpful posts. Today he did end up getting super ancy on the cross ties and danced and pawed. I do plan on tying him soon and letting him work it out himself but just need to find something to tie him to away from everything. He also did not respect me saying over. He literally braced against me and he didnt end up winning. And he gives me a hard time picking up his back feet.

I have my work cut out for me ;) but on a side note I rode him for the first time at my barn and he was great. Just tends to veer towards the gate but I worked him passed it and when I got off I made him walk to the farthest corner of the arena. Stand facing away from the gate. I got off. Walked to the gate and backed him out of it. Made him stand and then walked off.
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