Gidget kicked me - Page 3
   

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Horse Training

Gidget kicked me

This is a discussion on Gidget kicked me within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

    Like Tree24Likes

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        08-14-2011, 04:09 PM
      #21
    Showing
    Gidget, this works with all horses of all temperments. Take a stout stick at least 4' long and wear comfortable footwear and be prepared to walk her down. Leave your anger, impatience at the gate. Keep the stick pointed to the ground and behind you. It is there, in case. Circle around, oh 30' away until you are directly behind her, in her blind area. If she's grazing, good, then run directly toward her rump with lots of energy and wave your arms out sideways so you look huge. She will likely take off and that's what you want. Again get in behind her and do the same thing. She will start keeping an eye on you but one eye isn't good enough, you want both eyes. What is going on here is you are moving her off her grazing spot like a dominant horse will. So you are letting her know that you are the dominant one, not her. When she will face you with both eyes stand still, lean forward a little so you appear smaller and extend your slightly closed hand. She may come and touch it, or not. If she doesn't, step back a few paces, wait a few seconds then step forward and reach again. Don't try to touch her, she must come the last inch. If she turns and walks away or suddenly bolts away your must immediately turn and walk in the opposite direction. Begin your circling and chasing again. Take the time to do this now and do it 4 or 5 times day if you can. The goal isn't to catch her just yet but that when you enter the field and walk toward her that she will immediately turn her hiney away and face you, no ifs, ands, or buts. I did this while the horse was not wearing a halter. I knew it was working when he stood quietly for haltering. When you first chase the horse, you are just chasing it off the spot it was eating. Don't run past that. That is now your spot, for a few seconds. She may run a good distance at first but if you always stop at her spot she'll get so it's only a few strides. And believe me, she'll be trying to figure out what's going on. Most horses don't like to be the dominant horse as that's the one that rarely gets to relax. It's job is to keep the herd safe. It's much easier to keep an eye on the dominant horse and you will find that as you assert your dominance she will become willing to keep an eye on you, altho you want both eyes. There's an old cowboy adage, Beware the horse that watches you with one eye.
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        08-14-2011, 04:30 PM
      #22
    Super Moderator
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Saddlebag    
    Gidget, this works with all horses of all temperments. Take a stout stick at least 4' long and wear comfortable footwear and be prepared to walk her down. Leave your anger, impatience at the gate. Keep the stick pointed to the ground and behind you. It is there, in case. Circle around, oh 30' away until you are directly behind her, in her blind area. If she's grazing, good, then run directly toward her rump with lots of energy and wave your arms out sideways so you look huge. She will likely take off and that's what you want. Again get in behind her and do the same thing. She will start keeping an eye on you but one eye isn't good enough, you want both eyes. What is going on here is you are moving her off her grazing spot like a dominant horse will. So you are letting her know that you are the dominant one, not her. When she will face you with both eyes stand still, lean forward a little so you appear smaller and extend your slightly closed hand. She may come and touch it, or not. If she doesn't, step back a few paces, wait a few seconds then step forward and reach again. Don't try to touch her, she must come the last inch. If she turns and walks away or suddenly bolts away your must immediately turn and walk in the opposite direction. Begin your circling and chasing again. Take the time to do this now and do it 4 or 5 times day if you can. The goal isn't to catch her just yet but that when you enter the field and walk toward her that she will immediately turn her hiney away and face you, no ifs, ands, or buts. I did this while the horse was not wearing a halter. I knew it was working when he stood quietly for haltering. When you first chase the horse, you are just chasing it off the spot it was eating. Don't run past that. That is now your spot, for a few seconds. She may run a good distance at first but if you always stop at her spot she'll get so it's only a few strides. And believe me, she'll be trying to figure out what's going on. Most horses don't like to be the dominant horse as that's the one that rarely gets to relax. It's job is to keep the herd safe. It's much easier to keep an eye on the dominant horse and you will find that as you assert your dominance she will become willing to keep an eye on you, altho you want both eyes. There's an old cowboy adage, Beware the horse that watches you with one eye.
    I have done this with horses in our 40 acre field, in a herd of 15 animals. Sometimes I get the horse to come to me, sometimes I don't have the time to pursue it to successfully drawing the horse in. Forty acres is a big place. However, I have never heard of the advice I highlighted.
    If the horse turns and bolts from me, I immediately put on larger pressure, just for the split second that they swung their butt toward me, then I resume walking them down.
         
        08-14-2011, 06:48 PM
      #23
    Green Broke
    You have had some very good advice here but I want to tell you a little story.

    My right knee is missing the medial miniscus and has a torn cruciate ligament from a horse kicking. In this case I was fully cognizant of the dangers of kicking and approaching horses. What happened is I was told to go to the herd and separate a gelding out and put him in a different field. He was in a run in area and I was told to take him from there, thru a door into the stable and out the other side to the field he was to be in.

    As I was separating him out, the dominant mare came flying into the run in shed area (it was a huge roofed area with standing stalls where the herd was fed grain). She caught him "alone" and came at him running backward and kicking at him. I was yelling and she was ignoring me.. and I got caught in the cross fire (it happened very quickly). One of her kicks got my knee and dropped me which was a ****ed good thing because her next kick would have exploded my head against a concrete wall. She kicked again and finally landed one on her target (the gelding) who took off thru the door I was intending to lead him thru when all this went down.

    I crawled out the door myself and got is shut and she was on the other side pawing the ground.... still wanting to eat that gelding.

    I have had two knee surgeries and do physical therapy daily to keep the support structure for my knee strong. Now, 26 years later I was just issued an off loading brace. Eventually I will need knee replacement. I am trying to put this off until after I cross the rainbow bridge.. but I may not be successful...

    This was a riding stable where there were kids. The mare was sent down the road.. as they could not risk her doing this again (and there is no doubt in my mind she would have). What made her a danger was the fact that she totally IGNORED my yelling, arm waving and the rest as she was so intent on 'punishing' the gelding for not being in the herd. My presence was simply not important.

    My point is this is the first time Giget has done this to you. She is, as everyone says here, being a horse. Her behavior, for all its 'horse-ness' is unacceptable and you need to be 100% committed to making sure that you never get in firing range again and that she understands she is never to fire at you again. She needs to understand that YOU are important.

    As you have noted.. horses are not like pet dogs. There is no Fury, Flicka, Mr. Ed or The Black Stallion.

    Horses are not as domesticated as we would like to believe.
    dee, Gidget and Golden Horse like this.
         
        08-14-2011, 06:57 PM
      #24
    Trained
    One thing that you can observe in a group of horses. If a horse kicks another horse, they scuffle, decide who is boss, and then they are still friends. All is forgiven. No grudge is held. Therefore, there is no reason to feel bad if you are forced to slap a horse with a crop because she is about to kick you. Horses don't really care who is in charge. They just need to know who is in charge. It needs to be you. Don't blame the horse. Just be careful and correct any aggressive behavior. Everybody gets kicked. Everybody gets thrown. I hope you are ok now. The horse still likes you fine.
         
        08-14-2011, 07:44 PM
      #25
    Trained
    Sorry you were kicked, but as other said, don't take it personally. She was being a horse, that's all. I do wish you had made the moments following that a living hell for her, but what's done is done. Once your knee is feeling better, I would do some ground schooling with her to make sure she understands who is boss. She moves her feet when you say so, not the other way around.

    My horse tried to challenge me once, but even as he attempted to kick out, he did it just far enough away where it barely landed. He knew that was a bad idea as soon as he threw it. He ran off in the other direction, and I chased him around that paddock for the next 20 seconds or so. A minute later we were back hanging out like buddies. It's just what horses do. Test the waters every now and then and accept whatever the outcome is.
         
        08-14-2011, 08:00 PM
      #26
    Yearling
    Is it possible that she is in / coming into season?
    Posted via Mobile Device
         
        08-14-2011, 08:48 PM
      #27
    Started
    Gidget, I'm sure, from your words, that you understand the reason(s) that your horse went to kick at you, & also the reason that the kick made contact ;), so 'nuff said there.

    I also think that, since you did the punishment stuff, it'd be very educational for you to recall the effects of that upon her: after her being round penned & tied up, what was her demeanor toward you? Did she trust you less/perceive you as her leader less, etc? I, for one, am very interested to know.

    Re: bonding: horses don't care how much you know till they know how much you care. "Horses don't care about a bond" isn't true. It's just that along with the love, they need leadership & language, in 3 equal parts.

    Re: halters/leads in a field on a loose horse: a horse often scratches his cheek with a hind hoof, & horses have gotten their hind hooves caught in a halter doing so, with disastrous results.
         
        08-14-2011, 09:04 PM
      #28
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Elana    

    There is no Fury, Flicka, Mr. Ed or The Black Stallion.

    Horses are not as domesticated as we would like to believe.
    This should be posted in every barn, Disney et al have a lot to answer for
         
        08-14-2011, 09:39 PM
      #29
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Elana    
    You have had some very good advice here but I want to tell you a little story.

    My right knee is missing the medial miniscus and has a torn cruciate ligament from a horse kicking. In this case I was fully cognizant of the dangers of kicking and approaching horses. What happened is I was told to go to the herd and separate a gelding out and put him in a different field. He was in a run in area and I was told to take him from there, thru a door into the stable and out the other side to the field he was to be in.

    As I was separating him out, the dominant mare came flying into the run in shed area (it was a huge roofed area with standing stalls where the herd was fed grain). She caught him "alone" and came at him running backward and kicking at him. I was yelling and she was ignoring me.. and I got caught in the cross fire (it happened very quickly). One of her kicks got my knee and dropped me which was a ****ed good thing because her next kick would have exploded my head against a concrete wall. She kicked again and finally landed one on her target (the gelding) who took off thru the door I was intending to lead him thru when all this went down.

    I crawled out the door myself and got is shut and she was on the other side pawing the ground.... still wanting to eat that gelding.

    I have had two knee surgeries and do physical therapy daily to keep the support structure for my knee strong. Now, 26 years later I was just issued an off loading brace. Eventually I will need knee replacement. I am trying to put this off until after I cross the rainbow bridge.. but I may not be successful...

    This was a riding stable where there were kids. The mare was sent down the road.. as they could not risk her doing this again (and there is no doubt in my mind she would have). What made her a danger was the fact that she totally IGNORED my yelling, arm waving and the rest as she was so intent on 'punishing' the gelding for not being in the herd. My presence was simply not important.

    My point is this is the first time Giget has done this to you. She is, as everyone says here, being a horse. Her behavior, for all its 'horse-ness' is unacceptable and you need to be 100% committed to making sure that you never get in firing range again and that she understands she is never to fire at you again. She needs to understand that YOU are important.

    As you have noted.. horses are not like pet dogs. There is no Fury, Flicka, Mr. Ed or The Black Stallion.

    Horses are not as domesticated as we would like to believe.
    Holy cow....I am glad that you are okay. That's HORRIBLE!

    I am able to walk.Just tender. I took the training stick out while I was bathing her. Every time she turned her butt towards me I would whack her and it wasn't a love tap. I wanted her to understand that she will not face her butt towards me ever again. I did some ground work with her. I lunged her on a line and she did well. I also made her constantly face me and turn on her haunches to get her behind facing away from me. If she reared I'd smack her with the stick...If she did anything to threaten/hurt me she was whacked....she behaved well. She later on laid her head against my chest and was relaxing. I was very cautious and making sure there was nothing to fear. I then had her back away. I will continue to work with her and have her behave. She didn't even bother to eat grass as I had her so busy. Once I left she was allowed to eat.

    I managed to have a photoshoot with her. I will have them posted in the picture section.
         
        08-14-2011, 09:41 PM
      #30
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Northern    
    Gidget, I'm sure, from your words, that you understand the reason(s) that your horse went to kick at you, & also the reason that the kick made contact ;), so 'nuff said there.

    I also think that, since you did the punishment stuff, it'd be very educational for you to recall the effects of that upon her: after her being round penned & tied up, what was her demeanor toward you? Did she trust you less/perceive you as her leader less, etc? I, for one, am very interested to know.


    After I lunged Gidget she did behave but when I saddled her up (she is girthy) she looked at me and it looked to me that she wanted to bite so I pushed her head away. I don't think tying her up did anything other than make me feel better.
         

    Thread Tools

    Similar Threads
    Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
    Gidget and I JUMPING! Gidget Horse Riding Critique 7 07-08-2011 12:12 AM
    Gidget is going to training Gidget Horse Training 2 06-12-2011 11:29 PM
    Gidget coliced again Gidget Horse Health 11 05-09-2011 05:16 PM
    Critique GIDGET! Gidget Horse Riding Critique 17 09-10-2010 11:31 PM
    Pictures of Gidget and I. Gidget Horse Pictures 2 09-10-2010 10:40 PM



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:03 AM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0