good luck to the farrier
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Horse Training

good luck to the farrier

This is a discussion on good luck to the farrier within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Horse afraid of farrier picking up back legs
  • Bell bell is he a good horse farrier

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    10-17-2007, 09:35 PM
  #1
Trained
good luck to the farrier

Well, a lot of you would have read about my new warmblood and his bad feet. His back nearside hoof is impossible to pick up without him squealing and kicking. Im assuming because of the lack of attention he received before we got him and as a consequence the awful condition his feet are in, that he has some soreness there.

I have organised for a farrier to come out this saturday but im very worried about how we are going to get him to stand still and not kick while the farrier is doing his thing. He really needs to have them done as the hoof in question is terribly split.

Can anyone lend me some pointers on dealing with my mr cranky pants and keeping everyone safe during the farriers visit :)
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    10-17-2007, 10:34 PM
  #2
Started
Well, it's obvious that this is a fear issue and not a dominance issue. So, I would start out by being able to gently swing a lead rope around his legs in a friendly manner. Get him used to that. Then take a lunge whip and gently rub him all over with it, including his legs. That way if he kicks you are far away. If he kicks at the whip, leave it there until he stops and then quickly retreat when he calms down. Look for signs of relaxation. When he is confident with that, then give him leg massages. That's an excellent way to get a horse to like his legs being messed with. When you ask him to pick up his leg, pinch the chestnut, not the tendon. If it's his back legs, squeeze the cap of the hock. When you finally ask him to pick it up, when he gives it to you hold the very tip of his toe. This is a power position and you have more of a chance holding on this way. If you have to let go, that's ok. Just rub him until he relaxes then start again. You don't want to punish him, he's just scared.

When the farrier does come out, I would be VERY CLEAR that he is to take his time and be VERY PATIENT. If the farrier is not, then the horse's confidence will not improve.
     
    10-17-2007, 10:43 PM
  #3
Foal
I don't know how much help I can be but I have a horse very like yours.

Gus is 14 and had been abused, I had no idea how bad till I brought him home. Anyway his feet were horrid. He would kick if you touched his hind legs and I could barely pick up his front for a split sec. I had the farrier out to meet the new horse and see if we could at least try the front. No way Gus bolted as the man approached, was trembling and scared to death. So long story short it has been almost two months and I have got him to where I can pick out his front feet and run my hand all the way down both hind legs, it took lots of time.
My point is can you work with him more maybe? Sometimes it is just too soon for the horse to deal with another new person. I understand his feet are bad but not to sound neglectful but it is not the end of the world if he had to wait longer. Try going out and just touching his legs, even if it is with a crop or soft rope until he stops kicking at it the put him away. Come back out and repeat. Then work your way to touching his legs with your hands, and leave. Come back and repeat. Then pick up his front and put it down, etc.... It has taken me almost two months with mine, luckily his feet have warn down pretty nicely. I probably could make more progress but I don't work on his feet every day. I plan on getting a rasp and getting him used to that before I have the farrier out again. Also I have heard of farriers tranquilizing horses to do there feet in special situations. You could ask. My suggestion is get him used to at least you handling his feet before you ask the horse to let a stranger do it. Good luck!!!
     
    10-17-2007, 10:53 PM
  #4
Weanling
Lets just hope the farrier is confidant with horses. Dad does our horses, although my friends in QLD tell me horrible stories about under knowledged Farriers. One farrier I got told about was a real scaredy cat around horses! He would shake going up to pat them. Anyway the owner said to him, this horse is only young and hasn't been handled before he even came out. The young un handled horse reared up and striked him the belly.

He didn't get any serious injuries although he sewed this family heaps of money!! :roll: I would becareful of the farriers you chose, and make sure you tell them what he is capable of, so then he has some idea.

Just thought I might drop that idea in.
Cheers,
Sweetypie
     
    10-18-2007, 07:42 AM
  #5
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spirithorse
Well, it's obvious that this is a fear issue and not a dominance issue. So, I would start out by being able to gently swing a lead rope around his legs in a friendly manner. Get him used to that. Then take a lunge whip and gently rub him all over with it, including his legs. That way if he kicks you are far away. If he kicks at the whip, leave it there until he stops and then quickly retreat when he calms down. Look for signs of relaxation. When he is confident with that, then give him leg massages. That's an excellent way to get a horse to like his legs being messed with. When you ask him to pick up his leg, pinch the chestnut, not the tendon. If it's his back legs, squeeze the cap of the hock. When you finally ask him to pick it up, when he gives it to you hold the very tip of his toe. This is a power position and you have more of a chance holding on this way. If you have to let go, that's ok. Just rub him until he relaxes then start again. You don't want to punish him, he's just scared.

When the farrier does come out, I would be VERY CLEAR that he is to take his time and be VERY PATIENT. If the farrier is not, then the horse's confidence will not improve.
spirithorse:

I don't think the crux of the problem is fear as I could pick it up the other day it was when I started cleaning it that he squealed and kicked. It was most definitely a pain issue to me. He's fine with ropes, touching the leg and everything, his issue comes when you start doing anything with the hoof. We have done heaps of ground work over the last little while and in every other way he is 100% better than when we got him. I can even brush him while he's eating which may not sound like much at all, but trust me, its huge lol

My farrier is brilliant. I spoke to him about the probs when I rang to organise it all. He is very patient, gentle and knowledgeable. This is the only reason I continue using him. I was amazed when I first got him out. Im used to farriers being a little rough if the horse isnt cooperating but he just strokes, them says 'whoah bub' and tries again. I wouldnt have it any other way.

And for the record, I never have nor would punish him for reacting cause I know he has had past issues with the farrier and understand he isnt going to be overly keen. Thing is, when my vet was out the other day to look at my mares eye, he saw jarreds hoof and suggested I get it done sooner rather than later or I would have bigger issues to contend with. My view is we can only try. If jarred gets freaked out and doesnt want anything to do with it, then we will stop and try again later.

Jwhisperj - he isnt worried by new people either. I tested this on tuesday by bringing some friends out and he was actually better with them than he is with us lol the bonding and calming things we have been doing are working wonders (thanks frank bell :))

Sweetypie16 - as I've already touched on, my farrier is awesome. He has his own horses and seems to have no noticeable fear ever. Very gentle man for a 6'5" brick %$#& house lol (sorry for the people overseas who would have no idea what that is :)) I spent a while talking to him on the phone today and he knows the whole scenario and didnt seem phased. When I asked him if it would be a problem for him he just laughed and said "only if he kicks me" lol im pretty picky about who deals with my horses and to be honest, he is the ONLY one up here I would use (out of the ones I know anyways).

I will be working with him more than usual over the next few days I just want to be armed if anything happens.

Thanks for everyones input :)
     
    10-18-2007, 07:58 AM
  #6
Showing
Quick fix (just for one or 2 times) is to keep him occupied with grain. Yes, that's not best way to go at all, but sometime you have no choice. When I did my unhandled youngster, I did use grain twice otherwise my farrier wasn't able to trim her (he's great guy and VERY gentle and patient with horses, and in fact didn't want using grain, but after 1 hour trying different methods we had no choice).

Your horse may be in pain (than the farrier may tell you what's wrong) or just was let go this way. If second, timing and patience will improve it (took me about 2 months to make my both untrained to pick up hoofs and stand quietly).

In any case good luck with trimming! (who knows - he can like your farrier a lot and stand for him).
     
    10-18-2007, 08:15 AM
  #7
Showing
Is your farrier able to give injections? If so I would suggest a sedative. My farrier will give a sedative (he does teeth floating). Or maybe an over the counter calming agent. At the very least I would give some painkiller before he arrived. Let us know how it goes.

Side note, I do know what "built like a brick #@*% house" means
     
    10-18-2007, 10:26 AM
  #8
Foal
Well that is good that he isn't afraid of strangers! Boy that would really help me out! Ha Ha.
I too have the frank bell videos!! I think that he has some great suggestions! It has really helped Gus out. We still are having trouble with the rope around the bum to turn though.

Good Luck and like you said there is no harm in trying!
Let us know how it goes, I may have some Q's for you if you get him done!!
     
    10-18-2007, 11:12 AM
  #9
Showing
I tried the calming injection on my 2nd one though - didn't work at all. She didn't let the farrier even come close, so I ended up with no trim for couple month till I taught her to hold hoofs. She's not that common though: she broke vet's teeth tool after 2(!) sedative shots and kick him off the stall. Vet said never seen anything like that before. So I'm working on that slowly.
     
    10-18-2007, 05:39 PM
  #10
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by kitten_Val
Quick fix (just for one or 2 times) is to keep him occupied with grain. Yes, that's not best way to go at all, but sometime you have no choice. When I did my unhandled youngster, I did use grain twice otherwise my farrier wasn't able to trim her (he's great guy and VERY gentle and patient with horses, and in fact didn't want using grain, but after 1 hour trying different methods we had no choice).

Your horse may be in pain (than the farrier may tell you what's wrong) or just was let go this way. If second, timing and patience will improve it (took me about 2 months to make my both untrained to pick up hoofs and stand quietly).

In any case good luck with trimming! (who knows - he can like your farrier a lot and stand for him).
i thought about that but my farrier doesnt approve lol but I will be a little forceful if needed :) im sure his pain is coming from the big split in the hoof. I could be wrong but that's the only visible sign.

Jwhisperj - frank bell is quite good. I know there are others out there but why change what aint broke lol will let you know how it all goes :)

Vidaloco - im not sure if he can give injections its never come up. But I will ask. If not, I could have my vet on hand. What is suggested as pain killer if injections can't be given?

Lol I thought the brick $%^& house was an aussie thing
     

Quick Reply
Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:49 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0