Ground manners=ack!
   

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Horse Training

Ground manners=ack!

This is a discussion on Ground manners=ack! within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Mannersack

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    05-24-2008, 06:24 PM
  #1
Weanling
Ground manners=ack!

Today was the first day I went out to spend time with Spree, as my lease just started. Man, for a horse that's a dream to ride, she has some awful ground manners that need to be remedied stat.

She's antsy, period. I guess today was particularly bad, her owner said, because she was being a total snot. She doesn't like to stand or stop moving. That's the worst issue. She'll crowd your space, which her owner taught me a great way of dealing with, but what's the toughest issue is that she will not stand still when we were trying to saddle her. It was such a joke today that I couldn't imagine how this girl does it without help! She dances all over the place, swings her rump around, etc. We tried moving with her as tried to walk forward but making her move in a circle and then (this is after the saddle was on her back) tightening the girth when she stopped. But basically whenever we'd move toward her with the saddle/saddle pad, she'd move away. And we'd make her keep moving until she was paying attention. Lather, rinse and repeat for a half an hour. I'm sure she associates the saddle with having to work and is just being a booger about it, but it's a serious issue that needs working on. Thoughts? We tried it while she was tied, while one of us was holding her head and the other trying to tack up...I read the other thread about a horse not standing and how many suggested to just let them stay tied and get used to it, but this is more of a tack up issue than a grooming one.

She moves around a bit while being groomed and never had her feet picked up much, but I worked with her on that for a few minutes and she showed a lot of improvement quickly. She's incredibly smart and learns quickly, but today was being the snottiest mare ever. Any thought/suggestions greatly appreciated. I'm going out there tomorrow, and would give anything a shot (and will share the knowledge w/her owner too).
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    05-24-2008, 10:28 PM
  #2
Weanling
Do you have access to crossties?
     
    05-24-2008, 10:54 PM
  #3
Weanling
Hm. She's at the owner's facility that isn't a full-service barn, and I don't know about cross-ties. I asked the owner (a HS aged girl) if she cross-ties with Spree and she said she hasn't really.

I think it's something I should look into though, not only for addressing the issue now, but I'm moving her to a boarding facility closer to me at the end of the summer and I don't want her acting up on the ground while other people are trying to work with their horses.

Any suggestions if I can't figure out a way to cross-tie?
     
    05-25-2008, 02:27 AM
  #4
Foal
tacking up

I bet if you spent some time just kinda throwing the saddle pad on her and then taking it off--repeatedly, she would improve after a couple of sessions. I do that with my youngsters that are antsy and after a while they just get bored with having to react to it. I also tie them up to feed them their grain and clean in the mornings. It's amazing what it will do for their patience if they are tied for a couple of hours here and there. Good luck
     
    05-25-2008, 03:35 AM
  #5
Trained
Dont cross tie her! It wont solve anything. If she is swinging around she can still do this even if she is cross tied.

It might be a good idea to treat her as though she was a yearling with respect issues. Horses that invade our space usually have issues with respect. When she gets in her space move her out straight away. It must be straight away and you must move her back out of your space. Don't smack her or yell at her just back her up to a desirable distance. You may have to growl a little but you can be more effective but throwing your arms up and moving her back using your body (but not touching her) if that makes sense.

With regards to the saddling I would suggest 'asking your horse for permission' to saddle her. It seems she really isnt comfortable with the process. If you have a lunge yard or an arena to work in (lunge yard would be best) and bring your saddle etc in with you and leave it in the middle of the yard. Take her in and spend some time fussing over her and grooming her and making the whole experience enjoyable. Allow her to sniff the saddle and investigate it obviously without stepping on it or chewing it :) after a while pick up the saddle blanket. See how she reacts and show her the blanket up close. Let her sniff it and once she acts as though so could care less about it rub it down her neck and shoulder until you get to her back. If she looks worried keep rubbing her with the blanket but talk to her and calm her. Once SHE is ready, put the blanket on her back. Leave it there for that day, praise her and give her some dinner. Do the same thing the next day and if she accepts the blanket without fuss do the same thing with the saddle and then the bridle and so on. The idea is to wait until she is ready to give permission for you to saddle her. If you have permission from your horse you will have less problems.

Having said all that, it may be worth getting a vet to check her over to make sure she isnt sore anywhere and that's whats making her fidgety when being saddle
     
    05-25-2008, 09:07 AM
  #6
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzyrider
dont cross tie her! It wont solve anything. If she is swinging around she can still do this even if she is cross tied.

It might be a good idea to treat her as though she was a yearling with respect issues. Horses that invade our space usually have issues with respect. When she gets in her space move her out straight away. It must be straight away and you must move her back out of your space. Don't smack her or yell at her just back her up to a desirable distance. You may have to growl a little but you can be more effective but throwing your arms up and moving her back using your body (but not touching her) if that makes sense.

With regards to the saddling I would suggest 'asking your horse for permission' to saddle her. It seems she really isnt comfortable with the process. If you have a lunge yard or an arena to work in (lunge yard would be best) and bring your saddle etc in with you and leave it in the middle of the yard. Take her in and spend some time fussing over her and grooming her and making the whole experience enjoyable. Allow her to sniff the saddle and investigate it obviously without stepping on it or chewing it :) after a while pick up the saddle blanket. See how she reacts and show her the blanket up close. Let her sniff it and once she acts as though so could care less about it rub it down her neck and shoulder until you get to her back. If she looks worried keep rubbing her with the blanket but talk to her and calm her. Once SHE is ready, put the blanket on her back. Leave it there for that day, praise her and give her some dinner. Do the same thing the next day and if she accepts the blanket without fuss do the same thing with the saddle and then the bridle and so on. The idea is to wait until she is ready to give permission for you to saddle her. If you have permission from your horse you will have less problems.

Having said all that, it may be worth getting a vet to check her over to make sure she isnt sore anywhere and that's whats making her fidgety when being saddle
I wondered if cross-tying would help with the moving issue; I was thinking about that after I posted last night. The respect issue is something that her trainer worked with her on, and her owner walked me through what to do when she's crowding my space. It's basically just what you're talking about: backing her up with arms being tossed up in a kind of flinging motion and stopping when she's a good distance away. Because she has issues just standing, if she starts to turn in and walk when she's supposed to be moving, I glare at her butt and march toward it to keep her circling until she brings her outside eye to face me. I have good tools to address that, so it's a start.

Good suggestions on the "asking." I can tell it's not a fear issue, because we definitely let her sniff both the saddle and saddle pad yesterday, and she seemed very nonchalant about it. I could totally be projecting here, but her moving to get away seemed naughty and not fearful or mistrusting. And she's actually fine with bridling, which is odd. Again, yesterday was a particularly bad day, as her owner had had her out the previous day and said things had gone great. But I can try both what you and dusty suggested and see how that goes. Thanks!
     
    05-25-2008, 03:11 PM
  #7
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzyrider
dont cross tie her! It wont solve anything. If she is swinging around she can still do this even if she is cross tied....
I agree, what she ideally needs is some time with you in a roundpen.
     
    05-25-2008, 07:40 PM
  #8
Weanling
Today was much better. We decided, instead of fighting with her for an hour and getting nowhere, we'd begin with lunging her in a lunge pen. I was just watching and learning, and her owner just began by completely free lunging her (no lunge line). She was definitely full of beans, but is very responsive to body language when being free lunged. After she lunged Spree that way for a bit, she tried putting the tack on her. Any time Spree would move as the saddle blanket/saddle was being put on, her owner would start working her again. This kept up for awhile until she finally stood to have both the blanket and saddle put on. THAT was all very encouraging. I realize she's a young horse with a lot of energy, so lunging like that seems to be necessary for her at this point.

Unfortunately, she would still circle slowly while her owner was trying to tighten the cinch, so that's still something we need to work on.

I rode her for about a half an hour after all this, and she was terrific. As she was cooling down, I walked her around on lead and worked on her respecting my space and walking with me properly.
     
    05-25-2008, 07:46 PM
  #9
Weanling
Great news, keep working with her on the ground.
     
    06-02-2008, 08:26 PM
  #10
Foal
Re: Ground manners=ack!

Quote:
Originally Posted by missy06
...I read the other thread about a horse not standing and how many suggested to just let them stay tied and get used to it, but this is more of a tack up issue than a grooming one.
I haven't read this post that you referenced about tying, buy I think that is a miracle worker for so many ground manner problems. It basically comes down to giving to pressure. They eventually teach themselves that to find some peace, they must give to pressure rather than pulling against it. ..... Your horse should be tied in a safe, secure area for a long period of time. Go on certain days and do this INSTEAD of riding or doing anything else with your horse.
     

Thread Tools



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:37 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0