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Groundwork?

This is a discussion on Groundwork? within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

     
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        09-11-2008, 01:58 AM
      #21
    Yearling
    SonnyWimps, thanks for explaining why you lead as you do, at least I understand where you are coming from. I'm not convinced that horses view us the way you do, but as long as you both are happy and it works for you, more power to you! It's my personal choice to have a horse lead at my shoulder, beside me. I don't want to have to worry about a horse behind me, and yes, I've had horses bolt in a straight line. I want to be able to see my horse and it's reaction as I'm leading it. If it shows concern, I'm right there, with it...not reacting after the fact or taking up 5 to 10 feet of slack. I will also warn you that not all horses will view "following behind you" as you being the "lead horse"...especially if the horse is a high minded horse who can easily view this kind of "leading" not as "following behind the lead horse", but as "herding" you....that is when you have a horse who bites you in the back or one that will physically push you forward if you are not moving as fast as they think you should. And under NO circumstance should you ever lead a stallion behind you!

    Just my .02 cents worth...
         
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        09-11-2008, 02:02 AM
      #22
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Horse Poor
    SonnyWimps, thanks for explaining why you lead as you do, at least I understand where you are coming from. I'm not convinced that horses view us the way you do, but as long as you both are happy and it works for you, more power to you! It's my personal choice to have a horse lead at my shoulder, beside me. I don't want to have to worry about a horse behind me, and yes, I've had horses bolt in a straight line. I want to be able to see my horse and it's reaction as I'm leading it. If it shows concern, I'm right there, with it...not reacting after the fact or taking up 5 to 10 feet of slack. I will also warn you that not all horses will view "following behind you" as you being the "lead horse"...especially if the horse is a high minded horse who can easily view this kind of "leading" not as "following behind the lead horse", but as "herding" you....that is when you have a horse who bites you in the back or one that will physically push you forward if you are not moving as fast as they think you should. And under NO circumstance should you ever lead a stallion behind you!

    Just my .02 cents worth...
    thankyou! Someone understands
         
        09-11-2008, 02:06 AM
      #23
    Weanling
    I would say that if your horse is biting you from behind, and not respecting you whatsoever...

    Do some ground exercises...some serious miscommunication has occurred. I've been kicked intentionally because I efd up. Usually, the behavior issues are due to ignorance on our part.

    Of course horses don't view us as horses, but just being with your horse and spending time in their world can bring you so much closer.

    So many times I see people into horses that really just want control, and all I can feel is sorry for both horse and human.
         
        09-11-2008, 09:11 AM
      #24
    Started
    I lead my horse beside me, but I do make him respect my personal space. No matter how you prefer to lead...teaching them to respect your space is very important! If my horse makes an attempt to get to close (without an invitation) or pushy or trys to get in front of me or behind me...i apply pressure and move him over, or up or back or whatever is necessary. I think that if a horse gets spooked.... he moves so quickly that you really arent going to have warning if he's behind you. I know that's the case with Major anyway. Sometimes I can see it coming though, if he sees something ahead that makes him nervous. Sometimes he just has spooky days though (for lack of a better term) where he's full of energy and just kinda jumpy...and on those days..im really glad he has learned to respect my space :P
         
        09-11-2008, 10:45 AM
      #25
    Super Moderator
    I like my horse to be beside me, but somewhat behind. I want his head next to me, his shoulder behind. I don't want him behind me because I can't see what he's doing. Horses can bolt in any direction, not just sideways. Alot of times a young horse will bolt TOWARDS the person leading them fi they are scared. I want to know what my horse is doing at all times.

    I would prefer the horse behind me though then right beside me. I think in someways it's just preference.

    Sonny, I agree with you some about the longing, BUT I think it depends on who is doign the longing and why. Some people do just run them in circles to tire them out and that doesnt always help. When I longe it is somewhat to get the fussies out but I also use training devices becuase my longing efforts are to help w/ balance and collection so that's groundwork. And it's not always fun. But i'm not a parelli fan. Doesnt mean I don't do things that fall under the parelli ways (I did not learn things from parelli but I have seen things explained by parelli people that I already use).

    I've also seen training methods by John Lyons that overlap w/ some of the Parelli methods. My big thing is... if it works. Use it... But I'm not glued to specific ways....

    I think I'm preaching, here someone take this soap box away from me! I'm out of control!!!
         
        09-11-2008, 10:57 AM
      #26
    Weanling
    Hahahaha- *removes from soapbox* (I usually get stuck up there too!!! Feel free to remove me at any time)

    I guess I'm spoiled because Willy's 16! He knows the drills, plus he's flippin' bomb proof. So sane I trust him fully during any excursion. His spooks are so rare, and so silly...he's never bolted!

    I guess it all comes down to the individual horse....I guess that's why there are so many training methods.
         
        09-11-2008, 01:10 PM
      #27
    Started
    Re: Groundwork?

    [quote="FutureVetGirl"]Ok... so I've heard a TON about doing groundwork with a horse. Now... I know the basic concept of it... (doing stuff on the ground with the horse, not riding the horse, yet training without riding the horse...etc).

    BUT... what all does that entail? Is that like lunging? Leading? Grooming? What? I'm just kind of confused about all of that.
    /quote]

    We're working on installing buttons. We kind of joke around by saying that they forgot to install buttons at the factory. Working on buttons on the ground is a good way to bond and play games while the horse is learning. We have buttons in front and in back (on side). We also have a button in the chest. A button on the poll means the horse lowers head and buttons on chestnuts mean you lift up your feet. Also, we use a lead rope teach a horse that you never show your bottom to me. We teach things like if there's something caught around your foot you come towards me. I'm the one who is going to fix your problem. I talk to the horse all the time and use his name. That way he comes when I call him.
         
        09-11-2008, 03:38 PM
      #28
    Foal
    My reason for considering in more safe to walk a horse where you can see it has already been explained. You can see what the horse is looking at, when. You can also prepare yourself for an attack because instead of knowing when the rope tightens or when the horse has already run you over/bolted, you can react quicker. Lol, The baby situation is so true!!! I teach my young ones to lead by walking in a circle in the round pen, giving and releasing as they come toward me and accept the pressure, but that also means they go through a period of change where they are then supposed to walk beside me. I've had a couple jump into me while they were spooking from a dangerous water trough :roll: Babies do such goofy things when they are introduced to something new!

    Yes, I also maintain some space between me and the horse I'm walking, also they know that when I step into them, they need to go the other way (at least my buckskin does, my other yearling doesn't move as quickly on her hind end, so I sometimes bump her with my shoulder).

    Everyone does different things that works for some animals, doesn't for others. We each also may have different reasons for doing what we think is right, and that's all right because its your horse and you, and my horse with me, if that makes any sense, lol.
         
        09-12-2008, 09:41 PM
      #29
    Foal
    I lunge my horse 1. To get him to focus on me and 2. To warm him up well.
    Horses (especially show/performance horses) are athletes. Do you go to a track/volleyball/basket ball game and just get right into work? Nope, you stretch and warm up first. That's what I'm doing to my horse when lunging him. Some days I'll skip the lunging, but then I have to do double the warming up when riding him. He's a western pleasure horse, so I don't just get on him and expect him to go slow. For me and my horse, going slow isn't the goal, it's the reward. He gets his butt worked and warmed up well (lunging and riding) so when it's time for my class he's ready to rock back and chill. :)
         

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