GRRRR! MY HORSE..........(rant/cry for help)
 
 

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GRRRR! MY HORSE..........(rant/cry for help)

This is a discussion on GRRRR! MY HORSE..........(rant/cry for help) within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • My horse puffs out his belly whenever I try to put the girth on what do I do
  • Horse race grrrr

 
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    04-12-2010, 12:10 PM
  #1
Started
Angry GRRRR! MY HORSE..........(rant/cry for help)

My horse is starting to drive me nuts. He is an OTTSTB and is sound and everything. We will be trotting along and when I pull back on the reins to get him to slow up a little (especially downhill) he holds his head like a giraffe and does not slow down. Also, I think it is affecting his balance. I cannot turn him while trotting without him going off balance and walking. ATM I am using a mullen mouth pelham with double reins. Also ANY bit I put in his mouth, he chews on constantly. Even with the flash!!!!!! ARGHHH!!!!!! He is terribly impatient, too! I will stop him to talk to somebody and he paws the ground,doesnt stand still, and chews on his bit. What can I do to solve all these annoying problems?
     
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    04-12-2010, 12:11 PM
  #2
Started
HE ALSO PUFFS HIS BELLY OUT WHEN I TIGHTEN THE GIRTH!!!! What do I do????
     
    04-12-2010, 12:29 PM
  #3
Green Broke
Get a trainer!
     
    04-12-2010, 12:30 PM
  #4
Banned
Has he been retrained? If not, pulling back on the reins for a race horse means you want them to go faster. That's why it's so very important for an ex-racer to be retrained once they come off the track.

Why are you using double reins since you're only trail riding? Is there any particular reason you're using a mullen mouth and a flash noseband? Unless you're showing, there's no real reason for you to use such equipment.

When was the last time you had his teeth checked? Besides the mullen being rather severe, his chewing may be because his teeth need to be floated.

As far as the pawing, it probably means he's still full of beans and wants to go. Sounds like he needs more exercise than you're giving him.

Many horses do the belly blow up when they're being girthed. It's a learned behaviour, and not likely something you can unteach him. What I've found works best is to get the horse girthed, let them relax, and then tighten more by degrees.

Lungeing will often get them to relax, and you can tighten the girth then.

You sound relatively inexperienced. That's not a bad thing, because none of us started out in horses knowing anything. It just appears that you don't really have a clue why your horse is giving you trouble.

It does appear that your horse is overbitted, may need his teeth done, possibly needs more training, and might be a tad spoiled.

If you're not already working with a trainer for yourself, I'd suggest that too. You both could probably use the help of a good professional.
     
    04-12-2010, 12:42 PM
  #5
Yearling
I would recommend getting his teeth floated.
     
    04-12-2010, 12:47 PM
  #6
Started
A prof. Trainer suggested the pelham to relax the jaw and so far it has worked well for him as the snaffle pulls his head up and hollows his back. The flash is to keep his mouth shut. His teeth were very recently done. He is retired. Has been for a while. He knows that rein pressure means stop. He only throws his head up in the field when he is heading towards the barn. I have no money for a trainer so that is why I came here
     
    04-12-2010, 12:48 PM
  #7
Started
He had his teeth done last mo.
     
    04-12-2010, 12:54 PM
  #8
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by Speed Racer    
Has he been retrained? If not, pulling back on the reins for a race horse means you want them to go faster. That's why it's so very important for an ex-racer to be retrained once they come off the track.

Why are you using double reins since you're only trail riding? Is there any particular reason you're using a mullen mouth and a flash noseband? Unless you're showing, there's no real reason for you to use such equipment.

When was the last time you had his teeth checked? Besides the mullen being rather severe, his chewing may be because his teeth need to be floated.

As far as the pawing, it probably means he's still full of beans and wants to go. Sounds like he needs more exercise than you're giving him.

Many horses do the belly blow up when they're being girthed. It's a learned behaviour, and not likely something you can unteach him. What I've found works best is to get the horse girthed, let them relax, and then tighten more by degrees.

Lungeing will often get them to relax, and you can tighten the girth then.

You sound relatively inexperienced. That's not a bad thing, because none of us started out in horses knowing anything. It just appears that you don't really have a clue why your horse is giving you trouble.

It does appear that your horse is overbitted, may need his teeth done, possibly needs more training, and might be a tad spoiled.

If you're not already working with a trainer for yourself, I'd suggest that too. You both could probably use the help of a good professional.
This.

I strongly suggest getting a qualified professional to come and check him over. You want to make sure that his teeth are floated (just like humans they need to have their teeth checked and floated at least once per year) - have you ever had a sore tooth? It hurts like heck and you can't think of anything but that tooth... ouch! Then having someone yank on something in your mouth? Double ouch! Then I would have a look at the bit you're using. Pelhams are great and they have their place... but a lot of people misuse them. Many people use them for control, rather than finesse - this is incorrect. If you're relying on the curb rein for control, it really isn't surprising that the horse is throwing its head up - a lot of horses will have that reaction to the curb chain. Why are you riding in that bit? Also, imo a flash should never be used with a curb bit. I dislike flashes anyways, but a flash and a curb almost drive me batty.
Secondly, I think you want to look at having a professional check your saddle fit. An improperly fitting saddle can make a horse act out. My friend just had a saddle fitter out to check her saddle - it turns out that the saddle is much too narrow and is causing deep muscle bruising. You can actually lame a horse with a bad saddle. The horse can act out in some of the following ways: throwing its head up, not listening to cues, balking, bucking, rearing, bolting.
Have you ever seen a standardbred run? They are taught to brace against the bit (read: they PULL against the bit) and run like that. If your horse hasn't been properly reconditioned and retrained from the track, he could just be doing what he was taught to do on the track - he's not bad, he just hasn't been taught any other way. More to the point, when you're riding correctly, "whoa" comes from the seat, and NOT the reins...

All in all.. I think that a good trainer would be beneficial for you to learn to ride this horse effectively and correctly :)

     
    04-12-2010, 01:05 PM
  #9
Banned
Thank you for the additional info, JDI. Very good points.

I dislike severe bits and flash nosebands, too. Control is all about correct training, not using harsh bits and clamping their mouths shut.

I use the softest, easiest bit available for my horses. Yes, even on my spooky, reactive Arab gelding. He responds more to my voice, seat and legs than he does to the bit, and that's the way it's supposed to work.

Using harsh equipment is the lazy/untrained person's way of controlling their animal, and it angers me.

There's no substitute for proper training, for both the rider and horse.

The purchase price is the least amount of money you'll ever pay concerning a horse. If you don't have the funds for proper training, that's as neglectful as not being able to feed them IMO. Unless they're only going to be pasture poufs, then proper training under saddle isn't a requirement.
     
    04-12-2010, 01:06 PM
  #10
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by Horseychick94    
The flash is to keep his mouth shut.
Eep.. okay. This is not the use of a flash. The flash is not to be used to keep a horse's mouth shut, though a lot of people think that's what it's for. It is not. If you are using it as one, you are just covering a deeper problem that needs to be solved.

Okay... let me try to put this to an analogy... imagine your back is hurting somewhere, but you can't talk. How do you show a person that you're hurt? Let's say you have to carry a backpack for 2 hours a day, but that backpack doesn't sit nicely on your back. Let's add a few bricks in there for the sake of argument. So you have a heavy backpack that doesn't feel good on your back. Now go for a bit of a walk and a run with it. How do you feel? Did you want to say "ow" a few times, or talk? Yes? Okay, I'm duct-taping your mouth shut. Now you can't talk or protest or make any movements that tell me you're hurting with your mouth. Now what do you do? Okay, go for a bit of a "trot" and try to make a sharp turn without breaking gait. Now trot and stop suddenly - I bet you do some pretty funky footwork or you hollow out your back to try and avoid pressure on your back.

My point is that your horse is trying to tell you something. He's trying to say that something somewhere isn't right - and you need to fix it. My gut says that your saddle isn't fitting properly.
     

Tags
chewing bit, headset, help me, impatient horse

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