GRRRR! MY HORSE..........(rant/cry for help) - Page 17
 
 

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GRRRR! MY HORSE..........(rant/cry for help)

This is a discussion on GRRRR! MY HORSE..........(rant/cry for help) within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

     
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        04-16-2010, 11:25 AM
      #161
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by sarahver    
    Hey, I couldn't resist putting my 2 cents worth in here since my favourite thing in the world is to re train ex racehorses.

    Your boy sounds to me like a perfectly normal horse off the track, they have two paces: Flat out and Stop. So when you ask them for other paces e.g. Walk, trot, canter, they don't understand and become frustrated (evident as pawing the ground, tossing the head, swishing the tail).

    First thing I would do with a horse off the track is turn them out to pasture for 6 months to allow them time to work all the high energy food and other additives out of their system. Allow them some time to recover from the high stress environment of racing (racing industry is very hard on horses and you need to be very aware of that).

    When you bring them back in, please please please use a snaffle to begin with. If you start with something more harsh you will never bring them back from it and I assure you, you will not get them working nicely for you, they will simply work IN SPITE of you, there's a difference!

    Make sure their food is composed of mostly fibre, watch how much protein you feed them as they are sensitive to high energy diets and will 'fizz up' overnight! This make take some time to figure out what works as each horse is different. Feel free to add multi vitamins such as magnesium, selenium, zinc, vitamin E to make up for lack of grains but make sure they are proportional.

    Last piece of advice: Be patient! All his behaviours are very typical of an ex racehorse so don't be too concerned. However if you want a horse that you can ride without too much fuss, don't get a horse off the track. EVER. It could take another 6 months before he really adjusts to his new lifestyle and is happy to wait for you while you are talking to someone during your ride.

    If all this sounds like a lot of work and time, it is. I only do it cos I love it! Once they are working nicely and well trained, I'm pretty much looking for the next newbie I can start with. Make sure you choose a horse carefully to suit your needs.

    Good luck!
    Thanks! I got him because I trained my mini and rehabbed her and I wanted my first BIG project lol. THANKS SO MUCH FOR THE ADVICE!!!!! I will absorb it all and will check his feed
         
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        04-16-2010, 11:37 AM
      #162
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by sarahver    
    Hey, I couldn't resist putting my 2 cents worth in here since my favourite thing in the world is to re train ex racehorses.

    Your boy sounds to me like a perfectly normal horse off the track, they have two paces: Flat out and Stop. So when you ask them for other paces e.g. Walk, trot, canter, they don't understand and become frustrated (evident as pawing the ground, tossing the head, swishing the tail).
    I have to completely disagree. Horses off the track know ALL of their gaits. They don't gallop to the starting gates, they walk. They aren't galloped at full speed during their morning work outs, they're trot/cantered to warm up, then hand galloped. They may not know leg cues, voice cues, etc and they may not at first be able to do them well with a rider on their backs because they are imbalanced, but they do know how to control their bodies to achieve these gaits. I do agree, just as with training any horse, not just OTT horses, you have to be patient.

    Also, I believe horseychicks horse is a STB, so he was a cart horse in a previous life.
         
        04-16-2010, 12:17 PM
      #163
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by justsambam08    
    I have to completely disagree. Horses off the track know ALL of their gaits. They don't gallop to the starting gates, they walk. They aren't galloped at full speed during their morning work outs, they're trot/cantered to warm up, then hand galloped.
    This is a good point, I should clarify what I meant:

    The two things that are DEVELOPED and ENCOURAGED in a race horse is how to gallop and making sure they pull up after a race. What else is enforced? It is true that they walk to the gates however when was the last time you saw a racehorse walking quietly to the gates and standing there patiently? In my experience it is walk, go sideways for a bit, trot if you can get away with it, canter on the spot for a while, rear up if you are particularly annoyed with the slow pace.

    During workouts, sure they trot but what is the trot leading up to? Hand gallop. What is the canter leading to? Hand gallop. Horses are smart and know what to expect, meaning they associate their paces with leading up to a high energy pace, opposite to what we often want them to do in general riding. Just takes time to undo the association with the two.

    Sorry for poor wording
         
        04-16-2010, 12:35 PM
      #164
    Weanling
    OP, I'm glad you have a trainer helping you. I'm not going to say that a teenager can't train a horse because I am watching one do it right now, but she is definitely one of the exceptions. I work with teenagers all day, every day. I know what they are capable of. I have some serious cowgirls in my classes; girls who have been raised around horses, who have been barrel racing since they were 4 and who's parents train horses for a living, and most of them are not capable of the specialized training that your horse needs.

    The teenager I mentioned at the beginning is one of the most knowlegable horse-women I've met. She is currently training her 5 year old Paint gelding. She's been riding him for a year, but she's still training (and probably will be for his life)...The key is that she trains WITH a trainer. She is riding the horse, she is doing the work, yet she has a professional (who by the way, seeks help from other professionals all the time) guiding her. I think a true horse trainer is never done learning, just as every ride is essentially a training session.

    A teenager who admittedly doesn't have a ton of experience should NOT be discounted as capable of training/retraining a horse, but that same teenager should never think that they can do it themselves, or that the job is ever finished. I train dogs. My dad trains dogs and has all of my life. When I was faced with a particularly challenging dog, I in no way thought I could do it myself. I did come to a forum like this for suggestions, and I had a professional trainer friend on speed dial and spoke with him regularly...I also took my dog to his facility once a week for mentoring. I conquered that battle, but I am not afraid to admit that the next dog will also challenge me and I'll probably need help.

    I think the key is that when you ask for help you may not like what you're going to get told, but more often than not, what you don't want to hear is exactly what you need to hear.

    OP, I wish you the best of luck. I hope your challenges are met, and you and your horse become a great team, but please don't ask for help and suggestions, then get upset when you don't hear what you want to hear.
         
        04-16-2010, 02:16 PM
      #165
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Horseychick94    
    I agree 100%. Trainer is coming out Tuesday
    I'm very happy that you agree because far too many people think the quick fix is a good idea. Good luck with the trainer, keep us posted!
         
        04-16-2010, 09:32 PM
      #166
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by justsambam08    
    I have to completely disagree. Horses off the track know ALL of their gaits. They don't gallop to the starting gates, they walk. They aren't galloped at full speed during their morning work outs, they're trot/cantered to warm up, then hand galloped. They may not know leg cues, voice cues, etc and they may not at first be able to do them well with a rider on their backs because they are imbalanced, but they do know how to control their bodies to achieve these gaits. I do agree, just as with training any horse, not just OTT horses, you have to be patient.

    Also, I believe horseychicks horse is a STB, so he was a cart horse in a previous life.
    True. My horse was a pacer and still does occasionally but I correct him
         
        04-16-2010, 09:33 PM
      #167
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by kmdstar    
    I'm very happy that you agree because far too many people think the quick fix is a good idea. Good luck with the trainer, keep us posted!
    Thanks! I will
         

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    chewing bit, headset, help me, impatient horse

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