Have you ever heard a horse to be trained to stop like this?
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Horse Training

Have you ever heard a horse to be trained to stop like this?

This is a discussion on Have you ever heard a horse to be trained to stop like this? within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Stop have you ever heard

Like Tree13Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    12-23-2012, 08:37 PM
  #1
Weanling
Have you ever heard a horse to be trained to stop like this?

My friend rescued a mare who was abandoned. She got the weight back on her, and fixed the hooves for the most part and she is sound to ride. Friends of the previous owner mentioned she was very well broke. I got on her (in a closed off arena just to be on the safe side) and she rides very nicely. Except when it comes to stopping, and I got thrown out of the arena when she almost collided with the fence. After I recovered, I talked to the same people. Apparently she was trained to stop by yanking twice on the reins. I tried it, and it worked. It is not very convenient though.

Anyways, my friend is now leasing her horse to me, and I want to try and work this out of her. If I pull back on the reins normally (as long as were walking), she will stop after about ten steps. How could I get her to stop normally? I figured just constant pressure on the reins, and she'll learn that the quicker she stops, the quicker I will release the pressure.

Any better ideas? Thanks.
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    12-23-2012, 08:52 PM
  #2
Green Broke
I think if I was in your situation, I would probably go back to groundwork. Get her stopping verbally on "whoa". When in the saddle, use the verbal "whoa" to stop. Once she's doing that nicely then start putting in your nonverbal cues just before the verbal "whoa". If you are consistent and patient, she will start to recognize the nonverbal (or proper) cues and react at that point.

With regard to stopping, I always use a sequence of weight shift followed by repositioning of the leg followied by reins. This happens in quick succession by the way. Once you get good at this, you will find you very seldom need to use reins. Just pulling on the reins until the horse stops is counterproductive and will hinder you when you go into more advanced training.

Good luck.
     
    12-23-2012, 09:32 PM
  #3
Weanling
Here's how I train a stop:

First a little background. I have two verbal commands I use: "Whoa" or "Ho", and "Hup". I use either, depending on what's going on. If I'm trying to get a horse to stand, I tend to use "whoa/ho". When I'm in the saddle moving and want a stop, I use "hup". Don't know why, just my style, but the horse recognizes both. I am presupposing that ground work has been done and your horse understands how to go, stop, w/t/c/, etc.

Start out at a walk. When you are prepared to stop, say "Hup!", then, within about 1/2 second, sit hard in the saddle, feet a little forward to brace you against the stop, and snug up the reins to give a little pressure on the bit. At first you may need a little extra pressure on the bit, which is why I normally do this training with a bosal first. You don't really need to pull the reins, just sit hard in the saddle and your body will naturally lean back a little. This should provide sufficient "pull" on the reins to give a good signal. Giving the verbal signal before the seat and reins, in my experience, gives the horse a "heads-up" as to what's coming and helps him comply better with my body cues.

At first the horse will probably take a few steps before stopping. As he does so, increase the pressure on the reins to get the stop and continue to bring them back a little more to require a couple steps backwards. As soon as he takes the steps backwards, release the reins, sit up, and praise the horse with a pat or rub on the neck. Once he stops taking extra steps, you release the pressure as soon as he stops solidly.

Do that until the horse stops without taking any extra steps. It should be a solid stop and might even include a step back, since that is what you were asking for. Once he's doing that at a walk, you can start at trot, and so forth.

It doesn't take long before the horse figures it out and begins to dig his back heels in and start the beginnings of a "sliding stop." As the horse progresses, you will eventually find he responds to your verbal command and seat and your signal with the reins becomes much more subtle.

Hope that helps.
     
    12-24-2012, 03:20 AM
  #4
Foal
I suggest to work with preparing commands. If you have no idea how you have to do that, I will post it here.
     
    12-24-2012, 09:28 AM
  #5
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by jensvl    
I suggest to work with preparing commands. If you have no idea how you have to do that, I will post it here.
I'd like to know what that is and how to do it. Please post it.
     
    12-25-2012, 07:30 AM
  #6
Foal
I will post it in the weekend.
     
    12-25-2012, 08:40 AM
  #7
Green Broke
Try this training video
     
    12-25-2012, 08:55 AM
  #8
Yearling
Whenever I hear 'yank' I can see in my head a person doing one of those good-old-fashioned hit the horse in the mouth with the bit.

My horse is trained to stop in three ways...

1. Voice
2. Seat
3. Legs--spur stop (however I don't really recommend that to anyone other than people who show.)

The ways above that people have said is perfect and I suggest you follow that, maybe kindly suggest to your friend that that's how she should train her horse.

Good luck!
tbrantley likes this.
     
    12-25-2012, 09:36 AM
  #9
Showing
The first pickup of the reins tells the horse there will be a change of pace coming, a forewarning then three or four seconds later the second pickup signals the stop along with weight and leg changes. The first pickup should barely move the bit. If you were running and I said stop, you would run past where I wanted you to stop. But if I give you a warning three seconds ahead you can adjust your momemtum to execute the stop.
     
    12-25-2012, 11:10 AM
  #10
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saddlebag    
The first pickup of the reins tells the horse there will be a change of pace coming, a forewarning then three or four seconds later the second pickup signals the stop along with weight and leg changes. The first pickup should barely move the bit. If you were running and I said stop, you would run past where I wanted you to stop. But if I give you a warning three seconds ahead you can adjust your momemtum to execute the stop.
Interesting concept. I've never tried that (at least not consciously). Does it ever cause problems with the horse breaking stride at the first cue? Sounds like something that could be easily incorporated into the way I train a stop. Maybe I'll give it a try.
     

Tags
mare stop

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
First horse I've trained on my own Waybueno Western Riding 3 11-17-2012 01:31 AM
Has anyone trained their own horse succesfully? Chloezhorseys Horse Talk 52 10-20-2012 11:22 AM
Questions on trained to stop, gather, basics? Jewels Horse Training 3 01-11-2012 01:00 AM
How well trained is your horse? RedTree Horse Training 21 03-17-2011 10:11 PM
Must have a horse this trained... My2Geldings Horse Training 10 06-11-2008 11:45 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:18 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0