He beat me to the punchline today
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Horse Training

He beat me to the punchline today

This is a discussion on He beat me to the punchline today within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Beat me to the punch line
  • Punchline today

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    12-16-2009, 09:11 PM
  #1
Banned
He beat me to the punchline today

So today, I go out to ride Ice and long story short it ends with him taking off towards the gate, me dropping my reins and then bailing out. He's been very "get up and go" ish, and a whole lot brattier, since he discovered that he could canter. That's all he want to do. So, being a race horse, he does it, and forgets about whether I want him to or not. Tomorrow, if I'm able, I'm going to go out and run him in the round pen till he never even thinks of cantering ever again. I also plan on checking the resident western trainers rates at my barn (she follows clinton anderson, just so everyone knows). Anything else that I should do? I would have gotten back on him, but a few people thought I should go get checked out by the ER so that's what I did.

He "knows" how to one rein stop--as in when he feels like bending his neck, he'll do it, but if he stiffens up, I might as well be yanking on a tree trunk. He also, when he's not feeling bratty, understands verbal cues to the point of where I can talk him down from having a fit with my seat and my voice. So that's all good, but is there anything else?
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    12-16-2009, 09:19 PM
  #2
Weanling
Where do you ride? Are you in an arena, ring, round pen. I would take him in the round pen to start and work on transitions, getting him into the canter for a stride or two and then bringing him back down to the trot or walk, etc.
     
    12-16-2009, 09:20 PM
  #3
Yearling
Maybe instead of cantering him, or lounging him at a canter.... Try walking him for abit, and maybe some trotting. But don't go any faster than that. Until he learns to listen to you better..
     
    12-16-2009, 09:23 PM
  #4
Weanling
My mare almost dumped me day before yesterday. She hates being ridden in my english saddle (or bareback) and she went nuts. Luckily I stayed on but I hopped off and grabbed my lunge line and trotted her around until she was puffing. I didn't get back on her (I was at home alone and I have issues riding when no one is home anyway o I wasn't going to get on a bratty horse in case something happened) but I think she got the picture and Im just going to throw the western saddle on from now on. Squirly horses in the weather we rare having.
     
    12-16-2009, 09:35 PM
  #5
Banned
Just to be clear, we were trotting. Or supposed to be trotting. I wanted him to walk so we could go back to the gate, and he said "uhh, NO" and took off. We were riding in the arena at the time. I ride Western to begin with, and he's usually very respectable--until last month I did something he didn't like and he decided to buck and take off....when he figured out he could canter. I stayed on that time, because I managed to keep my reins and get him in to a one rein stop.

My philosophy is if he wants to canter that's fine! And then he'll keep cantering, and keep cantering, and keep cantering.....until I want him to stop. Maybe once he learns there's more work in being bad then being good, he'll listen to me.
     
    12-16-2009, 11:25 PM
  #6
Trained
I agree with you that the horse should maintain the gait you choose until you say otherwise. Ground work will go a long way to get his respect. But eventually you will have to ride him again and it sounds like you need some breaks before you engage the engine. When he jumped into the canter, the best thing to do would have been to shut him down immediately with a one rein stop. When you do get on him again, teach him the one rein stop at the walk, then trot and finally canter. Any time he makes a decision about speed that is contrary to what you want, shut him down right away. It might take a few rides, but eventually he'll figure out that he won't get anywhere with that tactic. Of course then he'll pick another fun one like backing up or something, but that's another post....
     
    12-16-2009, 11:37 PM
  #7
Green Broke
I don't think this is an "oh, yay, I want to canter" situation but more a "I do not respect you and know when I get going there is nothing you can do to stop me" situation.

In this case cantering him until he is exhausted is probably not goignt o help too much.

You need to work on him respecting your every cue at the walk before you move to the trot. Then same for the trot before you canter.

If he is bracing his neck at with the one rein stop and not stopping, you are doing it wrong. It is not just crank his head to the side and hope he stops, he will either do exactly as he is and resist, or keep going and possibly fall and hurt or kill you both.

What he should be doing is moving his hind end away form your leg as you bend his neck, this causes him to mentally change gears from "go" to "turn", and in effect he will slow down and stop.
     
    12-16-2009, 11:47 PM
  #8
Foal
I agree with MyBoyPuck. Only thing I wanted to add is concerning this
Quote:
me dropping my reins and then bailing out
I wouldn't ever do this unless there was no other option like they're running to something that has a low roof and you're going to get raked off or they're about to go off a cliff or something and you can't stop them. Jumping off when they're naughty just trains them that they can train YOU to get off when they want you to. I've ridden several horses where they learned they can get their rider off and you can't trust them enough to let your guard down when riding.

I also think it's more dangerous to jump off a galloping horse. Most people do not know how to land correctly and will get hurt. I always stick with the horse and if I can't stop them I stay with them and wait for the opportunity to drive him into a corner or soften up and start listening. You don't want a loose horse or him to put a foot through the reins.
     
    12-17-2009, 01:21 AM
  #9
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Honeysuga    
If he is bracing his neck at with the one rein stop and not stopping, you are doing it wrong. It is not just crank his head to the side and hope he stops, he will either do exactly as he is and resist, or keep going and possibly fall and hurt or kill you both.

What he should be doing is moving his hind end away form your leg as you bend his neck, this causes him to mentally change gears from "go" to "turn", and in effect he will slow down and stop.
I was going to write this but I just felt plumb lazy. Also you missed an opportunity to teach him an important lesson...You can ride as fast as he can run. If you were in an arena you should have taken a deep seat and stayed with him. The worse thing that would have happened is you would have fallen off and you did that anyway. Probably he would have ran to the gate and stopped then you could have picked up the reins and proceeded to school him.
     
    12-17-2009, 01:23 AM
  #10
Banned
To MBP-yes, that's exactly what needs to happen, lol.....he also needs to "go ridden out of him, and I do not have the velcro butt nor the real solid skills to do so, should he decide he wants to be a nut. That's where my trainer comes in. I'll feel better knowing he's still only a five minute drive away from me and I can watch the sessions if I choose, but its not so much as having the brakes installed as giving them a tune up. Until last month when he took off on me, I could trot him on a loose rein and he'd never even think of going faster.

HS-You're right, its not a "yay, canter" its a "oh, I remember how this goes--I take off and its way more fun!" Again, he never had a problem with his brakes or his cues until he took off on me last month. That's when he figured out he could go, and basically get away with it. In this case the cantering him in to the ground will get him to really LISTEN to my cues again--sometimes but not always he ignores the "slow down" cue in the round pen, so I guess its time he learned? As for the one rein stop, he bends fine from the ground and in the saddle. I've one rein stopped him before, the last time he took off on me, but that was a little more controlled than this time. At a walk, he yields his hind end into a turn and if I chose to he could put his nose on my foot. But when he gets his "race horse" brain, he forgets all of that and just knows how to charge forward with his front end and keep going.

Marissa-It wasn't a choice, as soon as he took off I lost my reins. They're thick trail reins and are kind of soft, so they just fell from my hand and that was it. If I'd kept them, I probably would have stayed on and gotten him under control, but at that point I knew it just wasn't going to happen so I rolled off. I've actually fallen once before and forgot to roll, which resulted in me breaking my wrist. So I did teach myself for future purposes, lol. He wasn't galloping, he was cantering, but it was his long and choppy race track canter so he was moving pretty fast. Like I said with my boy puck, I don't have the real solid skills or the velcro butt to sit his new found racetrack fits. Maybe after a few sessions with the girl who used to ride broncos he'll get it, but until then I don't plan on getting on him.

Health wise, I am fine, no concussion, but he did manage to clip me with his back legs (he has stiff stifles!) as he jumped over me, so I have a nice bruise on my thigh. My tailbone is also bruised pretty good, so I wouldn't be in riding condition regardless.
     

Quick Reply
Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Wow - you can't beat that. themacpack Horse Talk 9 07-21-2009 05:25 PM
I could just BEAT my neighbor!! KTSpeedhorse Horse Health 111 06-08-2009 04:18 PM
I beat horses lol kershkova Horse Riding 4 03-25-2009 09:48 PM
1/2 a beat off Kirsti Arndt English Riding 7 08-06-2008 01:29 PM
SHOWJUMPERS BEAT THIS!! Eventer Gal Horse Pictures 17 08-05-2007 08:35 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:20 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0