Is he trainable?!
   

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Is he trainable?!

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  • Name piks
  • Tendon boots or not? harden legs without?

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    08-18-2012, 01:24 AM
  #1
Banned
Is he trainable?!

Ok so Im getting a 7 y.o. 16.1hh TB gelding this Oct.. He is a western horse. He was cowboy shot off of and he has the speed for cross-country and I was wondering if you guys might think he's trainable for eventing. And also, when he was 2 y.o., he hit a metal pole, and it went into his leg, but the vet said that his leg would be okay to jump on only if I had polo wraps or splint boots, witch I would xD. Buttt yeahh :P here are some piks. I have free jumped him, but small :)
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    08-18-2012, 07:35 AM
  #2
Foal
Cute horse!

What exactly was the damage done to the leg? Why did the vet suggest wraps/boots for jumping - to offer support? If so, I would be skeptical and get a medical done on him (scans of the leg, lameness/gait analysis exam) to see how it healed.

Fingers crossed it's smooth sailing for you :)
     
    08-18-2012, 07:37 AM
  #3
Weanling
Do you mean backing him or schooling him up, or just getting him used to cross country?

If its (re?)backing him, age shouldn't really be a problem - Alli was 6 when she was started. I will say make sure there is some one around and helping you who has experience with backing horses.
Same with reschooling- horses should have their schooling 'topped up' many times in their life, and should be kept on the straight and narrow throught their work always.

Training for cross country is all about getting the horse's stamina up to scratch and lots of desensitisation to spooky looking jumps. You also have to maintain the idea of ALWAYS picking up his feet clear of the jumps as obviously cross country jumps are rather solid! I would advise the help of a professional instructor at least at first to perfect your and the horses jumping technique.

With the horses leg not being perfectly sound, I would be wary of cross country as the dicipline is very strenuous on their legs. The tendon temperatures rocket, especially with boots (you can get boots with 'cooling systems' but they are often either expensive or ineffective) when a horse gallops for long periods of time which can lead to the tendon fibres snapping, jumps arent on flat ground- lots of drops and down hill sections on uneven grass, and the fittening up of eventers often includes long slow gallops which strain and stress the legs.There is also the jumping and dressage aspects to consider. These diciplines can put a lot of strain on the legs too, especially at higher levels. Many eventing horses go lame unfortunatly :/

Eventing isn't a complete no-no, but it isn't a low impact dicipline. Tendon boots and splint boots will protect the legs to a certain extent but it will be difficult to progress far up the levels if that is what you aim to do.

Be careful, build his fitness gradually (literally start just doing hacks on the roads at walk for half an hour to harden his legs before you start jumping) never overjump him or tackle a new type of jump before he is ready and always be aware of how he is feeling to ride. If he starts to feel even slighlty lame on that foot, get off and go easy, better to be safe than sorry!

Congrats on getting a new horse btw! He looks adorable :) whats his name? More pics?!?
     
    08-18-2012, 07:43 AM
  #4
Super Moderator
Why couldn't you retrain him? What did Cowboy mounted shooting do to him that was so bad. Like any timed or speed even horse, CMS horses can be well trained and can be blown up idiots. How does he ride? What does he do?

If someone trained the horse for shooting that did not do it right and did not do enough slow work, XC and jumping are not going to be the challenge, Dressage will.

It is always faster and easier to not have 'baggage' and to start with a clean slate. Only you can decide if you want to invest the time and money to retrain one. It is cheaper, easier and less questionable to start with a clean slate or at least an unsoiled horse. I used to do it, but now I would not bother at all.

I would worry a WHOLE LOT MORE about previous leg issues.
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    08-18-2012, 07:55 AM
  #5
Yearling
I would question the statement that the wraps can support the leg. If he is jumped without the legs he will break down but if he is jumped in the wraps he will be fine? I would want more explanation on that idea. I would get x-rays and an ultrasound of that leg in question. If it was soft tissue damage then yeah he would be just as sound as any other evener. If it was bone or ligament damage then all bets are off.

With time, and training I am sure you can rework him into eventing. I would be more concerned about the leg.
     
    08-18-2012, 09:58 PM
  #6
Banned
Thanks! And it healed fine the vet said, but it has little splints all over.
     
    08-18-2012, 10:05 PM
  #7
Showing
It was my understanding that splints indicate bone weakness. When my son developed a large one above his ankle the doc told me the bone could break by merely walking down stairs. Surgery was involved which won't happen with the horse.
     
    08-18-2012, 10:07 PM
  #8
Banned
Thanks for all the info! It rly helped!!!!!! I know that XC is dangerous, but I would do SOOOO many things to make sure his leg is okay. The vet suggested surgery, Its a $90,000 surgery thought. But we are very ''rich'' for say with our training barn and lessons my dad and mother do. I hate to brag, but im trying not to.. xD.
I would teach him probably teach him dressage first (im 17 and I know A LOT about horses :P) then show jumping, and we teach eventing in our lessons so we have a XC course xD but, we have smaller xc jumps for our kid tht are learning, and I would get him used to that first. But yeahh...xD
     
    08-18-2012, 10:12 PM
  #9
Super Moderator
If money is not a factor, spend it on a better prospect. The initial cost is the smallest expense you will have going forward. There is no reason to skimp there if you don't have to. Why would you want to start with a questionable prospect?
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    08-18-2012, 10:17 PM
  #10
Foal
I agree, if money isn't an issue I would look for a completely sound horse at least started in xc or jumping. And you will have a lot of nice prospects too. A horse with any leg issue or injury will not last long xc or jumping.
     

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