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Head Strong Horse

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    03-10-2008, 10:41 PM
  #1
Foal
Head Strong Horse

Ok, so tonight I was working my horse around some barrels, not actually running the barrels, just trotting for bending purposes. He did good the first 3-4 times in each direction at the walk, but then started to act up by trying to go away from the way I was directing him at the trot. To explain it a little better, if I was riding around the arena in the clockwise direction we would approach the barrel from the right to circle it and instead of him going around it, he would practically pull the reins from my hands to double back to go the way we came. He was very determined to get his way. Of course I circled him back around and made him go around the barrel, but by this point, he was at a walk again. The only way I know how to correct him is to make him go in the direction I asked him to go. He tried the same thing with my niece and even got a little peaved and started to thrash his tail and really tried to fight with her so I am thinking that my making him go back in the same direction I had originally asked him to go did not correct the problem. What do you guys think I should do to correct him from acting this way. He does this alot in other situations as well, so I know it had nothing to do with his tack, he just wants to be difiant. He is the alpha horse and I wonder if that is why. Any suggestions? Thanks for reading all!
     
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    03-10-2008, 10:51 PM
  #2
Started
Try it without barrels, do circles in that direction until your dizzy. Almost like a pivot. And if he resists you obviously aren't kicking or pulling hard enough in the drill I just described.
     
    03-10-2008, 10:55 PM
  #3
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harlee rides horses
if he resists you obviously aren't kicking or pulling hard enough
Pulling harder isn't the answer. Is your horse bulging his shoulder out when you try to turn him? Make sure you're riding from your seat and legs rather than hands. Block his shouder on the outside so he doesn't run through your aids.
     
    03-10-2008, 10:59 PM
  #4
Started
No, I'm saying for tight little circles, also I worded that wrong I meant like applying pressure with your outside foot.
     
    03-10-2008, 11:03 PM
  #5
Started
I don't agree with working in small circles that could cause my horse discomfort, bad balance, or misbehavior. Lol
     
    03-11-2008, 12:14 AM
  #6
Weanling
LOOK where you want to go. It's so simple, but a lot of people can forget about it.
Massage the reins -- don't pull, and when massaging, do it with one hand. Remember, one hand is stronger then two. Use your legs.
Like JDI said, he could be dropping out his shoulder, so keep that in mind.
     
    03-11-2008, 03:52 AM
  #7
Yearling
Quote:
LOOK where you want to go. It's so simple, but a lot of people can forget about it.
Massage the reins -- don't pull, and when massaging, do it with one hand. Remember, one hand is stronger then two. Use your legs.
Like JDI said, he could be dropping out his shoulder, so keep that in mind.
PERFECTLY said...Amen
     
    03-11-2008, 10:30 AM
  #8
Weanling
For a couple days, or however long it takes for it to go smoothly, forget the barrels. When you are riding around your arena, imagine a barrel and ride a circle around it, at the walk. Hurry his feet around the circle. Once he makes a change, release everything and let him walk straight. Then do it right away, repeating this exercise until he moves easily off your leg around those circles and stays on the circle. In between circles, it would be best not to walk straight for too long, just keep making circle after circle. But also make sure when you feel he's made an effort, to be quick to praise him but allowing him off the circle.Don't be too picky at first, if he goes, allow it and do it over. Eventually, you can work up to walking into the circle, trotting through it, and traveling straight again. Once that happens, re-approach the barrel again and do the same exercize. Start slow, though, and accept little offers he makes to please you. It sounds like he gets a bit stuck and doesnt fully understand the point of going around the barrel, so take a few steps backwards and re-establish his ability to hurry his feet around tighter circles.
Hope that made some sense, and good luck! Let us know it is goes!
     
    03-11-2008, 01:58 PM
  #9
Foal
Hi all! Thanks for the advice, I do aprreciate it. The only thing I do want to add, is that it is not that he is not used to going around barrels, we have done it before and he seems to like when we do. However, if he doesn't want to do it, he will fight me to get his way. Sometimes he even does this when we don't use barrels. For instance, last night when we were going around the arena, he would turn his head toward the outside wall, and push his shoulder and neck towards the center of the arena. I don't think it is really and aid thing as much as a getting away with it type of thing. I am sure you all have been on a horse that ries to test your abilities. The problem with correcting this horse in a harsh way, and what I mean by that is kicking him, is that when I bought him he was green; and that was 2 years ago. Before I sent him away for 2 months training, I saw him get out of control when he was corrected for doing something wrong. I want to be able to correct him from doing things wrong that are going to be safe for me, but strong enough for him to learn. My niece was saying her trainer faces the horse to the wall and tells them to kick them. I am not to sure this is a safe thing to do with this horse and I don't want him abused. I honestly think he would rear or buck in a situation like that. Let me know what you guys think. Sorry the post was so long everyone.
     

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