Head up too high....how to correct? - Page 3
 
 

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Head up too high....how to correct?

This is a discussion on Head up too high....how to correct? within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

     
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        10-16-2008, 09:50 PM
      #21
    Yearling
    Simple answer...

    Sonny is unbalanced and has no devolped back muscels to round, the easier way is for him to put his head up - causing him to hollow out, resulting in his head up in the air.
    Lunging work should improve, and help him build those muscels up.
         
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        10-16-2008, 10:01 PM
      #22
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Delregans Way    
    Simple answer...

    Sonny is unbalanced and has no devolped back muscels to round, the easier way is for him to put his head up - causing him to hollow out, resulting in his head up in the air.
    Lunging work should improve, and help him build those muscels up.
    just wanted to point out that this is a fairly old post and I have solved the problem...it was me being off balance and not riding with him.
    Also, I'm anti-lunging so I will not lunge my horse


    Mainly what I found out was that I was restricting his movements causing him discomfort, though I was moving "with" him, I was not moving enough.
    Here's some updated videos:
    YouTube - Bareback and bridleless 1 (trot)
    YouTube - Bareback and bridleless 2 (canter)

    These both were taken a while ago, and he's improved alot. I'm was not looking for him to collect or whatnot, just drop his head a bit...and he did
         
        10-17-2008, 01:51 AM
      #23
    Foal
    Can I ask why you are anti-lunge?
         
        10-17-2008, 11:06 AM
      #24
    Super Moderator
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by dustytrailzz    
    Can I ask why you are anti-lunge?

    Cus she's a PARELLI FREAK!!!! (I'm just teasing...)
         
        11-04-2008, 06:42 PM
      #25
    Foal
    Hey there Sonny how is everything going?

    I know you basically only ride bareback now, and you SAY the Sonny seems to enjoy it. But I've just found some information that proves my theory and was hoping I could help you save your horses back! Did you know that the seat bones of yourself dig into the hroses back when you ride bareback?

    "Since a horse has much less motivation, and a much shorter attention span than his rider, discomfort is totally counter-productive to correct work. One way of creating discomfort is by pointing two fairly narrow seatbones into the latissimus dorsi muscle of the horse, and weighing it down with the weight of a human. A saddle will more or less efficiently spread the rider's weight across a much larger area of the back of the horse. And which would you prefer, had you to choose between a rock and a hard place; to be stepped on the foot with a sneaker or a high heel?" -Theresa Sandin
         
        11-04-2008, 10:03 PM
      #26
    Banned
    We are doing good....no problems other than Sonny is high on energy because I haven't been able to ride him as much.

    Jeddah, riding bareback does not hurt the horse's back...I think I have enough fat in my butt to give it a nice cushion The only thing that will cause soreness is if you are bouncing when trotting, etc....but not if you are riding quitely on their back


    Haha FP lol

    Dusty, I just think that it works the horse up more and get's them emotionally crazy. That's just my view on it...and it's been that way for a long time even before I liked Parelli....but it's just my opinion. Also Sonny gets bored easy...so to me it would be very boring and he'd hate it...
         
        11-06-2008, 04:21 PM
      #27
    Zab
    Yearling
    Lunging also wears a lot on the horses legs. ;) At least normal lunging, and loose lunging in the round pen.

    I saw you've already figured it ot, buut after reading the thread I want to give my advice anyway xD

    Ride more in walk, work on the collection, shoulder in/out etc and build his muscles more before youtry to collect in trot. He is/was not strong enough.
    If he seeks the bit, a curb can help (working with you givingthe rein after taking a little, making him following it) but tat won't work if he's not strong enough, then it'd only result in a curled up horse.
    And you were probably a bit unbalanced :P
         
        11-06-2008, 05:02 PM
      #28
    Super Moderator
    Well sonny... I think the problem is... well... he just isnt' happy with you... nope... time to get rid of him... I'll take him off your hands... You can start with a new project... yeah, that will solve it all...

    GIVE ME THE HORSE!
         
        11-06-2008, 05:24 PM
      #29
    Yearling
    I'll be honest I didn't read all the posts...but when I hear about the wester horses with head set issues I think one thing. Stop focusing on the head and think about the butt. If the horse is driving from his rear he will naturally arch his back and lower his head.
         
        11-06-2008, 08:10 PM
      #30
    Banned
    I wasn't looking for him to collect or be on the bit...I was mainly looking for him to lower his neck so it's not up high....so his poll and withers were on the same level.

    FP, you know, you could easily solve the problem and move to NY and board where I board MY horse....then you would defiantely have my permission to ride him whenever
         

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