Headshy bridling
 
 

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Headshy bridling

This is a discussion on Headshy bridling within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

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        10-26-2012, 07:46 PM
      #1
    Foal
    Headshy bridling

    My horse Reno is horribly headshy. I got him when I was six at a auction, he was 4. Now I'm twelve he's 10, and we've come a long way. He's 15 hands + and famous for bucking. When we got him the lady told us that he was tied between 2 studs and they each grabbed a ear and bit down. Now it's VERY difficult to bridle. We stuck him out in a feild with cattle for 4 years and he was all cattle mindef and lived like them. His feet wenrt done unless he came to the waterer and we cornered him. Now he will throw a buck or a rear in to make sure you are paying attention. To bridle: 1st I have to lengthen it from the 4 hole to the 1st then get the bit in his mouth while he throws head up or against his chest 2nd I have to go to the other side and take the brow band and separate it from the throat latch and the poll band 3rd I have to quickly flip it over his ear and put the straps together 4th I have to go to the left side again and ocaisonaly take that side apart but usually just quickly slip his ear under. I can only do this in the barn and no one can be in there. Please help!!!
         
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        10-27-2012, 08:41 PM
      #2
    Trained
    Hi Farmer,

    Quote:
    He's 15 hands + and famous for bucking.
    First & foremost, personally I would seriously advise you to find a very experienced home for him & find yourself a well trained(& more appropriately sized) horse. If you can't/won't do that, I advise you find a very good, considerate trainer to take him & get him over his hangups & give him some good training.... & you some lessons, before you get yourself seriously hurt... & probably earn him a bullet if that happens. I know that's not what you want to hear, but you're young & inexperienced & he sounds like a very difficult horse, the situation a bad 'accident' waiting to happen.

    Quote:
    Now it's VERY difficult to bridle.
    I suspect there is probably more to the story than 'the lady' told you about the reason for his headshyness. Sold at auction when he was 4yo, I also imagine he probably had little good training before you got him too. What have you done to help him feel comfortable with hands & stuff around his head/ears? What have you done to prepare him for bridling & other stuff generally. I'd forget all about bridling him until you get him over his fears & teach him some good basic 'manners' for starters.

    Quote:
    We stuck him out in a feild with cattle for 4 years and he was all cattle mindef and lived like them. His feet wenrt done unless he came to the waterer and we cornered him.
    Why did you do that? Why wasn't he cared for adequately? What has been done with/to him since he's been 'unstuck'?
         
        10-27-2012, 09:04 PM
      #3
    Yearling
    I wholeheartedly agree with loosie. I don't think this is the right horse for you. Green + Green = Black and Blue. At least get the help of an experienced person before you or your horse get hurt.
         
        10-27-2012, 09:04 PM
      #4
    Foal
    My horse gets sassy if I don't work her for a few days. I can't imagine what 4 years of being stuck in a field with already poor manners looks like today.

    I am inclined to suggest a trainer for restarting. Bridling isn't the biggest problem here. I would also make sure his teeth have been floated recently before you even bother with trying to bridle him. Just my input, but no solutions to offer. Subscribing to see what other people recommend. :)

    Good luck!
         
        10-28-2012, 06:27 PM
      #5
    Foal
    Thank you all!! We have got some one to come and help him. We are also getting some one to float his teeth. My dad is tall (6feet) and is bridling him for me, and once he's bridled and saddled, he is fine to ride. I have. Been bucked off a few times and my dad tells me to get back on because if he thinks you will stop riding him if he bucks, he will keep doing it. My dads been watching and helping if things get out of control. I've been gently rubbing his neck and working up to his ears. Thanks for all the replies but the selling/bullet isn't going to happen sorry:/
         
        10-28-2012, 07:08 PM
      #6
    Weanling
    I made a couple short videos to help folks with the trouble you're having. Maybe they would help you. One has to do with curing head-shyness and the other is about how to bridle a horse. Here are the links, if you are interested in viewing them.


    I'm no expert, but I've had plenty of experience. Hope it helps.
         
        10-28-2012, 08:16 PM
      #7
    Foal
    Thank you thenrie!!! I'm going to do that but I'm just going to video how I bridle to see if you have any pointers!!
         
        10-29-2012, 09:58 PM
      #8
    Trained
    Quote:
    Thanks for all the replies but the selling/bullet isn't going to happen sorry:/
    No need to be sorry - I hope - just stay safe! I don't like to sound so negative, just that this sounds like a very unsafe situation. I hope this person that's coming to help the horse is also going to help you & your dad too, to learn how to deal with him effectively *& safely*.

    I know it's a common practice, but your dad obviously doesn't get how dangerous it is to put a child(rather than an experienced bronc rider who knows & accepts the risks) on a horse that's *likely* to buck, let alone one that's known for it! And no, just putting you back on, with no thought for the reason for the behaviour, doesn't tend to be effective training either. The horse has already been instantly reinforced for his behaviour, by getting rid of you, so the more you do it, the more 'practice' he's getting at it working for him. If you're going to tackle the problem head-on(which I don't advise) by the horse being ridden before he's ready, you'd better all but guarrantee you can ride out those bucks & not come off.

    The better, safer way to do it is to train the horse in such a manner that bucking, being headshy, etc, etc is not all that likely for a start. It sounds like the horse hasn't had strong foundations 'built' to be even ready for saddling, let alone having a child aboard. As the horse already has experience with the effectiveness of bucking, I'd ensure whoever was going to train him for you was aware of this, experienced & willing to 'ride out the bucks' should the need arise.
         
        10-29-2012, 11:10 PM
      #9
    Started
    Thenrie That's the exact way Clinton Anderson does it... or I believe its him. (correct me if im wrong)

    Anyway farmermorgan- the point he gets to, is to not make it worth it for the horse to throw his head because your hand is already gone.
         
        10-30-2012, 12:30 PM
      #10
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by loosie    
    No need to be sorry - I hope - just stay safe! I don't like to sound so negative, just that this sounds like a very unsafe situation. I hope this person that's coming to help the horse is also going to help you & your dad too, to learn how to deal with him effectively *& safely*.

    I know it's a common practice, but your dad obviously doesn't get how dangerous it is to put a child(rather than an experienced bronc rider who knows & accepts the risks) on a horse that's *likely* to buck, let alone one that's known for it! And no, just putting you back on, with no thought for the reason for the behaviour, doesn't tend to be effective training either. The horse has already been instantly reinforced for his behaviour, by getting rid of you, so the more you do it, the more 'practice' he's getting at it working for him. If you're going to tackle the problem head-on(which I don't advise) by the horse being ridden before he's ready, you'd better all but guarrantee you can ride out those bucks & not come off.

    The better, safer way to do it is to train the horse in such a manner that bucking, being headshy, etc, etc is not all that likely for a start. It sounds like the horse hasn't had strong foundations 'built' to be even ready for saddling, let alone having a child aboard. As the horse already has experience with the effectiveness of bucking, I'd ensure whoever was going to train him for you was aware of this, experienced & willing to 'ride out the bucks' should the need arise.
    This may just be the difference in a man's perspective of the world and a woman's, but I have to say I don't see getting bucked off as all that dangerous. Rather, I find that folks who haven't been bucked off a time or two to get rather shaken the first time it happens and often become afraid of the horse. I agree that it is best to train a horse such that he never gives it a try, but some horses just enjoy a good buck occasionally and they grow out of it with time, just like teenagers grow into adults - most of the time. I admit that getting bucked off in my fifties is a bit different than it was when I was twelve, but it still does not worry me too much. I just have more incentive to ride it out now, rather than unload!

    One of my fondest memories was when I was nine years old and we had a Welsh/Arab pony, about 12.5 hands or so, that would not ride double. Dad put us in an arena with a sand floor and put my 7 year-old brother in the saddle. I would mount on back and see how long I could hang on. We tried to break that pony to ride double, but never succeeded. I can't tell you how fun that was. I can still see my Dad heehawing on the fence as I went head-over-heels off her rump time after time. Of course, there was my mom cursing my dad all the while as well, but she still let us do it, and I thank her for that. I and all my younger siblings learned to ride on that pony. We all shed many tears when she died years later of colic.

    So, I have to think that FarmerMorgan's dad knows full well the dangers of letting a kid ride a horse that bucks. Likely he has more experience with that than either of us. He's probably also aware of the problems that come from over-protecting kids and not letting experience be the teacher.

    Keep after it FarmerMorgan. Learn how to train a horse out of bad habits. Learn from experience (both your own and from others) and don't be afraid to "get back on" every time.
         

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