Help agressive horse please respond - Page 3
   

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Horse Training

Help agressive horse please respond

This is a discussion on Help agressive horse please respond within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • When trying to move the horse out while lunging when i hit his neck with the lunge line he turns around and tries to bite at me
  • How does free lunging help aggressive horse

Like Tree25Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    07-13-2012, 03:23 AM
  #21
Foal
- when he kicks out when I hit him or tries to bite do I just hit him again ? And he'll eventually quit.?
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    07-13-2012, 03:26 AM
  #22
Foal
Gremmy - they are nervous about it . But he never really kicks me per say , it was only today when I was putting on his back splint boot , he side kicked a little and got me in the knee. He is normally really kind , espically when we ride . He's like a whole different horse when he are riding like I know he will take care of me .. its only when you touch him he gets angrey. He has never atcually BIT me , because I always catch him in time, but he has pinned his ears back and tried many times.
     
    07-13-2012, 03:34 AM
  #23
Showing
I still feel that you should save up for horse handling lessons. I have a feeling that you aren't a leader in his eyes via how you've been correcting him and brushing off his pushy testing behaviors so over time he's tested you more without you realizing (which is fine, it takes time to really understand their behavior.)
     
    07-13-2012, 03:36 AM
  #24
Foal
So what can I do to fix it now - besides get a new trainer . That isn't in the cards right now.
     
    07-13-2012, 05:47 AM
  #25
Foal
You should coax him into it instead of going straight up to him. Offer him treats and slowly get closer as he takes them. Don't go straight for the face, aim for scratching the neck or withers. Also some exercises to build trust is lunge him on a lunge line and before you switch sides or finish, make him come to you. You can do this by lightly pulling on the line to make him come, then make him follow you. Once you have this down, try free lunging. This is no lunge line. Make him come to you. Don't give up until he does and don't give in and go to him. It is frustrating and may take up to an hour or more but don't GIVE UP once you start. It will pay off I promise, I had to do this with an abused horse at the stable where I train. And when you do get to pet him give him treats as a reward for letting you.

This is pretty advanced ground work that shows dominance, and I don't know if you're up for it, find someone to help you, but in the end the horse must know you're boss
     
    07-13-2012, 05:55 AM
  #26
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by redclaybear    
You should coax him into it instead of going straight up to him. Offer him treats and slowly get closer as he takes them. Don't go straight for the face, aim for scratching the neck or withers. Also some exercises to build trust is lunge him on a lunge line and before you switch sides or finish, make him come to you. You can do this by lightly pulling on the line to make him come, then make him follow you. Once you have this down, try free lunging. This is no lunge line. Make him come to you. Don't give up until he does and don't give in and go to him. It is frustrating and may take up to an hour or more but don't GIVE UP once you start. It will pay off I promise, I had to do this with an abused horse at the stable where I train. And when you do get to pet him give him treats as a reward for letting you.

This is pretty advanced ground work that shows dominance, and I don't know if you're up for it, find someone to help you, but in the end the horse must know you're boss
I wouldn't be giving treats at all if he's biting and kicking. I'd be getting a trainer in to show the OP how to move his feet in a safe manner. This isn't an abused horse, it's a horse that's learned there aren't any leaders around so has taken it upon himself. Inviting him to take treats is just asking for trouble IMHO.
Posted via Mobile Device
     
    07-13-2012, 05:56 AM
  #27
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by redclaybear    
You should coax him into it instead of going straight up to him. Offer him treats and slowly get closer as he takes them. Don't go straight for the face, aim for scratching the neck or withers. Also some exercises to build trust is lunge him on a lunge line and before you switch sides or finish, make him come to you. You can do this by lightly pulling on the line to make him come, then make him follow you. Once you have this down, try free lunging. This is no lunge line. Make him come to you. Don't give up until he does and don't give in and go to him. It is frustrating and may take up to an hour or more but don't GIVE UP once you start. It will pay off I promise, I had to do this with an abused horse at the stable where I train. And when you do get to pet him give him treats as a reward for letting you.

This is pretty advanced ground work that shows dominance, and I don't know if you're up for it, find someone to help you, but in the end the horse must know you're boss
Oh my word.. I have no idea if I agree with any of this with a horse that is already acting pushy and NOT frightened. Pushy =/= give treats or free lunge. That is giving you doormat status instead of leader status.

If I did that with my pushy horse, he'd get WORSE not better.

This isn't an abused horse, and this isn't a frightened horse. This is a horse that wants someone to look up to to PROTECT them from predators (aka a herd leader)

You shouldn't even do this with an abused horse. Free lunging is not safe when you haven't established trust and respect. You're asking to be attacked and for them to feel like they are trapped and are unsafe.

~~~

OP please don't do the above. That's going to make things worse.

You must think like a horse. Horses don't go around giving each other treats and go up to a random horse without laying down the ground rules and sticking up for themselves. That would get them seriously beat up (think lowest horse in the pecking order)

You need to have space. If this horse pushes into your space, you push him out. If he kicks out at you, you take a crop and get after him for it like you mean it.

What he wants to know is if HE were a predator, would you stick up and protect him from it or would you curl up into a ball and run away screaming and let them eat you? He's hoping for the first option as that is going to keep him alive. And that would be in his best interest to follow that leader.

So you need your space. Once you have your space, then on YOUR terms you can allow them into your space, as they can allow you into their space (and they will once you show you're a leader)

And I don't mean smacking the horse every time he blinks. That doesn't TEACH him anything. Teach him you need space, he stays out. Teach him he is NOT allowed to bite or kick out at you. Praise him when he does something REALLY good, otherwise leave him alone. Give him scratches behind his ears and on his neck every now and then.

You are a leader, you are a teacher (not a trainer..) and you need to let him know you can step up and protect him by correcting his naughty behavior and enforcing his good behavior.

Does that help?
Army wife likes this.
     
    07-13-2012, 05:59 AM
  #28
Showing
And to clarify, my horse was the "abused" horse. He was frightened but I NEVER EVER EVER EVER bribed him. EVER. Treats are earned. Treats are earned never given. Treats are earned by doing amazing things. Treats are earned by doing amazing things like ground tying for a long time by his OWN choice. Treats are earned by doing amazing things like getting into the canter without bucking.. AND being on the correct lead.

Are you getting the message? Treats are EARNED. Clicker training is teaching the horse to work to EARN the treat.

You do not give a horse treats for being adorable. No.

Treats do not build trust. ACTIONS build trust.

Furthermore free lunging is an artform. It is difficult. It is the highest form of communication in an enclosed area. You are vulnerable to being attacked/charged at. The horse is free to not listen to you. If you don't know what you're doing, or if you don't have a relationship.. it is dangerous.

It also can cause the horse to feel like they're in a cage with a lion and is not recommended without establishing trust first. REAL trust, not the horse just tolerating you.

~~~

A different method, which does pose some risks as well, is playing "the catching game" (I just named it something, call it whatever you want to..) You go to catch your horse in the pasture and everytime he doesn't give you his FULL attention, or tries to kick, bite, or run.. you make them run. Everytime they do something other than look at you, you make them run. You 'send' them away from you and then give them a chance to try something new. If they stop and look at you, then stop making them run and watch them for a minute. If they're okay and watching you, take a few steps forward.

If he turns to look elsewhere, make him run again! If he stands, keep approaching until you get his face in that halter. Then rub on him, love on him.

You can either take him up and work with him, or some days just play this game to catch him and then release him. And other times don't put the halter on and just love on him and then walk away.

Every time you play, and you are consistent.. he will take less effort to catch and will be focused on you more.
     
    07-13-2012, 06:04 AM
  #29
Started
Go Maggie! OP, listen to Skyseternalangel - she knows her stuff
Posted via Mobile Device
     
    07-13-2012, 06:23 AM
  #30
Trained
Op-Sky has given good advice. It is a starting point.

Please stop grooming and tacking him up in his stall. That puts you in a very limited space that would make me nervous given his antics. If you cross tie him-keep a lead on him, in case you need to correct him. Frankly, I ground tie mine so that they do not learn to break cross ties.

He may have had a PPE, but that was a month ago, and his behavior has changed. So, now it maybe time to reassess, although I think this horse has your number.....

It you smack him with a whip and he moves his butt toward you-SMACK HIM HARDER. You are not going to hurt him.

AIm for getting the help of someone who can show you how to deal with this. THis is NOT something you can do on your own. I will also say I had one, years ago, I was an adult, who happened to also be a QH gelding, same age, who get SUPER aggressive and I had to rehome him. He scared me, and once you are scared it becomes difficult to correct. That horse would attack you even if you had a whip, randomly out in the pasture. THere was no way to do the catching game" or anything else. He also was great to ride. SOmetimes we are just not the right one to handle a particular horse. It happens. Mine was rehomed to a MAN, who did beautifully with him. (PS, mine had been raised by a teenage girl, and spoiled).

Do not EVER make excuses for him. He is not turning his butt at you because he is looking at a bird. (yes, I have heard this one....) Disrespect is NEVER excusable. If he kicks, bites, etc, it is critical that you correct it immediately. Make him think he will "die" for about 3 seconds. Loudly yell, hands flailing, and smack with a whip-I have even kicked mine if he tried to kick me. Watch how other horses correct each other. You will NOT hurt him.

As a young girl-you WILL need help. Find a trainer. That is really the bottom line. Otherwise, you may very well end up hurt and rehoming him.
themacpack and Army wife like this.
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Agressive horse in round pen!! Cowgirl4HIM Horse Training 18 05-23-2012 10:25 AM
My Horse, was she playing or being agressive? sdellin Horse Talk 6 10-22-2011 01:20 AM
Agressive horse - any ways to do something? kitten_Val Horse Training 20 02-13-2009 11:26 PM
How do I get my horse to respond to my leg? xilikeggs0 Horse Training 8 01-30-2009 07:03 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:33 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0