help with getting him bridled
 
 

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help with getting him bridled

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        04-16-2011, 02:24 PM
      #1
    Foal
    help with getting him bridled

    So ever since I got my gelding he has been a total toad to bridle. He is 17hh or better and has the neck of a giraffe, and I am 5'3''. The second he sees the bridle he tightens his lips. I can get the bit in with out to much trouble but when I go to put the rest over his head he streches his neck as high up as it will go and gerks his head around. Its a 2 person job if you have someone over six feet, but even then it take 15 minutes to get on. Its only for the bridle for a halter he's is an angel. I try not to bang his teeth with the bit but when he gerks around its hard not to. I tried putting fruit rollup on the bit(the sweet tasting ones) so he would take that better, but it really hasnt helped. This is my first horse and I havent been around to many, but all the other ones that I have bridled are shorter and put their heads down to help you out. Every time I go to feed him, a couple times a day, I rub his poll and play with his ears other than that any tips on how to teach him to lower his head and be good about it would be great. Its not fun to start a ride off like that.
         
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        04-16-2011, 02:33 PM
      #2
    jdw
    Weanling
    No, its not!!! I have some of this same trouble!! Makes me so mad I want to smack mine (but of course I don't). I tie mine in the cross ties; this helps keep his head down, though he does still fuss and squirm around;using my first and index fingers I put them between his lips (at the top of his lips). Gently, but firmly, I start wedging my two fingers into his mouth (your two fingers will go between his teeth, top and bottom) to make him open. If done correctly it will force his mouth open but you have to be fast!! If you don't get the bit in quickly before he shuts his mouth, or he spits it back out somehow, just do it over again. I saw a woman at a friends barn the other night; it took her three tries but she finally got the bit in and was able to pull the rest of the bridle on up over his ears. If you need a pic let me know........
         
        04-16-2011, 02:45 PM
      #3
    Foal
    I can get the bit in, basically like you described, but the biggest issue is getting the rest of the bridle on. And as of right now I don't have cross ties, as soon as the ground thaws ill be putting some in.
         
        04-16-2011, 08:03 PM
      #4
    jdw
    Weanling
    That will help, but I do sympathyze. I just reread and ralize he is 17h~GOOD GRIEF!!!! Mine is only 15.2 so you have your hands full! If you tried stepping up on soemthing like a mounting block, that could be dangerous, I suppose. Mine does the head thing (WAY up) but he's not so tall, and thus not as big of a challenge. Let me know if you find a better answer; I could use the help too!!
         
        04-16-2011, 09:58 PM
      #5
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by specialdelivery    
    So ever since I got my gelding he has been a total toad to bridle. He is 17hh or better and has the neck of a giraffe, and I am 5'3''. The second he sees the bridle he tightens his lips. I can get the bit in with out to much trouble but when I go to put the rest over his head he streches his neck as high up as it will go and gerks his head around. Its a 2 person job if you have someone over six feet, but even then it take 15 minutes to get on. Its only for the bridle for a halter he's is an angel. I try not to bang his teeth with the bit but when he gerks around its hard not to. I tried putting fruit rollup on the bit(the sweet tasting ones) so he would take that better, but it really hasnt helped. This is my first horse and I havent been around to many, but all the other ones that I have bridled are shorter and put their heads down to help you out. Every time I go to feed him, a couple times a day, I rub his poll and play with his ears other than that any tips on how to teach him to lower his head and be good about it would be great. Its not fun to start a ride off like that.

    This may be long so bear with me.

    I worked with a 16.3 Tennessee Walker who did this sometimes. You're right, no fun!!

    Anyways, this is how I got him to put his head down.

    1. Tie him (ONLY if he's comfortable tying, which I assume he is)
    2. Put a small amount of pressure on his poll, right inbetween his ears. KEEP it there, until he puts his head down.
    NOTE: He can put his head down a foot, or a half inch, either way remove the pressure AS SOON as he gives his head down.
    3. Reward him for putting his head down with a pat or a verbal "good boy"
    4. Put pressure back on the top of his head
    5. Keep going with the process until his head is at a good height, then lots and lots of praise.

    If you do this consistently and get it to the point where putting the halter on is easy, and he puts his head down when asked, then you can get the bit in the horses mouth easily, just by putting your right arm over his poll, in between his ears, with head stall in hand. Then using your left hand, guide the bit into his mouth. Then (with your right hand still on his poll) gently guide the headstall and fit it over his ears.

    It may take some time, but it is well worth the training. You CAN stand on a mounting block, because if done correctly, the horse will never freak, but will be calm about putting his head down when asked.

    Hope that helps :)
         
        04-16-2011, 10:27 PM
      #6
    Started
    Put molasses on the bit and in a few days he'll be reaching for it.
    If you don't want the mess of molasses they also make bit wraps that are flavored (or just use a fruit rollup).

    Also make sure that there's nothing wrong with his teeth because if he needs a floating that could be part of the issue if he has mouth sores. And depending on how he is with the bit when you ride, you may want to also evaluate the bit you ride in.

    Good luck!
         
        04-17-2011, 12:34 AM
      #7
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Lakotababii    
    This may be long so bear with me.

    I worked with a 16.3 Tennessee Walker who did this sometimes. You're right, no fun!!

    Anyways, this is how I got him to put his head down.

    1. Tie him (ONLY if he's comfortable tying, which I assume he is)
    2. Put a small amount of pressure on his poll, right inbetween his ears. KEEP it there, until he puts his head down.
    NOTE: He can put his head down a foot, or a half inch, either way remove the pressure AS SOON as he gives his head down.
    3. Reward him for putting his head down with a pat or a verbal "good boy"
    4. Put pressure back on the top of his head
    5. Keep going with the process until his head is at a good height, then lots and lots of praise.

    If you do this consistently and get it to the point where putting the halter on is easy, and he puts his head down when asked, then you can get the bit in the horses mouth easily, just by putting your right arm over his poll, in between his ears, with head stall in hand. Then using your left hand, guide the bit into his mouth. Then (with your right hand still on his poll) gently guide the headstall and fit it over his ears.

    It may take some time, but it is well worth the training. You CAN stand on a mounting block, because if done correctly, the horse will never freak, but will be calm about putting his head down when asked.

    Hope that helps :)
    i think this is a fantastic idea. Seeing as he's taking the bit without a problem I don't think you need to sweeten the bit to entice him to be bridled. It sounds more like he just needs to be taught to put his head down and the above suggestions are great for that.

    I'm 5'3" and have a 17hh TB so I know what you're dealing with. I taught my horse the same way that Lakota nicely listed here and i've never had a problem with bridling since.

    Good luck!
         
        04-17-2011, 01:13 AM
      #8
    Foal
    Those are definitely great ideas, and as a newbie I need all the help I can get. I know a smaller horse would be better for a small new to horses person, but after riding many tall horses there is nothing better than being way up there. Now that it is finally above 0 up here I can really start on his training, without freezing my tush off. :)
         
        04-17-2011, 02:14 AM
      #9
    Super Moderator
    When it comes to teaching your horse to lower their head, take every opportunity to have them do this.
    For example, I know that I can easily flip my reins over Mac's head when I dismount and want to lead him, but I try to remmeber that there is an opportunity to reinforce the "lower your head please" command. So I ask him to lower it so that I can lift the reins off his neck. And viceversa.
    Look for places to do this when you are leading him or tacking or such. Once he gets it and it's no big deal, make it a daily part of riding vocabulary.

    Just like "back up please". Step away from me , please. No, stand there! Not up on top of me. Come now, and trot forward! Wait politely for this handful of hay. Step your hind end over, please.

    Do all these things every time your ride just like they are just part of your day.
    And always say "thank you" to your horse.
         
        04-17-2011, 06:38 PM
      #10
    Green Broke
    My advice is like the others. Teach him to lower his head. When you're doing this whenever you feel even the slightest change, even if you can't tell he lowered his head, but he stopped pushing on your hand then stop. Keep at it until the instant you apply light pressure on his head he'll drop his head and he'll drop it all the way to the ground if you like.

    I've spent a lot of time just getting my horse to drop his head and keep it on that ground while I hug his neck, lol (that's not a part of the training, but it makes it more fun!) Eventually your boy will be a pro at dropping his head and won't think about pushing into your pressure when you push his head down. Then when you bridle him, keep his head so low that you could bridle him from your knees.

    This has worked great for me and is really convenient! My horse always sticks his nose in the ground when he knows it's time to be bridled!
         

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