Help With Horse Trailering
 
 

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Help With Horse Trailering

This is a discussion on Help With Horse Trailering within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • What to do when a horse rears on trailering

 
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    02-20-2009, 02:12 PM
  #1
Foal
Thumbs down Help With Horse Trailering

My horse has a HUGE problem with frontload trailers. She will load fine for slantloads but when it comes to front loads, she freaks and rears up really high. My friends got this really nice trailer and it's front load and we're going to shows in it and stuff so I don'y know what to do!! Any tips on getting her to actually like the trailer that is frontload? Anything would help! Thank you!
     
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    02-20-2009, 02:16 PM
  #2
Started
Some horses do prefer slant loads to straight loads for comfort reasons. But IMO this is not about the trailer. This is about her confidence. She is unconfident, for whatever reason, about it so you need to help her gain confidence. I'd suggest going on Ebay and finding Parelli's trailer loading DVD. That should help you out a lot.
     
    02-20-2009, 02:24 PM
  #3
Trained
Can you have your friend leave the trailer at your place for a while? I think it's just about getting her comfortable with a different style. Practice and praise will help. She just needs to get used to it.
     
    02-20-2009, 03:02 PM
  #4
mls
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by equestrian_rider465    
My horse has a HUGE problem with frontload trailers. She will load fine for slantloads but when it comes to front loads, she freaks and rears up really high. My friends got this really nice trailer and it's front load and we're going to shows in it and stuff so I don'y know what to do!! Any tips on getting her to actually like the trailer that is frontload? Anything would help! Thank you!
How big is your horse? How big is the trailer? A lot of the standard two horse straight loads are narrow, short walled and short in height.

Please know that not every horse responds to 'cookie cutter' training methods. I like to think of horses as intelligent creatures that can have a say in things.
     
    02-20-2009, 03:06 PM
  #5
Yearling
We often have clients that say their horse's won't load into a straight haul trailer, but they (the horse) have no issue with getting onto our 4 horse head to head with a side ramp.

We have often thought that the straight hauls must look more confining to them and we all know how claustrophobic they can be.

If you can park the trailer in a spot that is going to make good use of sun light try that. The brighter and roomier you make the trailer look the easier they go on. Also if there's an escape door open it, BUT and it's a big BUT, have someone standing by it ready to close it if she heads for it.

The height of the trailer plays an important role as well. Sometimes they will shy away from a 7 foot height trailer but have no issue with a warm blood size.

Just be patient and as Dumas said lots of praise.

FYI, we haul over a 150,000 miles in any given year and given their druthers the horse's in box stall will almost always face the back of the trailer. Facing forward or on a slant is not what they would choose to do. Slant hauls were designed with people in mind not horse's.
     
    02-20-2009, 03:11 PM
  #6
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by mls    
How big is your horse? How big is the trailer? A lot of the standard two horse straight loads are narrow, short walled and short in height.

Please know that not every horse responds to 'cookie cutter' training methods. I like to think of horses as intelligent creatures that can have a say in things.
This is very true. If it's a 2 horse straight load and it has a removeable divider, try getting her familiar with the trailer without the divider first. Once she will go in everytime, then try with the divider (be prepared, it may feel like you're starting at square one again). We have very stocky Paint mares and our 2 horse combo/stock trailer doesn't leave them a lot of wiggle room, and it did take patience and practice with the young ones.
     
    02-20-2009, 09:56 PM
  #7
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by mls    

Please know that not every horse responds to 'cookie cutter' training methods. I like to think of horses as intelligent creatures that can have a say in things.
Love that. So true.

We had some horses here awhile back that hated the front load as well. What we did for awhile, was back the trailer up to something, like the side of a barn, a hay stack, anything really. Have the back of the trailer be about 10-12 feet away, and block off one side. So basically you have a little box. Only way out is the way you came in, or into the trailer.

Any time your horse thinks about not being in the trailer, like looking away, backing up, or worse rearing, you have to do something unpleasant enough that the idea of getting into the trailer seems most pleasant. The moment she looks to the trailer, big reward.

Having the trailer backed up against something gives a sense of security and also blocks from going backwards.

Little by little you pull the trailer out each time it gets easier, and pretty soon you've weaned her from the barricade. Do not lead her away from the trailer to re-align. She will straighten herself out if she plans on getting in the trailer. If she has no intention, get loud until she searches for the right answer. It's like black and white kind of clear. Trailer=peace, outside of trailer=no peace.
Good luck!!!
     
    02-21-2009, 12:25 PM
  #8
Started
The technique koomy described might work with a horse who is confident and is just not going in the trailer, but with a horse who is truly afraid of the trailer that technique will BLOW THEM UP. Putting pressure on a horse who is afraid is not good to do at all. They will not gain more trust in you.
     
    02-21-2009, 02:11 PM
  #9
Trained
Sometimes a horse needs to get glad in the same pants it got mad in. Not all horses will like the idea of trailering but it's something that is not an option.

Go ahead and blow up...then get your horsey behind on the trailer. Next time... if you blow up...You're still going to have to get your behind on the trailer...Next time...if you blow up...You're still going to have to get your behind on the trailer....eventually....there will be no more blow ups.
     
    02-21-2009, 08:03 PM
  #10
Started
IMO it's better to help the horse gain confidence by approaching and retreating instead of telling him "It's either blow up and go to a horrible state of mind or get in the trailer." To me, that's a form of forcing the horse to do it. The horse can't possibly gain confidence in that kind of situation. Nor can he learn when he is in a fearful state of mind. He can only learn when he is confident.

It's our job to get our horses to like the trailer. They need to have a good feeling about it so that all you have to do is point to the trailer and they hop in. Any horse can learn to like the trailer, we just have to set them up for success.
     

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