Help I think my horse wears the pants
   

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Help I think my horse wears the pants

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  • My horse would not move today is he being stubborn
  • Can horse oats go bad?

 
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    05-25-2009, 03:30 PM
  #1
Foal
Help I think my horse wears the pants

Since the year has started my horse has been so stubborn, spooky and very high energy so I'm very sure I've lost my title as the leader im sure that he has no health problems had his feet don't a week ago went to the vet a couple days ago had his teeth floated no problems.... How can I get back to being alpha horse in his eyes? What are common oops the owners make that hurt their leader status? Also he's a freak If he's sees another horse/ group of horses even if he has a buddy with him. He neighs, trots around On Our last ride he was a big danger to my dad because he went right in my dads horses face and one of the horses couldve reared so I dismounted because I didn't no if I could handle the situation because it was my dads first horseback ride and he was on a newly bought horse so if something happened I would not let it go... I find I'm overthinking horses and not just enjoying riding... I would also like to no how to better handle him around horses he sees.. Please don't criticize me I no I did wrong I need to no how to wear the pants if you could help me out that would be great:)
     
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    05-25-2009, 07:07 PM
  #2
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by restless spirit    
Since the year has started my horse has been so stubborn, spooky and very high energy so I'm very sure I've lost my title as the leader im sure that he has no health problems had his feet don't a week ago went to the vet a couple days ago had his teeth floated no problems.... How can I get back to being alpha horse in his eyes? ....... Please don't criticize me I no I did wrong I need to no how to wear the pants if you could help me out that would be great:)
You may not wish to hear this but I think you and your horse need to go back to the trainer.
     
    05-26-2009, 06:41 AM
  #3
Weanling
Common oops

Letting a horse be food aggressive. I have found that most horses with behavior problems starts with the feed. Usually I find an owner that is actually scared of their own horse so when they feed and the horse acts aggressive they drop the hay and get out. This is where it all starts the horse becomes the alpha. Never never let a horse turn its butt to you wether its feeding time or just out in the pasture

Sending mixed messages
I have found a lot of newbies that will correct a bad behavoir once then they get worn out and just let the horse repeat the behavior and don't correct it. Just like dealing with children you have to be CONSISTENT

Reinforcing bad behavior
Many people unknowingly teach their horse the opposite of what they want. Remember its not cute for a horse to mouth you, run at you, crowd you etc. Every time you are with your horse even playing in the pasture you are teaching it something-----make sure its a good something

I agree with the above that it would be worth paying a trainer to come and give you and your horse a couple lessons so you can both be happy
     
    05-26-2009, 07:15 AM
  #4
Weanling
Could just be Spring Fever! Make sure he is not getting alot of grain, my horses get just a grass ration feed no grain and no alfelfa (sp?). This made a huge difference in my horses behavior. Plus I used to stall my horses over night so by day they had alot more energy. They are now on 24/7 turn out. I also feed together but in order of totem poll. The alpha horse gets his portion first and on down the line. This way no one pushes eachother. Don't feel bad about getting off of your horse that was a smart horseperson, not getting off in a bad situation would be a newbie move!!!
     
    05-26-2009, 07:59 AM
  #5
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by weefoal    
Common oops

Just like dealing with children you have to be CONSISTENT

Sadly a lot of people don't realize that, kind of off the subject but I had to say it.
     
    05-26-2009, 11:19 AM
  #6
Yearling
Bad behavior should be corrected from the ground up.

Start with basic lunging in both directions. Ask for a walk, trot, and canter. The horse will most likely NOT listen to you and be racing in circles like a mad man, spooking, bucking, etc. You MUST be constant and patient in what you are asking. Cluck, tell him 'easy', talk to him until he starts to listen. Work on getting him to slow down, calm down, and respond. Do not work him to long or to hard. A short, calm session is more likely to have an effect than a long, drawn out one.

Be big. When he invades your space or tries to run you over, put on a very angry tone and puff yourself up. Make him KNOW that you are NOT okay with what he is doing. MAKE him back up, walk towards his hindquarters and MAKE him turn away. Invading of ones space is a very, very, dangerous behavior that can get you killed if it is not swiftly corrected.

Bouncing off the walls is yet another behavior I do not tolerate.
Firstly, look at what he's getting. Is it oats or sweet feed? Corn? With some horses, this can really make them go off their rocker. I know from personal experience.
My nine year old was given an oats and sweet feed diet and he became down right uncontrollable. Some horses just to not handle the sugars well, and henceforth should be taken off grain entirely or their energy should be coming strictly from vegetable fats, not straight sugars.

Whats his medical history? Pain caused by sharp points on the teeth, or a painful bean in an uncleaned sheath and greatly add to bad behavior, causing the horse to be distracted and dangerous.

What about tack pain? Does his saddle and bridal fit right? What kind of bit are you using?

What about your experience? Rider confidence and experience pays a HUGE roll in how a horse acts, especially with a higher strung or spooky horse.
Loki is very spooky, and requires a confident rider and handler otherwise he can be dangerous. Sam on the other hand is a very calm and quiet horse, he is a great mount for children as he goes very slow and does not spook at his own shadow. If I was a inexperienced, low confidence rider, Loki could probably kill me if I tried to ride him. Since I quite bluntly, don't put up with his idiocy, I can ride him without to much danger.

He is obviously not ready to be ridden out. Work with him with becoming used to on the ground to 'scary' objects. Work him extensively in a arena or round pen. Set up barrels, poles, or even flour pots and do patterns with him. I find that patterns help a horse relax and become more responsive to the rider. Especially a green or spooky horse.

If possible, ride him in a large pasture. Ride him towards the herd, then stop him, turn him around, and walk him away. Repeat until you are nearly on the herd itself. He needs to learn that no matter what, he is going to have to answer to the person on his back, not the other pretty ponies over the hill. Repeat the go-towards-walk-away until he calmly and gently walks both towards and away from his comfort zone.

I don't suggest riding within the herd itself. There is a pecking order and like with my three boys, flattened ears, bites, and kicks are most likely to be aimed at an intruding horse.

Good luck. And remember, patience is really the key. If nothing else, I'd suggest selling him to an experienced rider and getting an old, been-there-done-that horse. Sam is one of those types, and he's helped me by leaps and bounds gain confidence and better understand horses.
     
    05-26-2009, 11:39 AM
  #7
Yearling
Agree with almost everything twogeldings says - except the oats thing.
I have fed and do feed oats to everything from mini shetlands, KWPN stallions , newmarket racehorses , welsh cobs and aged arabs and oats has no heating effect on any of them . I also stabled my horse in germany at a competition yard that had a european 3 day event champion and they also fed oats to everything . Sugar drives my mare mad - oats give her condition. Just my experiance I know others have a different point of view.
     
    05-26-2009, 03:29 PM
  #8
Foal
Thanks everyone and he was originally a good horse he was a good been there down. That kind of horse he's 12 that's why I bought him in the first place but over the winter I've done alot of things that I no now were bad especially space issues and hugging on him he only gets oats after we go for a ride and only if be was a good boy or improved.. I think I'm going to call a trainer to work with us:) thanks for your posts
     
    05-26-2009, 10:22 PM
  #9
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nutty Saddler    
agree with almost everything twogeldings says - except the oats thing.
I have fed and do feed oats to everything from mini shetlands, KWPN stallions , newmarket racehorses , welsh cobs and aged arabs and oats has no heating effect on any of them . I also stabled my horse in germany at a competition yard that had a european 3 day event champion and they also fed oats to everything . Sugar drives my mare mad - oats give her condition. Just my experiance I know others have a different point of view.
Augh your lucky. My boy has been on the same grain all his life (Strategy) and when he was on oats/sweet feed he was an absolute beast to be around. I could probably give my rescue oats and sweet feed with no behavior changes, but it's so much more convenient to buy the same grain for everyone xD
     
    05-26-2009, 10:25 PM
  #10
Green Broke
What are you feeding him?
     

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