Help with my appy.
 
 

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Help with my appy.

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  • Unmotivated horse

 
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    10-23-2007, 12:18 AM
  #1
Foal
Help with my appy.

Can someone please help? I have a three year old appy when I first tried to ride her she would not go just pin her ears and try to bite me when I would squeeze or bump her sides. I have had her in the round pen for about four weeks and she does good at everything changing direction, yeilding hindquarters,backing,ect. Without pinning ears but when im moving her foward in the round pen every time I click to start her or speed her up she will do it but still pin her ears. Now when I ride her every time I click or squeeze she still pins her ears and yesterday she got my leg its purple. Thanks for any help. Steve.
     
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    10-23-2007, 12:29 AM
  #2
Yearling
No back, teeth or any obvious pain??
     
    10-23-2007, 07:56 AM
  #3
Showing
As said, check for pain issues.

Mine did the same simply because she didn't want to work (especially when it's rather hot outside). Just keep bringing it to trot and as long as she does it and go little bit slow down back to walk again. And just keep it over and over.
     
    10-23-2007, 09:04 AM
  #4
Showing
Could this be a saddle fit issue? Try her bareback in the round pen and see if she does the same thing.
     
    10-23-2007, 10:50 PM
  #5
Foal
It should not be pain because she does it in the round pen with no saddle or bit. I thought after a while in the round pen she would stop but she didnt. Thanks Steve.
     
    10-23-2007, 10:58 PM
  #6
Foal
It should not be a pain issue because she does it in the round pen with no saddle or bit. I thought she would stop after a while in the round pen but she didnt. Thanks Steve.
     
    10-24-2007, 12:45 AM
  #7
Foal
Steve, have you got a ground person? A person who's good around horses to help you out? And do make sure the saddle fits properly. It may bother her badly when there's weight in the saddle if it fits badly. If you've ruled out all health issues, teeth, ill-fitting saddle, etc, use your ground person to lead your mare while you're on her back. She's not happy going forward with you up there, so your job is to make her happy. Sit up there doing as little as possible as your ground person leads her forward into a walk, don't squeeze or kick or cluck. Praise her, tell her what a good girl she is, and continue to do this every day you ride her. As she gets more easy going and her nipping and ear pinning goes away, that's when you very slowly ease her into doing more work.
     
    10-25-2007, 05:26 PM
  #8
Started
Here are a few quick articles that may help you. :)

Lazy

"Have you ever felt lazy? I’ll bet it was never when there was something that interested you! Horses are only lazy when they are bored, disinterested or unmotivated by being with you. Ouch!

But think about it for a moment. Even the laziest person in the world loves something! And that’s when they’re motivated to get up and do something.

Lazy horses are just unmotivated horses. In Parelli lingo, they usually are the Left Brain Introverts (Horsenality Chart) and they think humans are downright boring.

Once you know what makes this horse tick, you’ll be amazed at how motivated and un-lazy he becomes!

As your horse’s leader you need to apply a little brain power to the situation because using more physical pressure (kicking, spurs, whips) will only result in more resentment and defiance. The key to this horse is mental, not physical. Rewards for desirable behavior is IT. So if you have a rule about never giving a horse treats (cookies, scratches, rest stops) you might want to re-think that. This horse wants to know what’s in it for him!"

****************

Horse Won't Go

A common question I hear is what to do about the horse who doesn't want to go; he's dull, lazy, stubborn... and other creative words people use!

I like to examine all horse behaviors by categories. If you think of an engine having three systems; air, fuel, fire, you know that if any one of these systems is not working, the entire engine will not operate properly.

Horses also have three systems that operate in a specific order; the RESPECT system, the IMPULSION system, and the FLEXION system.

Therefore, if there's a problem in the second system, IMPULSION (won't go), look for the problem in the first system, RESPECT. I'll save FLEXION for later.


What to do?
1. Get more respect from your horse. In my Savvy System, Level 1 Partnership is all about respect and eliminating opposition reflex. By teaching the Seven Games on the ground and developing freestyle riding skills, the horse's attitude greatly improves because of the new level of communication, trust, and respect.
2. Level 2 Harmony is when impulsion is greatly improved. Harmony is about positive reflexes, both on the ground in the Seven Games and Impulsion Programs while riding

Getting the "go" right
Most people are told to kick a horse to go, which is ridiculous when you think about it from a horse's point of view. Imagine if you were kicked in the ribs on the way to the dance floor... what would your attitude be towards that dance partner? Would you even want to go?

By using four distinct phases of polite assertiveness, the horse can quickly become a willing partner; happy to take our lead to the dance floor.

Phase 1 – Smile with all your cheeks! Take a long focus, stretch your hand out in front of you with the reins, and tighten your cheeks. If the horse has not moved forward from this suggestion, continue through the phases and be ready to release as soon as there's forward movement.

Phase 2 – Squeeze with your legs, starting at the top, then all the way down to your heels (turn your toes outward to make smooth contact). This is not a strong squeeze. If you are straining or getting cramps, it's too strong! Remember, a horse can feel a fly land on him.

Phase 3 – Smooch while holding the squeeze, do not let go with your legs.

Phase 4 – Spank. Start by spanking yourself lightly slap your shoulders from side to side with the end of a rope (like the 12' Lead section of the Horseman's Reins on the Natural Hackamore).

Allow the rope to grow longer and keep up the flapping rhythm until it starts touching your horse on the sides of his hindquarters, letting it get progressively stronger if he has not responded.

The moment your horse responds, release your legs, quit spanking, and keep smiling. If he stops or slows, repeat the phases again. Always begin with Phase 1.


Common Mistakes
• Probably the most common mistake is kicking out of habit, quickly losing whatever respect you just earned, so really keep a watch out for this.

• Another mistake is to keep squeezing and/or spanking after the horse has made the effort to go forward. This feels unfair and confuses the horse because they don't know what the right behavior is.

• Be sure to put slack in the reins. It's a common habit to put contact in the reins when the horse goes forward. This is sometimes enough to confuse a horse trying to do the right thing. This is where the Level 2 Harmony Program techniques can really help.

Begin each time at Phase 1 and be prepared to go to Phase 4.
Finally, be sure there's enough 'life' in your body when you ride. Think about how fast you want your horse to go and bring up enough life in your body to stimulate that... then let the squeezing, smooching and spanking support it. Your horse will learn very quickly how to get in tune with you.

I can guarantee that just reading about this will not fix the problem. Go out and play with your horse. I'll bet you'll both find a new level of respect and communication for each other. Happy dancing!

***************

Motivating Lazy Horse

Think of things from your horse’s point of view, how does life look from his side? What’s in it for him? Is he as excited about going riding as you are? When a horse is not nervous or afraid, sometimes what emerges is a rather laid back Horsenality™, one that has decided that hanging out with his pasture mates and all the grass, is way more attractive, less stressful and fun than going riding. These horses are often called Lazy or Stubborn, but really they are just unmotivated and the normal approach of spurs and whips just makes them mad.

Rather than resort to mechanical approaches, use psychology to motivate the horse. When you know what makes your horse tick, you’ll have fantastic strategies to apply that will get him running to meet you at the gate! Find out what is important to your horse with our Horsenality DVD, and then check out the Calm Ride DVD, because there’s a lot to learn about horse psychology in there and a very informative section on how to motivate the lazy horse so you can have a calm, fun ride, without all the frustration these horses are good at causing!
     
    10-25-2007, 05:28 PM
  #9
Started
Here are a few quick articles that may help you. :)

Lazy

"Have you ever felt lazy? I’ll bet it was never when there was something that interested you! Horses are only lazy when they are bored, disinterested or unmotivated by being with you. Ouch!

But think about it for a moment. Even the laziest person in the world loves something! And that’s when they’re motivated to get up and do something.

Lazy horses are just unmotivated horses. In Parelli lingo, they usually are the Left Brain Introverts (Horsenality Chart) and they think humans are downright boring.

Once you know what makes this horse tick, you’ll be amazed at how motivated and un-lazy he becomes!

As your horse’s leader you need to apply a little brain power to the situation because using more physical pressure (kicking, spurs, whips) will only result in more resentment and defiance. The key to this horse is mental, not physical. Rewards for desirable behavior is IT. So if you have a rule about never giving a horse treats (cookies, scratches, rest stops) you might want to re-think that. This horse wants to know what’s in it for him!"

****************

Horse Won't Go

A common question I hear is what to do about the horse who doesn't want to go; he's dull, lazy, stubborn... and other creative words people use!

I like to examine all horse behaviors by categories. If you think of an engine having three systems; air, fuel, fire, you know that if any one of these systems is not working, the entire engine will not operate properly.

Horses also have three systems that operate in a specific order; the RESPECT system, the IMPULSION system, and the FLEXION system.

Therefore, if there's a problem in the second system, IMPULSION (won't go), look for the problem in the first system, RESPECT. I'll save FLEXION for later.


What to do?
1. Get more respect from your horse. In my Savvy System, Level 1 Partnership is all about respect and eliminating opposition reflex. By teaching the Seven Games on the ground and developing freestyle riding skills, the horse's attitude greatly improves because of the new level of communication, trust, and respect.
2. Level 2 Harmony is when impulsion is greatly improved. Harmony is about positive reflexes, both on the ground in the Seven Games and Impulsion Programs while riding

Getting the "go" right
Most people are told to kick a horse to go, which is ridiculous when you think about it from a horse's point of view. Imagine if you were kicked in the ribs on the way to the dance floor... what would your attitude be towards that dance partner? Would you even want to go?

By using four distinct phases of polite assertiveness, the horse can quickly become a willing partner; happy to take our lead to the dance floor.

Phase 1 – Smile with all your cheeks! Take a long focus, stretch your hand out in front of you with the reins, and tighten your cheeks. If the horse has not moved forward from this suggestion, continue through the phases and be ready to release as soon as there's forward movement.

Phase 2 – Squeeze with your legs, starting at the top, then all the way down to your heels (turn your toes outward to make smooth contact). This is not a strong squeeze. If you are straining or getting cramps, it's too strong! Remember, a horse can feel a fly land on him.

Phase 3 – Smooch while holding the squeeze, do not let go with your legs.

Phase 4 – Spank. Start by spanking yourself lightly slap your shoulders from side to side with the end of a rope (like the 12' Lead section of the Horseman's Reins on the Natural Hackamore).

Allow the rope to grow longer and keep up the flapping rhythm until it starts touching your horse on the sides of his hindquarters, letting it get progressively stronger if he has not responded.

The moment your horse responds, release your legs, quit spanking, and keep smiling. If he stops or slows, repeat the phases again. Always begin with Phase 1.


Common Mistakes
• Probably the most common mistake is kicking out of habit, quickly losing whatever respect you just earned, so really keep a watch out for this.

• Another mistake is to keep squeezing and/or spanking after the horse has made the effort to go forward. This feels unfair and confuses the horse because they don't know what the right behavior is.

• Be sure to put slack in the reins. It's a common habit to put contact in the reins when the horse goes forward. This is sometimes enough to confuse a horse trying to do the right thing. This is where the Level 2 Harmony Program techniques can really help.

Begin each time at Phase 1 and be prepared to go to Phase 4.
Finally, be sure there's enough 'life' in your body when you ride. Think about how fast you want your horse to go and bring up enough life in your body to stimulate that... then let the squeezing, smooching and spanking support it. Your horse will learn very quickly how to get in tune with you.

I can guarantee that just reading about this will not fix the problem. Go out and play with your horse. I'll bet you'll both find a new level of respect and communication for each other. Happy dancing!

***************

Motivating Lazy Horse

Think of things from your horse’s point of view, how does life look from his side? What’s in it for him? Is he as excited about going riding as you are? When a horse is not nervous or afraid, sometimes what emerges is a rather laid back Horsenality™, one that has decided that hanging out with his pasture mates and all the grass, is way more attractive, less stressful and fun than going riding. These horses are often called Lazy or Stubborn, but really they are just unmotivated and the normal approach of spurs and whips just makes them mad.

Rather than resort to mechanical approaches, use psychology to motivate the horse. When you know what makes your horse tick, you’ll have fantastic strategies to apply that will get him running to meet you at the gate! Find out what is important to your horse with our Horsenality DVD, and then check out the Calm Ride DVD, because there’s a lot to learn about horse psychology in there and a very informative section on how to motivate the lazy horse so you can have a calm, fun ride, without all the frustration these horses are good at causing!
     

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