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Help with new horse that fights me while riding

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        08-14-2013, 04:16 PM
      #11
    Super Moderator
    You also need to consider that your horse isn't so much acting up because he's naughty and fighting you but because he likely isn't used to being worked alone - a lot of horses spend their entire working life just following the horse in front and never know how to be ridden independently
    Now he's suddenly in a strange place with an owner he hasn't learnt to trust yet and being asked to do things he has no clue about and he's so stressed he's doing the only thing he can think of and that's to get back to where he feels secure - the barn and his horse friends
    It might be better for you both if you could just spend some time getting used to each other while riding out on trails with another horse and then spend just short amounts of time working him on his own in the ménage or around the outside of the barn.
    Punishing him for something he doesn't understand will only make him worse. He will resent going in the school even more as he'll associate it with something bad
    You don't say how much experience you have with problem horses but it could just be that you are in over your head here and working with a good trainer might help.
    Another thought - if you were told the horse was safe and quiet and he's turned out not to be, it might be better to speak to them and discuss exchanging him for one that really does what you want it too.
    I know it might feel like giving up but no point getting seriously hurt.
    smrobs, Corporal, Ninamebo and 1 others like this.
         
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        08-14-2013, 07:55 PM
      #12
    Trained
    How does he behave when you lead him away from the barn? If he isn't calm then, he'll only be worse when ridden away.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jaydee    
    ...Punishing him for something he doesn't understand will only make him worse...
    Love that comment. I only have 3 horses, but they (and the one I rode a fair bit before selling) all have a strong sense of fair vs unfair. The US Cavalry manual cautioned against turning punishment into "an unjust and uncalled for attack" and said

    "in exceeding this limit he provokes the horse's resentment and leaves him with the memory of an injustice...Most of the faults committed by the horse are due to his ignorance and lack of training...severity becomes an injustice...it is better not to punish at all than to punish wrongly". - From the manual cited in http://www.amazon.com/American-Military-Horsemanship-Cavalry-through/dp/1420855522/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1376524475&sr=8-1&keywords=American+Military+Horsemanship
         
        08-14-2013, 08:39 PM
      #13
    Super Moderator
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Mike Zimmerman    
    Trotting small figure eights would be a good place to start. Remember this is not a punishment, don't work him into the ground. When he feels like he would want to slow down let him, and ride away at a walk. You might only get a little way and he'd want to go back, that's ok go back and start over. Be ready to ride and take as long as it takes, a mustang can have a high level of self preservation telling him it's safer at the barn, or with the herd, so you might be at it for a while until he comes through for you. You don't have to show him who's boss, he'll respect you as a leader because you alowed him to think and choose, you showed him you're willing to stick with him and show him the better way.
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        08-14-2013, 08:41 PM
      #14
    Super Moderator
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bsms    
    How does he behave when you lead him away from the barn? If he isn't calm then, he'll only be worse when ridden away.



    Love that comment. I only have 3 horses, but they (and the one I rode a fair bit before selling) all have a strong sense of fair vs unfair. The US Cavalry manual cautioned against turning punishment into "an unjust and uncalled for attack" and said

    "in exceeding this limit he provokes the horse's resentment and leaves him with the memory of an injustice...Most of the faults committed by the horse are due to his ignorance and lack of training...severity becomes an injustice...it is better not to punish at all than to punish wrongly". - From the manual cited in American Military Horsemanship
    I can just imagine this book on your bedside table, right next to your Bible!
    Corporal, bsms, Ripplewind and 2 others like this.
         
        08-15-2013, 01:15 AM
      #15
    Banned
    Oh my! The BLM here checks on the horses, but I am in PA, so not so much of a BLM issue, here you can't adopt one unless you have a lot of experience, 6' fence etc.

    I think you need professional help, you say yourself the horse is only trotting back, and yet this is an issue. Please get some pro help.
    Corporal likes this.
         
        08-15-2013, 09:56 AM
      #16
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by pineappleash    
    I prefer to train by positive reinforcement but I am at a loss with this horse. To put it in easy terms he acts "herd bound".
    He acts "herd bound" because he is extremely herd bound- he was born and raised in the wild all with a herd of horses and they all work together as a tight knit team. Before seeing humans he had probably never been out of another horses sight, and you can't be mad at him for that now. You need to keep this in mind when you go to work with him. Until you are one hundred percent confident that he will see you as the leader of his new herd (not likely how it is now from what I've read) then you can't be surprised when he focuses all his energy on getting back to where he can see and be with other horses as that's what he knows.

    Positive reinforcement will work with him, better than any spurs or hitting will as he needs to learn things first, but please please get an experienced trainer to help you.. or a horse more your speed that will help you grow and become a better rider.. You must walk before you can run, and that is in no way a bad thing.
    Corporal likes this.
         
        08-15-2013, 02:59 PM
      #17
    Green Broke
    Yes, many of us cling to our Bibles, guns and the manual on American Military Horsemanship.
    Ripplewind and DimSum like this.
         
        08-15-2013, 03:22 PM
      #18
    Trained
    ^^ In all seriousness, there are only a handful of books I've bought in paperback, and then went back and bought a hardbound copy. For riding, there are two books I've done that with - Commonsense Horsemanship by VS Littauer (http://www.amazon.com/Commonsense-Horsemanship-Vladimir-S-Littauer/dp/0668057912/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1376594206&sr=1-1&keywords=Commonsense+Horsemanship), and American Military Horsemanship by James Ottevaere (http://www.amazon.com/American-Military-Horsemanship-Cavalry-through/dp/1420855514/ref=sr_1_1_title_2_har?ie=UTF8&qid=1376594086&sr=8-1&keywords=American+Military+Horsemanship). Add in George Morris's Hunter Seat Equitation (http://www.amazon.com/Hunter-Seat-Equitation-George-Morris/dp/0385413688/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1376594416&sr=1-1&keywords=hunter+seat+equitation+george+morris ), and you have three books a bit less influential than the Bible, but still well worth reading more than once. Probably even "nightstand" good...
    Corporal, Ripplewind and DimSum like this.
         
        08-15-2013, 04:42 PM
      #19
    Super Moderator
    Getting off topic, but "True Horsemanship through Feel" is probably my bedside horse bible.
         
        08-15-2013, 05:18 PM
      #20
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Corporal    
    Yes, many of us cling to our Bibles, guns and the manual on American Military Horsemanship.
    ...and other books...
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bsms    
    ^^ In all seriousness, there are only a handful of books I've bought in paperback, and then went back and bought a hardbound copy. For riding, there are two books I've done that with - Commonsense Horsemanship by VS Littauer (Commonsense Horsemanship: Vladimir S. Littauer: 9780668057912: Amazon.com: Books), and American Military Horsemanship by James Ottevaere (American Military Horsemanship: The Military Riding Seat of the United States Cavalry, 1792 through 1944: James A. Ottevaere: 9781420855517: Amazon.com: Books). Add in George Morris's Hunter Seat Equitation (Hunter Seat Equitation: George H. Morris: 9780385413688: Amazon.com: Books ), and you have three books a bit less influential than the Bible, but still well worth reading more than once. Probably even "nightstand" good...
    AND The United State Cavalry Manual






    ...like me, tee hee
    Ripplewind likes this.
         

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