Help for a newbie - The Horse Forum
 
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post #1 of 8 Old 07-04-2010, 02:42 PM Thread Starter
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Location: Scarborough North Yorkshire
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Help for a newbie

After many years of wanting my own horse, I finally managed to purchase three weeks ago.
I am now the proud owner of Scarlett a 14.2hh cob. However the honeymoon period is over, she has settled in well, comes to the gate when I arrive stands quietly to groom and shoe, perfect, but a different story when we try to go out.
She was sold as a ride and drive mare, I didn't drive her as I don't know how but will probably take lessons later, for now I just want to ride, she went fine when I tried her out, no problem on the road, forward going etc. When I took her out back at home she was fine, a bit spooked when a car alarm went off but thats all. Next time a different story, napping very badly, went a different way fine, but then on way back napping again and rearing. So stuck to paddock to do some schooling, again tried napping and rearing. She holds her head very high, I think from the driving so am going to try a running martingale, she is currently on a full cheek snaffle, and someone else has suggested an eggbert. I know I am going to have to go back to basic schooling, but has anyone got any suggestions along the line of tack and napping techniques? Thanks
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post #2 of 8 Old 07-04-2010, 07:38 PM
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Location: Truro, NS
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I think you mean nipping? Whenever a horse tried to nip me I'd smack them back and give them a stare down. lol Thats about all I can give you for that..

As for that, firstly I would check your tack to make sure its not hurting her, see if your saddle is pinching her, or if she has a sore around her girth area, make sure the bit is the right size and check her teeth to see if they need floating or if she has any wolf teeth annoying her, after that have a look at her feet.. most horses don't act out for no reason, unless shes had a previous rider that made her that way.
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post #3 of 8 Old 07-04-2010, 09:16 PM
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No napping is...I can't remember, but a poster was talking about it on here before..
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post #4 of 8 Old 07-05-2010, 02:46 AM Thread Starter
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Napping - refusing to go forwards walking backwards and rearing. She has just been shod so its not the shoes, everything else tack wise appears fine.
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post #5 of 8 Old 07-05-2010, 03:25 AM
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sounds a little bit like my mare when I got her, for the first 2 weeks at her new home she was absolutely perfect going out, then after that bits of naughtiness started creeping in, especially on the way home, at the time I didn't have the skills to work her through it so she got away with it a bit and got worse until I went out with my instructor one day after my riding had improved a lot and had one hell of a battle with her (for me anyway lol) and now she is much better. I think what happened is that once she was settled in she became attached to her new home and new horsey friends and became herd-bound. In addition to the battle I had with her out on the trail (making her do what I want instead of charging off home, turning in circles and halting-with pigroots and small rears from her) I also did join-up with her to bind her more to me than to her horsey friends, it worked a dream! and lots of groundwork too. then I worked her out in large paddocks and then went out on the trail again and she was soooo well behaved. I think it was the combination of join-up and improved skills in knowing when she was feeling unsure and pushing her through it (showing leadership) that helped. As well as of course general schooling.

Boxer Diligent, loyal, strong
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post #6 of 8 Old 07-07-2010, 06:21 AM
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A friend of mine bought a horse about 8mths ago. She paid a lot of money for it and when she rode it before buying it, it was that quiet she was a little worried he was going to be too quiet. He was a warmblood and she wanted to compete him at high levels. Well when she got him home he bucked, reared, shied. He did everything to test her. After 2 weeks of battles and friend becoming worried she had spent all this money on a horse that was not suitable, he became the lovely horse she bought. She has won her last 4 comps, and trail rides him all the time. Maybe your new horse is testing her boundaries, and yours.
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post #7 of 8 Old 07-07-2010, 02:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maz78 View Post
A friend of mine bought a horse about 8mths ago. She paid a lot of money for it and when she rode it before buying it, it was that quiet she was a little worried he was going to be too quiet. He was a warmblood and she wanted to compete him at high levels. Well when she got him home he bucked, reared, shied. He did everything to test her. After 2 weeks of battles and friend becoming worried she had spent all this money on a horse that was not suitable, he became the lovely horse she bought. She has won her last 4 comps, and trail rides him all the time. Maybe your new horse is testing her boundaries, and yours.
I had a mare do that to me. I rode her for the first couple of days I bought her, then one day, warming up in the arena, she suddenly pitched a bucking fit - NO WARNING AT ALL! She never even laid her ears back. Two old cowboys riding nearby thought it was hilarious, but did warn me not to come off, no matter what. I hung on to both the saddle horn and the cantle for dear life, and didn't come off. She stopped just as suddenly as she started , took a deep breath, shook herself and looked back at me as if to say "well, where do we go from here?" The old cowboys said she would never do that to me again, but she had to see for herself if I was going to stick with her or not. She never gave me any attitude after that, other than her normal stubborness, which was easily dealt with, 'cause I could out-stubborn her!

Plain Old Dee, horses Dancer and Rain

I believe in dragons, unicorns, good men and other mythical creatures!
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post #8 of 8 Old 07-07-2010, 03:24 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the posts, I have got a friend of mine to school her at the moment as she is a stronger rider than I am and if she is going to keep on rearing I am not sure I would stay on!!! The schooling is definitely improving her responses, haven't tried taking her out again yet, she has tried napping and rearing a couple of times near the gate, but I think those have been her trying it on as she has had enough.
We have put her in a Blenheim Market Harborough Martingale which feeds through the bit and clips onto the reins and that appears to be pulling her head down a bit better. Does anyone know if it would be a problem for her if she rears up and then can't get her head back too far. I don't want to frighten her.
Thanks
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