Help Please!
 
 

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Help Please!

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        03-16-2009, 09:22 PM
      #1
    Foal
    Help Please!

    I got my first horse Lucy whom I love dearly 3 months ago but (theres always a but ) she has a stopping problem, if she gets really excited then she will just charge full speed ahead and if I try to slow her down she just throws her head up in the air (she will stop but it might take lots of circles or a one rein stop) and if she does stop without the circling or the one rein stop then she does it with her head in the air...also she hates standing if I stop her she might stand still for a second but than she will just dance to the side or paw the ground she also holds her head really high after I stop her I know this is probably my fault but I don't know what to do so if anyone has any ideas or suggestions that would be most helpful oh and she has gotten slightly better since I have been riding her but not a whole lot (her last owner hadn't been able to ride her alot) and if you need more info or anything just ask and I will see if I can help you help me
         
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        03-17-2009, 01:52 AM
      #2
    Trained
    This could well be a pain issue, so eliminate that first. Back probs, saddle fit, bit, teeth, etc... Many horses also have a problem with bits in general. You can look up Dr Cook's site for more info & alternatives on that.

    Without more info on her training, experience, your training, the way you're riding, etc we can't give you much but it could be that you're being heavy on the reins, that you're not asking her with your seat, that she's never learned to relax under saddle, that she's been a 'hoon' horse before you got her... I would take everything back to the basics, develop a good relationship with her & teach/reinforce good foundation training before asking her for more.
         
        03-19-2009, 09:51 AM
      #3
    Foal
    As Loosie's said, eliminate the possibility of pain. It may be pain upfront with the bit, or pain from behind which she's trying to evade and so isn't wanting to listen to you asking her to stop. Once pain is eliminated you could take a number of approaches.. Basics as Loosie's said are excellent. :)

    One method which is often useful is reinforcing her lateral flextion so that she kinda re-relaises what pressure from the bit is telling her. HEAPS of one-rein stops are involved. First in walk then trot and canter. If she's really hard when you're trying to ask for the one rein stop, you may also need to get her really working off your leg so she gives into the pressure instead of fighting against it. You say she puts her head in the air so she's already fighting a bit, so perhaps she needs to soften through her body to be able to listen to what you're asking of her. Leg should help with this. Some people would fix your problem using the one-rein stop by applying quite a bit of force so that the horse realises instantly, and then they work back from using alot fo force to only the slightest amount of force, but as she's holding her head up in the air, I don't think using alot of force would help her. She would only be upset by it, so I'd keep things nice and quiet.

    Another method is that when she doesn't listen to you asking for her to slow down that you simply keep her in that gait if not faster so that she tires (keep her going though) and as she tires more ask again for her to slow. It may take a while, so you might have to be prepared for some long sessions, but the idea is that the horse should realise that if she doesn't listen to you asking her to slow, that she can continue as she is, but that when she wants to slow she's not allowed to. Not until you ask for it anyways. Of course when she does slow, give HEAPS of praise This method does have it's limits though. And not everybody feels confident nor has a suitable area to conduct it.

    The issues she has with standing can be solved by you simply enduring her little fidgeting. Saddle her up, mount and just stand around for a while. You can have her stand around for ages. If she moves around, just ask her not to nice and quietly. She may get frustrated, but she should get bored of her fidgeting and see that it's simpler for her to just stand there nicely. End on a good note of course. You'll need to do this more than once of course. :).

    If her head up in the air when you're asking her to slow/cirlce etc isn't due to teeth or bit intolerancies, it may be just an accessory to her confusion if she's just not sure what you're asking of her when slowing/circling.

    Goodluck :). Would love to hear back about how you get on. Especially if you come across something no-one mentions here that works for you. Am always interested in training techniques.
         
        03-19-2009, 05:18 PM
      #4
    Foal
    Does she stop for you on the ground? It might sound obvious but it is a commonly overlooked solution.
    My suggestion would be to work on the ground, (whatever halter is fine, but I prefer a rope halter for stopping work).
    I do a lot of showmanship where the horse has to really listen to your body language... and you have to work as a team.
    Let me know and I can send you my ground work info.
    Good luck, biggest key is to stay patient!
    -Case
         
        03-19-2009, 07:00 PM
      #5
    Foal
    I had a horse (also named Lucy!!!) that had a terrible time stopping. She took off with me at shows and a home where she tried to knock me off on numerous amounts of trees. Horses that are in pain typically buck or swish their tails a lot. I would highly suggest a tie down if you ride western, or a running martingale if you ride english. What really made the difference for me and Lucy was me changing her bit. I changed her bit and she was a totally different horse. I then was able to take her to shows and win all the speed events safely.
         
        03-20-2009, 07:21 AM
      #6
    Trained
    Quote:
    I had a horse (also named Lucy!!!)
    Good name, huh? But if you have an appaloosie mare, you have to spell it my way!

    I disagree with tie downs & harsher bits. I don't think forcing the horse & making things more painful is the most effective solution, or fair for the horse, but especially in this sort of situation, where it sounds like there's a fair chance it's pain that is causing the behaviour in the first place.

    Of course, if you're wanting to change the bit because you want to avoid pain, that's always a good idea. I find bitless is a great alternative and I will only use a halter or such until a horse is responding & yielding well, so the bit isn't needed for control, but may be wanted for gentle, refined communication.
         
        03-20-2009, 10:55 AM
      #7
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by loosie    
    This could well be a pain issue, so eliminate that first. Back probs, saddle fit, bit, teeth, etc... Many horses also have a problem with bits in general. You can look up Dr Cook's site for more info & alternatives on that.

    Without more info on her training, experience, your training, the way you're riding, etc we can't give you much but it could be that you're being heavy on the reins, that you're not asking her with your seat, that she's never learned to relax under saddle, that she's been a 'hoon' horse before you got her... I would take everything back to the basics, develop a good relationship with her & teach/reinforce good foundation training before asking her for more.
    I completely agree with this - it sounds to me like a saddle fit and/or teeth issue which can be very painful for a horse and being flight animals, when they are not sure what to do their reaction is to just run. Sounds like what's happening here. I'd have her saddle fit checked by someone who is qualified (if I was close i'd do an equi-eval for you - can always do via email if there's no one close) and also have a dentist check her teeth.
         
        03-20-2009, 11:15 AM
      #8
    Started
    What bit do you have in her mouth??
         
        03-21-2009, 05:26 PM
      #9
    Foal
    Thanks everybody! Sorry it took me so long to reply.......
    Loosi :thanks! I double checked with her saddle and you were right it doesn't fit the only thing with that is she was out of shape when I got her so I have been building her muscles up (which is prob. Why her saddle doesn't fit anymore) and she still isn't fully in shape so I will wait on getting a saddle till she fills out completely but I will pad her saddle and see if that helps ^.^ and the bit she (Lucy) informed like 3 weeks ago that she no longer liked the bit I had her in so the past 3 weeks we have been checking out different bits (I have someone helping me out with that so hopefully I will find one soon) and also I know I am not heavy on her mouth but the seat thing is a possability (but I don't think so) basics are definitely a must :) and I had thought learning to stand still was a good one

    Shellbe : thank you :) read above for the fit problems ^ you are right method one would NOT be a good idea not sure about method two but I will give it a try :) and the fidgeting I have tried that and I think it has made it a little better but I will get back to you on that within the month :)

    Shiloh : thanks! Yes she does stop for me on the gorund ^.^ she has nice ground manners (although sometimes we have to do a little review) I would love to see your ground work info! I don't have a lot of things that I can work with her on the ground but I would love to try that (I am really bad with body language so anything that helps would be awesome ^.^ )

    Bilyeuamber that's awesome about the bit change! I personally disagree with martingales (I believe they just mask the problem not deal with it and I want to deal with the problem) but thanks :)

    CJ82SKY : thanks! The saddle is the problem :( sadly but I will be getting a new one in about 6 months ^.^ thanks you so much! How much do you charge?

    Peggysue : I am currently trying to find one she likes ( I am starting to think it might be a teeth problem but she just had them floated not to long ago) so I am just kinda trying out different ones ^.^
         
        03-21-2009, 06:11 PM
      #10
    Started
    Have you tried a french link snaffle??
    Start slow at the walk and when she is GREAT there then go to the trot .... don't speed up until she has in almost PERFECT at th eslower gait,lots of bending and flexing. I bend and flex mine all thur my trail rides to KEEP them responsvie to my aids.. I use my legs and move them side to side on it as well.
         

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