help rearing saddle horse - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #11 of 27 Old 10-27-2008, 01:50 PM
Foal
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Oregon
Posts: 20
• Horses: 0
I am curious about rearing. Some horses have a natural 'talent' that can be capitalized on, so a horse that is a natural rearer might be taught to do it on command.

Roy Roger's horse Trigger could rear and walk 150 paces on his hind legs, a good trick that helped make him a famous movie star horse.

I know this is off topic, so I may post it elsewhere, but do any of you have experience with this? If a horse is not rearing out of panic, it might be fun to encourage the behaviour ... then he'll probably quit doing it if he thinks you like it.


designated driver
Tuffy'sTreatMan is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #12 of 27 Old 10-27-2008, 03:14 PM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: USA
Posts: 21,145
• Horses: 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tuffy'sTreatMan View Post
I am curious about rearing. Some horses have a natural 'talent' that can be capitalized on, so a horse that is a natural rearer might be taught to do it on command.

Roy Roger's horse Trigger could rear and walk 150 paces on his hind legs, a good trick that helped make him a famous movie star horse.

I know this is off topic, so I may post it elsewhere, but do any of you have experience with this? If a horse is not rearing out of panic, it might be fun to encourage the behaviour ... then he'll probably quit doing it if he thinks you like it.

My horse rears on command. Some horses have different vices. Some will buck, some will lay down, some will refuse to go forward, some will rear, etc. (It does not always mean there is an issue with fear or pain...)

My horse just plain is a rearer. So at the age of 3 he reared, I was almost 16, thought it was cool, slapped a command to it and boom... reared on command, so to your question, yes, you can totally turn it into a command. My horse will still rear when he's angry, bored, feeling goofy, or just because.....

"Be a best friend, tell the truth, and overuse I love you
Go to work, do your best, don't outsmart your common sense
Never let your prayin knees get lazy
And love like crazy"
farmpony84 is offline  
post #13 of 27 Old 10-27-2008, 03:18 PM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: mississippi
Posts: 1,399
• Horses: 0
ooooo fp do you have a pic??? I would love to see that

On The 6th day god Created The Quarter Horse...One The 7th he Painted All The Good Ones---*trisha<3
Painted Ride is offline  
post #14 of 27 Old 10-27-2008, 03:42 PM
Showing
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Greenville area / SC
Posts: 13,165
• Horses: 3
I bought a horse once that would rear on command. Very cool except that he would also rear when he decided he wanted to. I sent him back. It was fun for the first week but what a pain in the neck after that. This is a pic of the horse with his old owner (face covered to protect the innocent)
Attachments Pending Approval
File Type:

I'm not arguing with you, I'm just explaining why I'm right.

Nothing sucks more than that moment during an argument when you realize you're wrong.


It's not always what you say but what they hear.
iridehorses is offline  
post #15 of 27 Old 10-27-2008, 03:51 PM
Trained
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 9,883
• Horses: 0
While rearing may seem like a cool thing to do, It's not safe, and I wouldn't recommend teaching a horse to rear, just in case you have to sell him/her further on down the road.
appylover31803 is offline  
post #16 of 27 Old 10-27-2008, 04:07 PM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: USA
Posts: 21,145
• Horses: 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by appylover31803 View Post
While rearing may seem like a cool thing to do, It's not safe, and I wouldn't recommend teaching a horse to rear, just in case you have to sell him/her further on down the road.
I probably have a pic somewhere of me and pistol rearing... we did it for so many years in parades and what not...

I want to say... yes to the above qoute though. The rearing was fun but he did it when I tried to barrel race him, he did it in the show ring, he did it in lessons, he did it at home, he did it everywhere... in fact, he did it last weekend when I took him on trail... he's 24 years old, 75lbs underweight (because he just coliced about a month ago), his teeth are falling out and he still rears!!!! LOL

"Be a best friend, tell the truth, and overuse I love you
Go to work, do your best, don't outsmart your common sense
Never let your prayin knees get lazy
And love like crazy"
farmpony84 is offline  
post #17 of 27 Old 10-27-2008, 04:28 PM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: mississippi
Posts: 1,399
• Horses: 0
^bless his heart!!! Sounds like he's true to what he likes.

On The 6th day god Created The Quarter Horse...One The 7th he Painted All The Good Ones---*trisha<3
Painted Ride is offline  
post #18 of 27 Old 10-27-2008, 06:50 PM
Trained
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Missouri
Posts: 6,004
• Horses: 0
Bill, I like your taste in horses. He's pretty!

Be strong and courageous, and do the work. Don't be afraid or discouraged by the size of the task, for the Lord God, my God, is with you. He will not fail you or forsake you.

1 Chronicles 28:20








Dumas'_Grrrl is offline  
post #19 of 27 Old 10-27-2008, 07:39 PM
Foal
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Morrison, Oklahoma
Posts: 39
• Horses: 3
So there are two issues you are currently dealing with: Barn sour and rearing. For starters with the rearing if you have ruled out pain and physical problems, I would definitely see how your horse responds to a tie down. DO NOT ride him after putting the tie down on him for the first time. Some horses react differently to new tack and tie downs than others, and you may get an even WORSE show of behavior out of defiance/fighting with the newly added device. Put him in the round pen, or lunge him on a lunge line with the tie down on before you decide to ride him with it. After you know he's comfortable with the tie down, I would then decide to ride him out alone. Take him for a short ride away from the barn, and turn him around and go back to the barn while he's still in his "comfort zone". The next day go a little further, just to the point where he feels a little uncomfortable and then bring him back home. Next day go a few feet beyond that and then take him back home. The point is to gradually, slowly increase the distance you have gone away from the barn over the course of multiple rides and KEEP HIM MOVING one way or the other. A horse cannot rear and move his back two legs at the same time. As far as correcting him when he does rear - the correction needs to come BEFORE the rear actually takes place. The rear misbehavior begins the second he thinks of doing it, and begins to prepare himself to do it. The first sign that he gives you that he's thinking about rearing, use a stern voice and say "NO!". Take him in circles and get him moving - redirect his thinking immediately by giving him something else to think about besides rearing. And of course - remember to praise the ever-loving daylights out of him if he decided NOT to rear and follow your command. The praise is just as important as the correction in my opinion.

I hope this helps, and I wish you the best of luck! These tactics worked wonders with my horse Sky when he was going through his "rearing" phase.
katie8758 is offline  
post #20 of 27 Old 10-27-2008, 07:57 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 9
• Horses: 0
thanks for the info I don't think your cruel horses beat the s**** out of each other in the field so the thing that we might do arent going to hurt them I have also heard to use a phone book to
vcary2008 is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
rearing barrelracingchik101 Horse Training 14 08-26-2008 04:36 PM
de gogue for a rearing horse problem fefedog Horse Training 7 05-28-2008 06:44 AM
Using chains on rearing horse kitten_Val Horse Training 1 05-12-2008 03:16 PM
Drawing of Rearing Quarter Horse Quebeth Horse Artwork 4 03-18-2007 04:16 PM
Rearing Horse Madds Horse Training 5 03-17-2007 10:13 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome