Help!! Striking, kicking - does my horse hate me?
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Horse Training

Help!! Striking, kicking - does my horse hate me?

This is a discussion on Help!! Striking, kicking - does my horse hate me? within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Why does my horse strike at me
  • Horse is kicking while running

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    04-06-2009, 04:50 AM
  #1
Foal
Help!! Striking, kicking - does my horse hate me?

I recently (about 8 months ago) bought a 10 year old paint gelding. I keep him at his former owners home, and until recently did not have any real problems from him. He's always been a little pushy, but never really bad. I haven't spent much time with him in the past few months.
Friday I went out to see him, gave him a bath, and tied him to comb his tail. He was frisky, but o.k. Then out of nowhere he became aggitated, started kicking, and rearing. I managed to get him untied, and thought it better to take him to the arena for some lunging than make him stand and have a fight. As soon as we were past the gate he took off, almost nailed me twice with his bucking and ran for a few minutes. I managed to get him into the arena, talked to the former owner to make sure nothing unsual had happened, and returned. We lunged him together, and he settled down.
Today(2 days later), I came out with intentions of lunging and doing some ground work with him, thinking the wind and bath had made him so frisky on Friday. When I brought him to the arena (prancing and acting up) he took off as soon as I let him go, ran a few laps, eyeing me the whole time, then CHARGED ME. I moved closed to a barrel, and he tried to strike me twice. He has NEVER acted this way. I had the vet out 3 weeks ago, and they said he was tip-top. Any ideas? I felt like I was in a pool with a shark, if I didn't have my lungeing whip he woul have got me. He did not act like this when his old owner was with me, which makes me think I'm the problem.
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    04-06-2009, 03:22 PM
  #2
Yearling
Well your right on one account I would have to agree your the problem...... LOL Seriously though, this is extremely bad behaviour.

Will the original owner come out and work with you?

As far as the horse is concerned your just some person who comes out once in awhile and annoys him by taking him away from his food and friends. You haven't taken the time to show the horse that you can be trusted as his leader. If the owner won't/can't help you, you really need to get someone in to show you what to do.

First off that horse needs to be put in his place the second he starts prancing, a horse on a lead line should follow you without any more movement required to move his feet. Secondly you don't let a horse off a lead line to run amok in a ring when he couldnt even walk there quietly. Your lucky you didn't get kicked in the head.

I could go on and on, and I'm sure others will pipe in, but you need help with this NOW! And it needs to be with someone at your side not over the Internet.

This is VERY DANGEROUS behaviour.
     
    04-06-2009, 03:29 PM
  #3
Weanling
I'm not sure of your experience level but it doesn't sound like you are up to handling this type of behavior. This horse sounds like he has your number down flat and is using this to terrorize you. I would suggest finding someone to help you and teach what to do (old owner, trainer in your area etc.). I hesitate to give you advice as I don't want you doing something where you will end up getting hurt. I agree with G & K that you have no established yourself as a leader and that you don't need someone telling you what to do over the internet. You need someone physically there helping you.

I will say that from the sounds of it you are more concerned about being your horse's friend than your horse's leader. The title of your post and the fact that you don't want to 'fight' with your horse further indicate this. You shouldn't be worried about your horse liking you at this point, you should be worried about your horse being safe and compliant.
     
    04-06-2009, 03:32 PM
  #4
mls
Trained
What is his turnout and exercise schedule like? Does he have horse buddies to play with?
     
    04-07-2009, 09:34 PM
  #5
Foal
Well, I was raised around horses, and worked with some great people when I was yonger, but have been out of the horse world for about 5 years since I've been back in college. I think when I was 20 I would have approached the issue more aggressively, but I've found some of my fearlessness has departed as I get older.
I've been out of practice, and this new behavior was a wake up call for sure! The problem is that this was not something that had been built up to. Whenever he was out of line before, I corrected him, and he did great. This was something totaly new, and I just don't get where it's coming from.
I know the dangers of an unruly hore, I'm just baffled by his new attitude. Has anyone else experienced this?
I'm wary of having his old owner work with me and him, because he does great with her, I feel like those problems won't be prsented when she's around.
Either way, just curious to see what some thoughts are on the easiest and safest lol way to correct this. Thanks!
     
    04-07-2009, 09:48 PM
  #6
Foal
I agree with the others, whatever it is that's bugging him should be dealt with ASAP. If he's in good health then he needs a little reminder of who is actually in charge, because you're not only putting yourself in a dangerous situation but, it could become risky for your horse, or others around you at the time.

I've never had this problem before with any of my horses, it almost sounds like he's playing at the wrong time even. Then again, striking and trying to charge you down may not be the signs of playing lol.
Maybe the previous owner could stand at a distance and try to assist you by telling you what to do. That way he/she is not actually doing it for you, and hopefully things will calm back down.
     
    04-07-2009, 11:03 PM
  #7
Foal
Definately get help. This horse needs a serious lesson in manners. I would suggest letting someone else tune him up first and then you take over. You need a few sessions with someone else nearby to make sure you stay safe!

I would also look into his feeding. Has he recently had a diet chaange, ie fresh spring grass? He may be feeling a little to good and this will only make the situation worse.
     
    04-08-2009, 02:36 AM
  #8
Foal
He's always been pushy but not bad....or so you think. But that's not how the horse sees it. If he's been pushy and all he gets is reprimanded, he learns to become desensitized to that and eventually this type of little pushy behavior comes back to bite in a big way.

He's totally clueless, basically and needs to be retrained back at square one to understand what he's supposed to do and what he's not supposed to do.

Where's the release of pressure? That's all he knows. He's not taking any of it personal. He's just doing what has given him a release in the past...and running with it, so to speak.

I'm working with a horse that scares his owners. He's clueless. He tries to run over the top of you or kick at you. But why? Because he's been nagged with pressure (desensitized) and never really told what his place is (in a productive way, not punishment)

Typical scenerio for the horse I'm talking about:
So, he is set free in the arena and he runs around, the person who sets him free backs off when he gets near and he comes in too close and the person backs off and twirls a lead line or wags a whip in his face. He turns to leave, but the person still is twirling the line or wagging the whip and so the horse kicks out.
Basically pressure means nothing. The person means nothing but a nuicance. He's been reprimanded, but he isn't fearful of people and knows if he steps in close the person will back up = there's a release of pressure = when he feels the need, he steps in close faster (charges like) and the person gets out of the way (but he's bluffing, he's not charging, he's just dominating because the person is submitting)

See? It's total confusion to the horse.

If your horse is pushy, if he steps in toward you, tell him to back up now. The moment he backs up, leave him be. Every time he steps forward into you, back him up that many more steps or a bit more. The moment he complies, leave him alone. Then he can start to understand: pressure when he steps into your space and the release is when he doesn't.

Simply be clear with your horse about your intentions, take the lead and don't be reactive to his reactions. He doesn't know what you want, he only knows what is: where's the release? You're irritating him with pressure? Okay, he'll kick out at you. He'll dominate you to make you stop. And you do (by backing off and not giving him clear enough cues).

Take it back to the beginning with this fellow and with the help of a trainer (who's not going to reprimant but who's going to teach him about pressure and finding the release where you do want it (resulting in wanted behavior).

It's like when a horse pins his ears on Monday and bites you on Wednesday. It's not out of the blue, he was already thinking about biting you on Monday, you just didn't notice. See? Same thing.

Don't bother wasting your time trying to stop what you don't want your horse to do. Instead, teach him what you do want him to do and the unwanted stuff will take care of itself.

Hope this helps some.
     
    08-11-2010, 07:39 AM
  #9
Foal
Calamity Jane is awesome with her approach to my horse hates me. I am having the same trouble with my 8yo thoroughbred gelding who I've had since he was 4yo and he has got it over me bad and he freaks me out. Calamity has reminded me of what it is all about and instead of selling this guy off, I need to fix the problem I have created. Luckily I know a young lady who loves a challenge and will be incorporating a bit of Monty Roberts with her no nonsense approach to it all. Either way, his life of leisure is over (all the better for him).
     
    08-11-2010, 08:05 AM
  #10
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Calamity Jane    
If your horse is pushy, if he steps in toward you, tell him to back up now. The moment he backs up, leave him be. Every time he steps forward into you, back him up that many more steps or a bit more. The moment he complies, leave him alone. Then he can start to understand: pressure when he steps into your space and the release is when he doesn't.

Simply be clear with your horse about your intentions, take the lead and don't be reactive to his reactions. He doesn't know what you want, he only knows what is: where's the release? You're irritating him with pressure? Okay, he'll kick out at you. He'll dominate you to make you stop. And you do (by backing off and not giving him clear enough cues).

Take it back to the beginning with this fellow and with the help of a trainer (who's not going to reprimant but who's going to teach him about pressure and finding the release where you do want it (resulting in wanted behavior).
I agree that this is a good approach. The 'my space' concept is something very basic with horses that you, as leader, need to (re)establish. Our old saying is that you have to 'act big', being proactive, not reactive. If you give up your space, any horse will be happy to take it.
     

Quick Reply
Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
kicking out when being blanketed appylover31803 Horse Training 14 01-19-2009 05:42 PM
sporatic kicking foothillscowgirl Horse Health 3 10-06-2008 11:36 AM
Kicking in the trailer...... goin' gaiting Horse Training 3 09-28-2008 08:19 AM
Kicking Erin_And_Jasper Horse Training 15 09-05-2008 10:01 PM
kicking brandig Horse Training 0 03-07-2007 11:35 AM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:11 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0