HELP! strong horse
 
 

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HELP! strong horse

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  • How to school a strong horse
  • Training a strong horse

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    06-02-2012, 10:27 AM
  #1
Foal
Exclamation HELP! strong horse

Hi there,
I have been asked to ride my friend's horse and school him on in his jumping because she only likes to hack on him. I have been having problems finding the correct bit for him because when he hacks or does flatwork in walk & trot he behaves perfectly in a full cheek snaffle but when he canters or jumps he gets very strong and pulls his head between his legs & just takes off with me. I have tried him in a dutch gag which only makes him worse & a jointed pelham holds him back to a normal speed but he still can pull through it when he wants. Can someone suggest a way to fix this or any other bit to try???

He is a 12yr old 15.1hh thoroughbred who is an ex-racehorse & he has only been jumping for the last year or so but gets very excited when he does so.
     
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    06-02-2012, 12:15 PM
  #2
Green Broke
One rein stop. I suggest keeping him in the full cheek and when you even slightly feel him start to tuck his head put him in a circle or slightly bump him( just a small squeeze). If he still takes off pull him around in a one rein stop. Don't go to a stronger bit for canter work just work on getting him focused on you and work through his problem.
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    06-02-2012, 12:19 PM
  #3
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by BarrelracingArabian    
One rein stop. I suggest keeping him in the full cheek and when you even slightly feel him start to tuck his head put him in a circle or slightly bump him( just a small squeeze). If he still takes off pull him around in a one rein stop. Don't go to a stronger bit for canter work just work on getting him focused on you and work through his problem.
Posted via Mobile Device
*thanks I will try that with him tomorrow I have tried circling before but never tried the one reign stop :)
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    06-02-2012, 12:22 PM
  #4
Green Broke
With the circles make them spiral so he has to pay attention to where his feet are and not so much on taking off. That worked for me and my boy when he used to take off :)
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    06-02-2012, 04:54 PM
  #5
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by BarrelracingArabian    
With the circles make them spiral so he has to pay attention to where his feet are and not so much on taking off. That worked for me and my boy when he used to take off :)
Posted via Mobile Device
*okayy i'll try that and see how he goes only one way to find out :) thanks for ur help :)
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    06-02-2012, 05:18 PM
  #6
Green Broke
Welcome :) goodluck
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    06-02-2012, 06:14 PM
  #7
Showing
Cavalettis will slow a horse down. You need to set up a series of cavaletti, some on the ground, then a further spaced one with two rails forming an X. The poles will make him pay attention to where he's placing his feet. Lots of info on cavaletti can be googled.
     
    06-05-2012, 11:36 AM
  #8
Weanling
I rode a former racehorse and he had the same issue, getting super excited at the canter. Its like the aderenaline would take over and nothing could calm him down.

A lot of OTTBs have balance issues on their own, which makes it harder for their rider to be balanced on them. Then they feel you shifting around and getting stiff, and they get scared. Then they run through their fear. So take the time to really collect the horse! That is the only thing that helped us! Good luck! I hope he enjoys his new job!
     
    06-05-2012, 11:58 AM
  #9
Weanling
You don't need a different bit. In fact, you ought to go back to a snaffle bit. He doesn't respect the bit, so before you focus on ground work, you need to train him to respond.
CJ82Sky likes this.
     
    06-05-2012, 12:16 PM
  #10
Started
I agree with the above post. It's not about the bit, nor about doing a one rein stop. Horses that rush the canter and/or jumping usually do so out of lack of balance. Better balance comes from better topline and muscling, and better topline and muscling come from better trot.

When the horse has better balance and is muscled properly for the task at hand, the speed at the canter, the overall responsiveness, and the speed to the fences will slow down significantly. Remember - it takes FAR more muscle and balance to go slowly than to rush or move quickly.

Trust me on this - the pictures below show the remuscling of my OTTB over the years. In the 2nd picture he was jumping but was a total bull to ride - dragging to the fences, yanking on me, bolting, rushing, and as you can see I tried a three ring elevator bit...to no avail. Went back to a much simpler bit and worked on more trot work over the years and he's a totally different horse now. For bits he's in a myler bit however the bit came AFTER the training as it is a bit for a finished horse, NOT a correctional bit. I corrected the issue with training and trot work in a very simple, plain bit.

I'm going to c/p what I posted in another thread about how to accomplish this properly:

Quote:
Originally Posted by CJ82Sky    
for muscling and balance, trot trot and more trot. And when you think you are done, trot some more. Build up in increments so your horse has time to condition (start with just 10 - 15 min depending on how fit she is now) and then added 2-4 minutes per workout every other to every third workout. And stop cantering. For a few reasons.

1) canter burns more calories than it builds muscle, while trotting builds more muscle while burning less calories when compared to the canter
2) horses develop a better canter by doing better trot, not by cantering more, so by taking a break from cantering, when you come back to it, you will be amazed with the improvement
3) lots of bending and changing direction and working on a light rein contact will do wonders for also helping her balance and relax and again help her canter in the long run
4) all that trot work will build amazing topline and muscling

Pictures to prove it:
Sky, aged 4, just off the track going through "letdown"


Sky, age 7, after a few years of remuscling (notice neck still very thick/upside down):


Sky, age 11, schooling at a show:


Sky, age 14 (this year) widest he has ever been - at a hunter pace/horse park:
     

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