Helping With Foward movement
 
 

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Helping With Foward movement

This is a discussion on Helping With Foward movement within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

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        06-23-2014, 04:31 PM
      #1
    Foal
    Exclamation Helping With Foward movement

    Trying to keep this simple...
    I've been training a new horse, he's 8 and has only been ridden 20x before the person gave up and handed him to me. So I've only trained ex-race horses to keep them from slaughter, which means they usually have a bunch of energy. He on the other hand, is quite lazy, since he's not used to being ridden. He is a Russian Don horse though which means he could be a race horse. Within 2 days of training I managed to get him in to a steady trot for at least 2 rounds. I teach bareback, and eventually without bridle. But the thing is, he always stops. Randomly. I still couldnt get him into a canter... even on lunge without a rider. Im having the farrier check his feet this next week but by what I see there's nothing wrong. I need some advice from good trainer on how to get a lazy horse back into the rhtym, and get more foward motion going.
    PS: I don't use spurs, and only use a lunging whip.
         
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        06-23-2014, 04:50 PM
      #2
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by EquineCloud    
    Trying to keep this simple...
    I've been training a new horse, he's 8 and has only been ridden 20x before the person gave up and handed him to me. So I've only trained ex-race horses to keep them from slaughter, which means they usually have a bunch of energy. He on the other hand, is quite lazy, since he's not used to being ridden. He is a Russian Don horse though which means he could be a race horse. Within 2 days of training I managed to get him in to a steady trot for at least 2 rounds. I teach bareback, and eventually without bridle. But the thing is, he always stops. Randomly. I still couldnt get him into a canter... even on lunge without a rider. Im having the farrier check his feet this next week but by what I see there's nothing wrong. I need some advice from good trainer on how to get a lazy horse back into the rhtym, and get more foward motion going.
    PS: I don't use spurs, and only use a lunging whip.
    These highlighted parts are areas of concern for me. I have a few questions, are you RIDING him with a lunge whip? Why are you only riding bareback? Also, why no spurs?

    From the way you put it, it sounds like he is balking which can turn nasty quick. Sounds like he needs a good spanking
    Prinella likes this.
         
        06-23-2014, 05:50 PM
      #3
    Weanling
    Although the horse has been ridden twenty times, we don't know how he has been ridden or with what consistency. It is very likely that much of the problem is the result of being insecure with a rider on his back. Some horses that are insecure with a rider try to run away from their problems. Others are afraid to move. There is also a high likelihood that the horse is uncertain of what it is supposed to be doing.

    Although this horse is eight years old, he is inexperienced. You should approach him as a preschool student. Start from the ground up. Don't be in a hurry to canter. Wait until you have a consistent walk and trot.

    Think of what you are asking the horse to do. He is accustomed to moving his own unencumbered body at his own pleasure. He is now being asked to move at a rider's discretion with an unaccustomed weight on his back. At a walk, he generally has three feet on the ground to support this weight. At a trot, two diagonal feet support the weight. In two steps of a canter, he is asked to support this weight on a single foot.

    This horse needs to develop strength and flexibility. The better balanced you are over his center of balance, the lower your center of gravity, and the better your body moves with his, the easier this will be for him.
    Fahntasia and mslady254 like this.
         
        06-23-2014, 05:52 PM
      #4
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by TXhorseman    
    Although the horse has been ridden twenty times, we don't know how he has been ridden or with what consistency. It is very likely that much of the problem is the result of being insecure with a rider on his back. Some horses that are insecure with a rider try to run away from their problems. Others are afraid to move. There is also a high likelihood that the horse is uncertain of what it is supposed to be doing.

    Although this horse is eight years old, he is inexperienced. You should approach him as a preschool student. Start from the ground up. Don't be in a hurry to canter. Wait until you have a consistent walk and trot.

    Think of what you are asking the horse to do. He is accustomed to moving his own unencumbered body at his own pleasure. He is now being asked to move at a rider's discretion with an unaccustomed weight on his back. At a walk, he generally has three feet on the ground to support this weight. At a trot, two diagonal feet support the weight. In two steps of a canter, he is asked to support this weight on a single foot.

    This horse needs to develop strength and flexibility. The better balanced you are over his center of balance, the lower your center of gravity, and the better your body moves with his, the easier this will be for him.
    The OP also mentioned she can't even get him to canter on the lunge line. Which might also be a product of laziness and never being told he "has" to do something.

    IMO he isn't taking what you're asking seriously. Basically blowing you off. Then again, that's just from what I've gathered from your short explanation
         
        06-23-2014, 06:03 PM
      #5
    Foal
    I have a problem with my new paint gelding very similar to the OP's, but my paint moves wonderfully on the ground, but refuses to go under saddle and is lazy under saddle, I'm very curious to see what has to be said here and what advice shall be given.
    Posted via Mobile Device
         
        06-23-2014, 06:10 PM
      #6
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ZombieHorseChick    
    I have a problem with my new paint gelding very similar to the OP's, but my paint moves wonderfully on the ground, but refuses to go under saddle and is lazy under saddle, I'm very curious to see what has to be said here and what advice shall be given.
    Posted via Mobile Device
    I'm a firm believer in "marching". If I have a lazy horse who doesn't like to move that is all the more reason to move. I would work on going forward at all 3 gears. Make them "march" around at the walk, trot, and eventually lope. Really drive with your seat and legs. Once they start going forward willingly, stop pushing. The release of pressure is their reward. They will start to understand that going forward and doing what you ask is easier than not.

    This is one of my favorite qualities of a lazy horse, they will always choose the path of least resistance. In this case the easier path MUST be to go forward and listen no matter what. Whether that be by using spurs, a crop, reins, or just simply driving with your seat.
         
        06-23-2014, 06:33 PM
      #7
    Trained
    TAMG has a default setting of stop, so it takes a lot to keep him going. Our best results have come from letting go all contact, and just working on driving him forward, ask, niggle, CORRECT, reward, lather rinse repeat as needed. He picks more or less his own direction, although working vaguely on a circle in the middle of the arena, and certainly chooses where to carry his head. With that approach we can get more consistent energy out of him, and once we have that, I get to slowly work on taking a little contact.
         
        06-24-2014, 07:49 AM
      #8
    Foal
    @Delete: The whole bareback thing is so I can teach him not only with legs, but my seat as well. I do ride in a saddle. Although, I don't believe in hitting a horse for it to do what its told. I want to see a horse wanting to do what it wants. And no, I don't ride with a lnge whip, I lunge him with it.
         
        06-24-2014, 08:01 AM
      #9
    Yearling
    Why ask for a canter on board when you can't get it on the ground. Sounds like playing crash test dummy to me.

    This horse has possibly never cantered under saddle and could well be confused As well. Get him more confident on the ground and don't take no for an answer.


    Put him on the lunge and MAKE him move. If he's comfortable at trot ask for a canter and keep asking until you get even one stride then back off. If he's not solid at the trot there's your issue. As with anything increase the pressure you use until you get the transition then instantly back off.



    I personally like to be able to have them walk to canter and back to walk before I get on. Makes me more confident they can cope with their energy.
         
        06-24-2014, 08:01 AM
      #10
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by EquineCloud    
    @Delete: The whole bareback thing is so I can teach him not only with legs, but my seat as well. I do ride in a saddle. Although, I don't believe in hitting a horse for it to do what its told. I want to see a horse wanting to do what it wants. And no, I don't ride with a lnge whip, I lunge him with it.
    This can be accomplished in a saddle.
         

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    foward movent, training a lazy horse

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