Helping a horse overcome bad experiences - Page 2
   

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Horse Training

Helping a horse overcome bad experiences

This is a discussion on Helping a horse overcome bad experiences within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

    Like Tree39Likes

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        04-15-2013, 06:55 PM
      #11
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JavaLover    
    He is never tied. I'm working with him in a round pen, and he loves to be groomed. I can rub him around his body, he just freaks out when the saddle comes near him. He has never been ridden, just had the saddle thrown on.
    Posted via Mobile Device
    Can he be tied?
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        04-15-2013, 11:33 PM
      #12
    Started
    If you are eager to start his work in riding, what about for now just starting him bareback? Or try introducing him to a bareback pad
         
        04-16-2013, 12:19 AM
      #13
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Nokotaheaven    
    If you are eager to start his work in riding, what about for now just starting him bareback? Or try introducing him to a bareback pad
    I wouldn't do this personally, to ignore the issue is to leave a huge great hole that needs to be sorted out, so no, get him over the issue first THEN think about riding.

    Treat this guy as a blank sheet, think of him as a baby just starting, you expect him not to know things so you have to teach him, but to do that you have to be confident. That means letting go of thoughts of him being scared, and just expecting him to accept things because he trusts you.
         
        04-16-2013, 12:52 AM
      #14
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Golden Horse    
    I wouldn't do this personally, to ignore the issue is to leave a huge great hole that needs to be sorted out, so no, get him over the issue first THEN think about riding.

    Treat this guy as a blank sheet, think of him as a baby just starting, you expect him not to know things so you have to teach him, but to do that you have to be confident. That means letting go of thoughts of him being scared, and just expecting him to accept things because he trusts you.
    Yes, normally I would do that. But I got thinking, the bareback pad should similate a riding blanket and/or saddle because of the cinch. But it's also different than both, so in turn it may make him relate it to them yet maybe be less fearful.. And if that's the case, then it might actually help to remove his fear of the saddle and/or blanket. This I don't know for certain, but I would like to experiment upon
         
        04-16-2013, 08:11 AM
      #15
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JavaLover    
    He is never tied. I'm working with him in a round pen, and he loves to be groomed. I can rub him around his body, he just freaks out when the saddle comes near him. He has never been ridden, just had the saddle thrown on.
    Posted via Mobile Device

    Having him in this big an area is not helping here.

    Do you at least have him haltered and lead on him?

    Getting him in stall would be easier to work on this, as he couldn't get by with so much.

    And much depends on how you are approaching with blanket/saddle too.

    As well as how quickly you back off when horse acts up.

    What is he doing specifically, moving sideways, rearing, striking, kicking?

    How much experience do you have with horses, particularly in this sort of thing?
         
        04-16-2013, 10:43 AM
      #16
    Trained
    LOL, again I find myself on the other side:

    Having tried lots of methods of doing things, I personally choose never to tie a horse when introducing something potentially scary, also would choose the round pen over a stall, I want the movement. Well I don't want it, I would prefer that they stand still and accept the new thing just because I say it's OK, but I won't force them to stand still and accept anything. I use approach and retreat, and also follow to get over any reservations. I really like follow, approach with scary saddle, he starts to get worried, then turn around a walk with him, have him follow the saddle and you around, seeing it in front and retreating from them gives them a chance to check out new things while keeping a safe distance, but still being positively engaged.

    Not every method works for every horse, or every horse and rider combination, this is where experience comes in, finding the best approach for that horse.
    Nokotaheaven and Dustbunny like this.
         
        04-16-2013, 10:50 AM
      #17
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Golden Horse    
    LOL, again I find myself on the other side:

    Having tried lots of methods of doing things, I personally choose never to tie a horse when introducing something potentially scary, also would choose the round pen over a stall, I want the movement. Well I don't want it, I would prefer that they stand still and accept the new thing just because I say it's OK, but I won't force them to stand still and accept anything. I use approach and retreat, and also follow to get over any reservations. I really like follow, approach with scary saddle, he starts to get worried, then turn around a walk with him, have him follow the saddle and you around, seeing it in front and retreating from them gives them a chance to check out new things while keeping a safe distance, but still being positively engaged.

    Not every method works for every horse, or every horse and rider combination, this is where experience comes in, finding the best approach for that horse.
    I totally agree with you
         
        04-16-2013, 10:54 AM
      #18
    Showing
    I want to know why the horse is never tied. Sometimes horses have to be tied, and if you have one that can't/won't do it, you're kind of limited to where you can go and what you can do with them.
         
        04-16-2013, 11:02 AM
      #19
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Speed Racer    
    I want to know why the horse is never tied. Sometimes horses have to be tied, and if you have one that can't/won't do it, you're kind of limited to where you can go and what you can do with them.
    On the contrary, to tie a horse (no matter why he's acting the way he is) when you try to teach him something is forcing them to do something. It will make them lose all respect for you. Do it in a round pen, but have a long lead rope on so that while you do it you'll allow the horse the freedom to move if he has to, but he won't be able to get away. And just correct him by putting him back in the same spot if he moves.
    That's one thing i've learned.. NEVER tie a horse for stuff like that, especially not if he's afraid... Because then if he freaks out enough he'll pull on the rope until he's either hurt himself or the rope snaps in half.. I once tied a horse that I didn't know had never been tied before (he was soo good in training).. When he went to move and felt the restraint of the rope he freaked right out and pulled back with all his might until the rope completely snapped in half.. And it was a thick thick rope too
         
        04-16-2013, 11:08 AM
      #20
    Showing
    Oh dear Lord, who the heck said anything about FORCING the horse? I asked a simple question. Why CAN'T the horse be tied?

    If he can't be tied that's a training deficit, not because someone's being cruel to his poor little psyche and MAKING him do something he doesn't want to do. A horse who can't be tied to anything before, during and after a trail ride/show is a liability. If the horse doesn't want to tie, you TEACH him to tie. I won't have a horse that won't stand tied. That makes them fairly worthless in my book.

    If everyone was all about never 'forcing' their horses to do anything, nobody would ride, trailer, or do any of the myriad things we do with them. They'd stand out in a field and be left alone because THAT'S what they really want to do.

    My horses respect me just fine, thank you. Yes, they HAVE to do what I want when I want them to. They're not afraid of me, just know that I'm in charge. This whole, 'train with lurve and never make Pookie do anything he doesn't want to do' stuff gets on my danged nerves.
    themacpack likes this.
         

    Thread Tools

    Similar Threads
    Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
    Bad Horse Riding Accidents & How did you overcome it? Marquie93 Horse Talk 8 08-10-2011 07:03 PM
    How to overcome horse clamping jaw shut when trying to tack up? ArabianDream Horse Training 9 02-12-2011 06:58 PM
    Bad Show Experiences AislingxXx1234 Horse Shows 4 12-29-2010 12:48 AM
    Bad experiences with barn managers... grr! Gleebee Barn Maintenance 11 06-02-2009 07:31 PM
    BAD riding experiences!!! Share Yours! Lots of Ouch! Small_Town_Girl Horse Riding 12 07-13-2008 02:33 PM



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:34 AM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0