Helpp!? - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 11 Old 05-06-2013, 03:21 PM Thread Starter
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Helpp!?

I have a paint horse named thunderheart we got him a couple months ago. When we first got him he was skiny,had lice, and thrush. We got him good and fat and got rid of the thrush and lice. When I first started riding him he did great!! Neck reind and etc. And he also grooomed great, now you try to pick up his back feet and he kicks and one time broke a fence. And he wont take a bit or bridle anytime you bring it near him he doesnt rear he just jerks his head until you move it away.

Any ideas why? Or any training tips?
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post #2 of 11 Old 05-06-2013, 03:33 PM
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A trainer. That's my tip. My guess is timidity when picking out his back feet taught him he could avoid it by wiggling his foot, which built into kicking. Don't tie him close enough to a fence that he could kick it while you're cleaning his back feet.
For bridling, ask him to lower his head by placing one hand at the poll, the other on the bridge of his nose. Place pressure at the poll while moving his face back and forth with the hand on his face. Release when he drops his head, let him lift it back up. Leave him alone if he leaves it down, keep asking him to drop it after he picks it up, until your touch at his poll makes him drop his head. Take him to a round pen, make sure you can touch his ears, poll, neck, everything, both sides. If he doesn't stay with you, send him of in the round pen and make him work his tush. Ask him to come back in and try again. He'll soon learn he can either work his booty off, or stand and rest with you in the middle. He'll be more inclined to let you touch anything. Then, with those two tools, you can start to work on bridling.
'He doesn't rear, he just jerks his head until you move it away'
He's training you. ;) and you're training him to jerk his head when you bridle. He jerks his head, you move it away. You're releasing the pressure for the wrong reaction. That release of pressure is reinforcing the behavior. Don't ask for anything you can't finish, because you can't stop once you've started. Whatever he is doing when you release the pressure is what he'll be more inclined to do next time you apply that pressure. Does that all make sense?
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post #3 of 11 Old 05-06-2013, 09:23 PM
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You need a trainer.
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post #4 of 11 Old 05-06-2013, 09:42 PM
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Based on the photo you posted in the barn, I'd guess pain. He's quite underweight, and that saddle (from what little I can see of it) looks like it doesn't fit well - and cinched up really really tightly. He's also over at the knee and the knees just don't look quite right, I wonder if there's some arthritis there that's flaring up.


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post #5 of 11 Old 05-12-2013, 11:09 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by JustDressageIt View Post
Based on the photo you posted in the barn, I'd guess pain. He's quite underweight, and that saddle (from what little I can see of it) looks like it doesn't fit well - and cinched up really really tightly. He's also over at the knee and the knees just don't look quite right, I wonder if there's some arthritis there that's flaring up.
Trust me that was way before he looks and feels much better. We care for our horses.
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post #6 of 11 Old 05-12-2013, 11:09 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JustDressageIt View Post
Based on the photo you posted in the barn, I'd guess pain. He's quite underweight, and that saddle (from what little I can see of it) looks like it doesn't fit well - and cinched up really really tightly. He's also over at the knee and the knees just don't look quite right, I wonder if there's some arthritis there that's flaring up.
And he is piegon toed, for one.
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post #7 of 11 Old 05-12-2013, 12:02 PM
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Can you post a current picture so we can see saddle fit? Avoiding you putting the bit in his mouth could mean his teeth need a floating.

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post #8 of 11 Old 05-12-2013, 12:12 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by MsBHavin View Post
Can you post a current picture so we can see saddle fit? Avoiding you putting the bit in his mouth could mean his teeth need a floating.
Yes im going over today to work with him ill take a picture. And that's also what we were thinking but we werent sure. Because he's real touchy with his face we also think were he came from he was abused.
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post #9 of 11 Old 05-12-2013, 12:14 PM
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Now that he's back to good health, you may be seeing his true temperament. Where did you get him? If you bought him at auction, there might have been a reason he was there other than just because someone couldn't afford him any longer.

Animals that are sick and/or underweight don't have any fight in them. Once they're back up to a healthy weight, their real personalities come through.

Please don't throw out the abuse card. Unless you know it with absolute certainty because you saw the abuse yourself, there's very little validity to that type of claim. There are many reasons he could be acting the way he does, and none of them are because of abuse.
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Last edited by Speed Racer; 05-12-2013 at 12:17 PM.
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post #10 of 11 Old 05-12-2013, 12:40 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Speed Racer View Post
Now that he's back to good health, you may be seeing his true temperament. Where did you get him? If you bought him at auction, there might have been a reason he was there other than just because someone couldn't afford him any longer.

Animals that are sick and/or underweight don't have any fight in them. Once they're back up to a healthy weight, their real personalities come through.

Please don't throw out the abuse card. Unless you know it with absolute certainty because you saw the abuse yourself, there's very little validity to that type of claim. There are many reasons he could be acting the way he does, and none of them are because of abuse.
Its things weve beentold by previious owners I wouldnt just throw the abuse card around, he's scared of certian things and. For one his face like he's been hit or something, we got him from a man who buys and sells horses. They were nice people. And he's a sweet horse he just trys to get the best of people, and I know that and I don't purposely let him get away with things but when it comes to my safety or letting him get by id rather choose to not get kicked in the head or ran over.

Last edited by aliciajohnson1; 05-12-2013 at 12:43 PM.
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