Is her rearing part of the young horse tantrums.... - Page 4
   

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Is her rearing part of the young horse tantrums....

This is a discussion on Is her rearing part of the young horse tantrums.... within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

     
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        05-11-2010, 09:59 PM
      #31
    Started
    Yeah, I'm going to have to agree. Very irresponsible and one of the worst things you could do. It should only be used for the experienced rider and horse. That could be the root of all your problems, As to why your horse is rearing and being the way he is. It is a very very harsh bit in inexperienced hands.

    :( I can't believe I didn't even pick up on this until someone pointed it out.
         
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        05-11-2010, 11:25 PM
      #32
    Weanling
    Usually you start with the simplest of bits to begin with. If you had started with the reins on the snaffle part in the beginning that would have made more sense than starting on the shanks. The more simple you start the more the horse has a chance to truly understand and progress. What made you decide on the wonder bit? If it is meant to "lift the horse around the corners" it could be possible she doesn't need that particular correction. Basically, what happened is that you were using a bit to correct something that wasn't even happening yet or at all. Next time, if there is one, use a snaffle. No need to get fancy.
         
        05-12-2010, 03:01 PM
      #33
    Foal
    Yeah, that makes a lot of sense. I actually didnt even think to put them on the snaffle part until a few weeks in. But when we started, just walking and working on giving to the bit, etc it didnt really matter much. I am sure things would have gone a lot better if I did start the right way, but I think I caught it before it got to crazy. I know she flipped once, but I am not letting my irresponsibilities change the way I think about her or treat her.
    I have been riding her every night, and since I got the new bit, she has been great! No threatening or aggressive behaviors. :)

    They had the barrels set up last night and we walked the pattern about 15 times. She wasnt even timid about them! I was so proud of her. My little sister video taped us.. haha
         
        05-12-2010, 05:51 PM
      #34
    Green Broke
    So I can assume since you repeatedly walked her around a cloverleaf patter you want to barrel train her then? In that case she doesnt need to even see a pattern before she knows how to rate, side pass, counter arc, and do much more complicated maneuvers...
         
        05-12-2010, 09:44 PM
      #35
    Trained
    Flying lead changes, soft collected stops at all gaits, haunches in and out at all gaits.
         
        05-13-2010, 11:12 AM
      #36
    Foal
    Uhm, no actually I am not going to train her in barrels. I don't see anything wrong with walking around a barrel pattern numerous times. She got to see the barrels, and it was a nice warm up. Gosh you all are so negative nancy.
    I took her out with the cows last night, what are you guys going to say about that??

    I think I got everything I needed out of this post, thanks.
    Goodbye.
         
        05-13-2010, 07:09 PM
      #37
    Trained
    Cows are a fabulous thing for young horses - They tend to forget about what is bothering them and they really learn to follow their nose.

    I've already had Latte out with the cows - Admittedly at quite a distance :]
         
        05-14-2010, 07:27 PM
      #38
    Green Broke
    My bad, Bmunch, I just assumed(wrongly of course), thank you for correcting me.

    I stll do not see the use in walking her repeatedly around a cloverleaf pattern but to each their own right?.

    We are not negative nancies, we are just very opinionated and want to help out by sharing our wisdom... lol they need to make that a disclaimer to new members I think, so many come on here and get all defensive when they are told they may be wrong.
         
        05-14-2010, 10:07 PM
      #39
    Foal
    Lots of words to read but just a couple of things:

    1. Throwin out her hind legs at you for any reason is a no no. Usually a big sign of respect issues. Need to fix this issue and some of the others will go away as they are just other signs of the same problem.

    2. Seems like she is pretty unsure of herself goin backward. Remember the flight instinct--if back is not an option and you have shut the front and side doors the only other way to flee is up.

    3. Rearing is one thing and can be fixed. Flippin is another and usually cannot once the pattern is established. Lost a few friends to flippin horses so my advice is to get some help fixin things before it becomes a pattern.

    4. Remember training a horse is a system. If you jump from kindergarden to 5th grade and then back to first grade nothin gets learned. You will spend the rest of your life continually having to fix things. Get on a system and stick with it--no graduatin grade school unless it is earned and the lessons are learned.
         
        05-17-2010, 06:51 PM
      #40
    Foal
    Yikes, very dangerous stuff.
    My horse used to rear when I first got him. He eventually ended up flipping over and that has scared him out of doing it for good. I was lucky.
    As others have suggested, get help! This is an incredibly dangerous habit and should not be taken lightly. It's best to get profressional help and guidence, as well as obvious pain checks.

    EDIT: Just read rest of thread. Glad to hear she's behaving now. It may well have been down to the bit all along. A wrongly fitted/suited bit can cause a lot of problems. Good luck with her!
         

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