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This is a discussion on HeY within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
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    01-23-2008, 05:18 PM
  #1
Foal
HeY

HEY ALL.

I am working in a farm a year now, and also riding.

During the time I got to spent with horses I went through a process with myself.
Now I know I want to be a horse trainer.
I raed alot about the subject, and I support riding only with a saddle. Now I ride with the whole "package" 'cause I have no choice in my farm.

My question is - assuming I will already have enough exprience in several farms and years of riding - where do I learn to be a horse trainer? And in the specific method that I want?
Is there a specail school? A college? A university? A specific trainer?
And in which country? SOMWHERE IN EUROPE?
'cause im half canadien. Is there anything in Canada?

As you can see I have no clue where to go. Thanks for your answers.

And to be more clear - this is a short clip of the kind of trainer I want to be - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sJpb0...eature=related
     
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    01-23-2008, 05:52 PM
  #2
Weanling
The best thing do is get as much experience as you can with as many different trainers as possible.
I've been riding for about 10 years now, and have ridden with a number of people, taking something from each of them and applying it to the three boys Im riding now.
There are some post secondary programs here in Canada that you could attend, but I would rather send my horse to someone with practical experience and a show record then someone who has just been to school for training.
     
    01-23-2008, 05:56 PM
  #3
Showing
Spotless,

I live in Canada, and you should become certified to become an official trainer. That means passing tests and the such to get this certification. I have been studying with my own trainer to gain the experience needed to pass these tests. You could get a "mentor" of sorts, and you need a certain amount of practical hours to be able to achieve this.
So far, I have taken on one horse to date to train solo. I got this opportunity because I have made myself a name in the horsey world (so to speak) and this person contacted me to train her horse. So we'll see how it goes.
If you are a good enough rider, you can start offering to exercise others' horses for a small fee (or for free at the beginning) and slowly build yourself a name (this will take a while!!). Some trainers have never attended a school for horse-related subjects rather built up their name and then got certified. People came to them because they heard what a great trainer they were.
As far as "horse training schools" go, you can search on Google for your state/province's equine schools. I know that in Alberta we have Olds College , but their program isn't the best... so if you do find something, then I would suggest talking to trainers in the area for the college's reputation. Personally I don't like how Olds teaches their techniques, so I wouldn't hire someone from there as far as riding/training goes.. however they turn out wonderful farriers.
I'm getting off track.
Another thing you can do is phone up trainers and arrange to meet and talk with them about how they got into it... because personally I just kind of fell into it.
My attention span's that of a gnat right now, please excuse me. Please feel free to PM me to ask anything :)
     
    01-23-2008, 05:58 PM
  #4
Showing
Oh, and if you're interested in PNH, Pat Parelli has set up his own "NH College".. although it's fairly expensive from what I've heard.

My best advice is to gain practical experience, and go from there. Build up a name and riding/training method by working on your own horses, then branch out.
     
    01-23-2008, 06:16 PM
  #5
Weanling
Good advice justdressageit! Also Spotless you should PM Spirithorse, she is our resident guru on NH and would probably be able to tell you who to call or where to start looking. Oh and WELCOME!
     
    01-23-2008, 06:17 PM
  #6
Showing
Thanks, I Love Lane! It's a fairly tough question, given the seeming simplicity of it!
     
    01-24-2008, 02:57 AM
  #7
Foal
Thank you!

I assumed it's not a mattar of "go to college and get a diploma of a horse trainer".
I will try to gain exprience like you said, and find out about NH school though it is expencive.

I live in Israel, I guess I can ask about good horse trainers here... but if I have access to Canada I think it is better.

Some of you riding only with a saddle?
     
    01-24-2008, 09:08 AM
  #8
Green Broke
Might I suggest learning to ride without a saddle? Bareback is a great teacher for balance and I personally feel that you connect better with your horse. Im not saying don't ever use a saddle, personally I perfer with saddle that way I can work better with my horse. But I think learning to ride without a saddle is a great way to get better balance and to understand how your horse moves.
     
    01-24-2008, 09:45 AM
  #9
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by .Delete.
Might I suggest learning to ride without a saddle? Bareback is a great teacher for balance and I personally feel that you connect better with your horse. Im not saying don't ever use a saddle, personally I perfer with saddle that way I can work better with my horse. But I think learning to ride without a saddle is a great way to get better balance and to understand how your horse moves.
Yeah or even without stirrups. It helped my balence alot.
     
    01-24-2008, 11:04 AM
  #10
Foal
Yeah , I think it really improves the balance.
You can feel the big difference after you sit again on a saddle.
But in the farm where I work, it's an english riding school. And no lessons without a saddle.

I guess it's a work that should be done with a specific horse , and in a long term realatioship
     

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