High Headed Horse - Page 3 - The Horse Forum
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post #21 of 40 Old 01-09-2014, 10:39 AM
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To be honest, at his worst he looks like Mia (Arabian) does normally:





That is a pretty normal way for a lot of horses to move. If you want a significant amount of collection, then the dressage training scale can show you the steps it takes to train a horse for it. I don't because it doesn't matter to me. If it matters to you, I'd suggest getting some good books on dressage. You could also probably get some good ideas both for training and books by asking on the HF dressage sub-forum. Good luck!
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post #22 of 40 Old 01-09-2014, 10:54 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bsms View Post

That is a pretty normal way for a lot of horses to move. If you want a significant amount of collection, then the dressage training scale can show you the steps it takes to train a horse for it. I don't because it doesn't matter to me. If it matters to you, I'd suggest getting some good books on dressage. You could also probably get some good ideas both for training and books by asking on the HF dressage sub-forum. Good luck!
Okay thanks! I never thought of that before. But it's a good idea. I just need collection, because he's hollowing out his back, and it leads to away back later in life. And I'm training him to show hunters and jumpers so he kind of needs to lower it a little bit
Anyways, thanks for the dressage idea!
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post #23 of 40 Old 01-09-2014, 11:30 AM
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For hunters and jumpers, I'll recommend:

Common Sense Horsemanship by VS Littauer

http://www.amazon.com/Common-sense-horsemanship-distinct-schooling/dp/0668026022/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1389284506&sr=8-3&keywords=Common+Sense+Horsemanship
It includes training for the horse as well as the rider.
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post #24 of 40 Old 01-09-2014, 11:49 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bsms View Post
For hunters and jumpers, I'll recommend:

Common Sense Horsemanship by VS Littauer

http://www.amazon.com/Common-sense-horsemanship-distinct-schooling/dp/0668026022/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1389284506&sr=8-3&keywords=Common+Sense+Horsemanship
It includes training for the horse as well as the rider.
Perfect! Thanks :)
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post #25 of 40 Old 01-09-2014, 11:59 AM
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I think some horses just naturally throw their heads up, whenever something is interesting/annoying/frightening. For example, my filly pickles has a naturally level headset, 24/7. you would have to be very rough on her mouth, have a very poor fitting saddle, or get her extremely excited for her head to go up. On the other hand, this is Nevada, who's head goes up when anything interesting happens. In these pictures there is nothing scary, she just looks like this at liberty(and under saddle), whenever anything interesting happens:





yet naturally, when relaxed, she has a much lower headset. 90% of the time her head is low, but if nervous/annoyed/scared/interested it goes up. I guess what I'm getting to is that its much, MUCH harder to train a horse out of a life long natural reaction, and it will likely take a lot of hard work and time investment to get even reasonably consistent.
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post #26 of 40 Old 01-09-2014, 12:55 PM Thread Starter
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Well that's fine. I'm going to keep him until he dies, so it's worth the hard work and time.
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post #27 of 40 Old 01-09-2014, 03:24 PM
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If you stop concerning yourself with where he carries his head and, instead, focus on getting his body supple and relaxed from poll to dock his head will automatically be where it needs to be.

The whole idea of collection is to get the horse to coil the loins, lift the back (by doing nothing with his back muscles but rather engaging his abdominal muscles), and lifting the base of the neck. It has nothing to do with the head. The head goes up when the back muscles are contracted and tight. Jaw flexions and circles that get the horse to step under himself help to loosen and supple the horse's entire body. Get him relaxed and keep him relaxed and his head will drop on its own accord.
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post #28 of 40 Old 01-09-2014, 03:27 PM Thread Starter
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Okay thanks!
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post #29 of 40 Old 01-09-2014, 03:39 PM
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OP, since this is a former rope horse, it will take quite a bit of time for him to get used to not "bracing" against contact...we ropers like our horses to avoid the contact so that when we do contact them with the bit, they either drop the hind end to "set" the cow for the turn; or they should be stopping and backing up....

One way to get him used to this is to ask him to back while keeping his head low from the start(most will usually pick the head up a bit when they start to back); then, once you get this ask him to keep his head there(low) after you quit queing the back; once he is good at that, then ask for forward movement while in contact with the bit....and keep progressing up with your speed...

alot of ropers never worry about headset, only that the horse moves off the bit, so your horse is just doing what he thought you wanted

and to add, I don't think his headset is that high....
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post #30 of 40 Old 01-09-2014, 04:28 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ropinbiker View Post
OP, since this is a former rope horse, it will take quite a bit of time for him to get used to not "bracing" against contact...we ropers like our horses to avoid the contact so that when we do contact them with the bit, they either drop the hind end to "set" the cow for the turn; or they should be stopping and backing up....

One way to get him used to this is to ask him to back while keeping his head low from the start(most will usually pick the head up a bit when they start to back); then, once you get this ask him to keep his head there(low) after you quit queing the back; once he is good at that, then ask for forward movement while in contact with the bit....and keep progressing up with your speed...

alot of ropers never worry about headset, only that the horse moves off the bit, so your horse is just doing what he thought you wanted

and to add, I don't think his headset is that high....
Thanks for the tips! I'll try that, and I've owned him for 7 months, so it's come down quite a bit. But I need it more long and low, he's coming a long way. So I have no doubt we will get there. We're just not there yet.
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