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High Strung OTTB!!

This is a discussion on High Strung OTTB!! within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Cant ride high strung horse
  • Ottb gets too excited

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    08-18-2012, 02:34 PM
  #21
Weanling
My TB is long off the track, but he still has incredibly hot days, especially in the spring. Try lounging her, every day, before you ride her. It especially helps with OtTBs as they were trained that way. Canter especially. What type of grain are you feeding her? Many grains and alfalfa hays make TBs hot, such as Omelene, sweet feed, and sometimes plain oats. Try feeding her Doybean meal or rice bran. It keeps weight on the hard keepers beautifully without making them hot, except I had one TB who got bad diarrhea from soybean meal. When you ride her, and she feels like bucking, get into two point and just let her canter forward for awhile...this more than anything will calm a TB down, as it allows them to settle into a rhythm. With greenies, though, don't let her go TOO fast or she will likely start running away with you or get too excited. Just do lots of
Canter work and lounging and transitions, and put her out to pasture or at least let her run free in an arena for an
Hour or so every day
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    08-18-2012, 03:05 PM
  #22
Green Broke
10 quarts of grain is A LOT! Unless she is going into some hardcore training program she doesn't need that. Cut back on the grain and free her more hay. Grain doesn't put that much weight on them, hay will. A TWH I was working with was VERY skinny. The moron at the place she was board at bumped her up to 8 quarts of senior grain. Even 200 pounds under weight she was a MONSTER to ride or handle. Your horse does NOT look very skinny, but she could use a few pounds. There is no reason to be feeding her like crazy.

She also needs room to move around, get her out in some kind of paddock/pasture. Tell the BO that's what you want, if not maybe its time to find a new barn. After all you are the customer! I would never except anything less then half day turn out in an area where they can move comfortably, even if its in a 200x200 paddock.
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    08-18-2012, 03:18 PM
  #23
Weanling
She has one of those hay nets because she was spreading her hay around her stall and making a mess. I think some people misunderstood what I meant when I said stall board. She isn't always in a stall, just during the hot hours of the day. I rode her again today and she was much better, but she is in heat. I rode her for an hour and she still had lots of energy afterwards, but she controlled herself :) soon I'm going back to school and I can't ride her everyday. That should be fun...
     
    08-18-2012, 03:25 PM
  #24
Foal
You may benefit from either paying someone to go out and lunge her the days you can't be there or part leasing her to someone who is there more than you.
     
    08-18-2012, 03:40 PM
  #25
Weanling
Problem is that I'm the person who comes out to my barn the most apart from the owner. We would be charged for the owner to lunge her and my dad is done spending money on horses apart from board and farrier etc..
My mom might be able to go out to the barn when I can't and she would just be able to walk her on a lead rope and this probably won't help. As soon as winter is over she will be field boarded, but untill then-- Do you think it would be best to just let her get her energy out by cantering for a while and then get on with the rest of the ride?
     
    08-18-2012, 04:03 PM
  #26
Weanling
I think you may be looking for a magic solution for your problem. By taking on an OTTB there are certain things you need to expect. Like having to lunge or turn her out every day so she doesn't get stir crazy. Also, figuring out what diet works to keep weight on but still keeping high energy foods out. Looks like you should just plan on heading to the barn once or twice a day, every day. Get up early before school and lunge her then ride her when you get home. Or lunge her again if you can't ride. An OTTB is a great horse but right off the track they usually need a little extra attention than if you went out and bought a QH.

I hope this doesn't sound too harsh but the reality is she will only improve with work every day. There is no short cut here.
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    08-18-2012, 06:08 PM
  #27
Teen Forum Moderator
For pasture board, do you get to supply your own feed for her? Is it a dry lot or is there actual grazing for her? If so, I'd say just pasture board her for a few months and see how she does. You might even find that she'll gain weight even when getting less food because her metabolism will regulate itself better with constant access to exercise AND food. I know that our TBs do tremendousely better when they can move around whever they want to. They also keep their condition better and are much easier to handle.

You might also look at trying to find another boarding stable that can accomodate her better. One with pasture board that has maybe 2 or three other pasture mates and you can bring your own feed/she gets fed seperately. There really is no quick fix for this and letting her canter from the start when you ride her is a very bad idea because you won't get anywhere with your training. Actually, IMO, you shouldnt eve be letting her canter AT ALL yet if you've only had her for a month. We gave our OTTBs ATLEAST a 3 month let down from the track where we did only ground work and let them be horses in the pasture, and I didnt start cantering them until the 5th or 6th month of owning them...and only if they walked and trotted quietly first. Besides that you wil be teaching her that running when she wants to is ok and that she can get away with crazy behavior. That's the last thing that you need to have in her head.

Whether it be finding someone to lunge her or let her play in the arena every day, finding a place where she can be turned out at least half of the day, or better yet- 24/7 pasture boarded- you do need to deal with the situation, not just her behavior under saddle. ANY horse will go stir crazy when living in a stall and only coming out to be ridden because it just isnt natural for them, but a young race-fit, race-fed OTTB will be even worse. You need to think about her mental wellbeing, not just how to get her to behave.

Our 'Crazy' OTTB gelding, two and a half years off of the track. 24/7 pasture with 8 other horses, only getting rice bran, free choice hay, and corn oil, low man on the totem pole (dispite being 17.3hh) and as you can see- happy, healthy, and absolutely too high energy for us to deal with ;) in fact I think he's about to eat that little mini and bolt on that little girl!



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    08-18-2012, 07:00 PM
  #28
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ashsunnyeventer    
The vet thought maybe she was coming into heat??
This is the first mare I've owned and I haven't even had her for a month so this could possibly be the issue
That certainly could be it! A 4 year-old OTTB in heat sounds like hell on four legs!
Gosh, I remember when I owned a half-arab filly who I NEVER wanted to be around when she was in heat. Also, they cramp up like human women do so I wouldn't doubt that she is in pain a little
:)
     
    08-18-2012, 07:53 PM
  #29
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by BoldComic    
I think you may be looking for a magic solution for your problem. By taking on an OTTB there are certain things you need to expect. Like having to lunge or turn her out every day so she doesn't get stir crazy. Also, figuring out what diet works to keep weight on but still keeping high energy foods out. Looks like you should just plan on heading to the barn once or twice a day, every day. Get up early before school and lunge her then ride her when you get home. Or lunge her again if you can't ride. An OTTB is a great horse but right off the track they usually need a little extra attention than if you went out and bought a QH.

I hope this doesn't sound too harsh but the reality is she will only improve with work every day. There is no short cut here.
I very strongly agree. If you don't have time to give her exercise during the school year, seriously the best option for her safety and health might be to sell her to someone who can. You really need to be at least lounging her at least 3-4 times a week if you expect her to be manageable. And yes, after a 5-10 minute walk warmup, if you haven't lounged, the best thing might be to canter for awhile. :)
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    08-19-2012, 05:49 PM
  #30
Weanling
I didn't get her right off the track. She had about 4 months of let down just being a horse in a field before they started her again. She has been off the track for about 10 months now. Today I lunged her because I didn't have time to ride and found out she doesn't lunge to the right. Just something else to work on I guess...
     

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bucking, hot horse, thouroughbred

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